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MJ Semon





Joined: 18 Jul 2015

Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat 18 Jul, 2015 7:32 pm    Post subject: Sword restoration         Reply with quote

Hello folks, first time post here, and for those on here that have served, thank you....

My father attended and graduated Admiral Farragut back in the 50's and I have his sword from that time. It is obviously missing it's strap and tassels, but is otherwise intact, and in need of restoration.

I searched some earlier threads and didn't really come up with anything current. What is the collective consensus on the best place to send a sword for restoration. I can also post some pictures if needed....

Thanks,

MJS....
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
Likes: 30 pages

Posts: 641

PostPosted: Sun 19 Jul, 2015 6:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'll just throw this out there, it's certainly just an idea and not likely a consensus view.

Your sword is not a real antique to justify a museum looking at it and doing conservation work, but it's old enough and an heirloom of sorts, you may not want to do any restoration yourself.

If it were mine, I'd actually contact a few American nihonto (Japanese sword) polishers who do restoration work and see if they'd be interested. The steel would be easier for them to clean and polish, and so not as expensive, and they would have experience with other swords from that time.

Might be a nice quick job for a guy looking for an out of the ordinary project. I can give you some people's emails if you think this is a way to go. One thing, there's a small group of them, so they are all usually busy and have backlogged work.
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MJ Semon





Joined: 18 Jul 2015

Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sun 19 Jul, 2015 7:01 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

J. Nicolaysen wrote:
I'll just throw this out there, it's certainly just an idea and not likely a consensus view.

Your sword is not a real antique to justify a museum looking at it and doing conservation work, but it's old enough and an heirloom of sorts, you may not want to do any restoration yourself.

If it were mine, I'd actually contact a few American nihonto (Japanese sword) polishers who do restoration work and see if they'd be interested. The steel would be easier for them to clean and polish, and so not as expensive, and they would have experience with other swords from that time.

Might be a nice quick job for a guy looking for an out of the ordinary project. I can give you some people's emails if you think this is a way to go. One thing, there's a small group of them, so they are all usually busy and have backlogged work.


Hi J, I think that's exactly what I am looking for. A light restoration and maybe replating the sheath. Something to make it look nice in a display box that I'll fabricate.

Feel free to PM me the contacts.

Thanks,

MJS
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Glen A Cleeton




Location: Nipmuc USA
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 1,793

PostPosted: Sun 19 Jul, 2015 3:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

We;come aboard.

Please share some pictures of the item and show the current condition.

I would assume it is a standard modern US 1852 naval sword.

Marlow White is a current distributor for swords and accessories. They may sell a scabbard and certainly other things you are looking for.
http://www.marlowwhite.com/

If the sword itself is intact, a gentle cleaning is all you need to do. Cleaning and conservation vs restoration. If it was a cruciform hilt cadet sword, even less will need to be addressed. Again, pictures ad better information can help others help you. The standard naval sword will have a plastic grip, so you are not going to be dealing with an organic. Cleaning and polishing the hilt no more of a chore than doing kitchen work.

Aside from an article found on the main page of this site, there are many more thoughts. Here is another with discussion.
http://www.swordforum.com/forums/showthread.p...nservation

Good luck with the project, I almost went to Farragut but ended to another less structured naval influenced school.

Cheers

GC


Last edited by Glen A Cleeton on Mon 20 Jul, 2015 8:00 am; edited 1 time in total
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
Likes: 30 pages

Posts: 641

PostPosted: Mon 20 Jul, 2015 5:43 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Glen, I'm glad you posted since I consider you and a few other gentlemen here excellent resources for these later types of swords.

I agree that posting pictures would be a very good way for this forum to make a better recommendation whether professional help is even needed.
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