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Gerald Fa.





Joined: 29 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Tue 05 May, 2015 12:20 am    Post subject: flexibility of front and back plate armor?         Reply with quote

I have just got a new front German Gothic plate armor, and I am very surprised of how flexible the front plate is! Each plate from the Gothic armor can move a bit due to the rivets and the oval shaped holes that are in the bottom plate that is over lapped. Is it historically accurate? Either way I love this armor! It is the best one I have!

Thanks!

I can see how a man in plate armor can still shoot a bow on a horse while moving.



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My new new front German Gothic plate armor. 1.2 mm of high carbon harden Steel
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Craig Peters




PostPosted: Tue 05 May, 2015 4:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Do you mean the faulds? http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faulds_%28armour%29

Yes, it's historically accurate. See here for examples: http://myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=214...ght=extant
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Pieter B.





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PostPosted: Tue 05 May, 2015 5:08 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I believe so.

The faulds tend to start quite near to the navel which means only your upper chest can't move. However since that space is filled with a rib cage you won't do much flexing there anyway.
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Gerald Fa.





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PostPosted: Tue 05 May, 2015 9:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Craig Peters wrote:
Do you mean the faulds? http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faulds_%28armour%29

Yes, it's historically accurate. See here for examples: http://myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=214...ght=extant


Well not just the faulds, almost each plate that you see in that armor that is connected can move a bit. Yes and the faulds are very flexible! I think the most flexible parts of the armor.

Pieter B. wrote:
I believe so.

The faulds tend to start quite near to the navel which means only your upper chest can't move. However since that space is filled with a rib cage you won't do much flexing there anyway.


Yea that is what I mean everything moves on the armor, I think even the upper chest can move a little. Each plate in it can move around but just a little a bit, the faulds moves the most. The way it can move "around" is placing the slight skinny oval shaped holes of the rivet a bit sideways or in a slight angle. This armor is amazing!






I will have a real pitcher of the inside of my plate soon so I can show you what I am talking about.


Let me show a crappy picture I made for everyone to get a better idea what I am trying to say.


This is the in side look at the upper part of the German Gothic plate armor of what I have. (the link below) Is it historically accurate?



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Lafayette C Curtis




Location: Indonesia
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PostPosted: Wed 06 May, 2015 5:52 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Google up "sliding rivets." It's a perfectly normal feature in 15th-century armour. Your breastplate might have more of them than what would have been typical for its time, but not to the extent of being unrealistic or ahistorical.
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Gerald Fa.





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PostPosted: Wed 06 May, 2015 6:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lafayette C Curtis wrote:
Google up "sliding rivets." It's a perfectly normal feature in 15th-century armour. Your breastplate might have more of them than what would have been typical for its time, but not to the extent of being unrealistic or ahistorical.


Thanks! That is what I was looking for, if it is a fact and as well as the name or term of it. I will start to look it up..
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Gerald Fa.





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PostPosted: Thu 07 May, 2015 10:27 am    Post subject: In insde         Reply with quote

Here is what I been talking about.


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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
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PostPosted: Thu 07 May, 2015 11:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Interesting, who made it?
Currently working on projects ranging from Elizabethan pageants to a WW1 Tank, Victorian fairgrounds 1066 events and more. Oh and we joust loads!.. We run over 250 events for English Heritage each year plus many others for Historic Royal Palaces, Historic Scotland, the National Trust and more. If you live in the UK and are interested in working for us just drop us a line with a cv.
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James Arlen Gillaspie
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Location: upstate NY
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PostPosted: Fri 08 May, 2015 5:09 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sorry, Gerald, I have never seen a real 'gothic' breasplate, even Italian export piecs, that had such a sliding rivet arrangement. Check Goll's thesis and you will see a lot of insides of 'gothic' breastplates.
https://plus.google.com/photos/100096262631351613656/albums/6078287958238859953?banner=pwa&authkey=CIrSnIWB4aLl0AE

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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
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PostPosted: Mon 11 May, 2015 6:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

or painted with red oxide inside for that matter. Bit of a modern armorers quirk.
Currently working on projects ranging from Elizabethan pageants to a WW1 Tank, Victorian fairgrounds 1066 events and more. Oh and we joust loads!.. We run over 250 events for English Heritage each year plus many others for Historic Royal Palaces, Historic Scotland, the National Trust and more. If you live in the UK and are interested in working for us just drop us a line with a cv.
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Pieter B.





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PostPosted: Tue 12 May, 2015 3:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The famed sigismund of tyrol armor does show rivets on the outside (like this reproduction). Can anyone confirm they are stationary non-sliding rivets?



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Bob Haynes




Location: Mount Perry, Ohio
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PostPosted: Tue 12 May, 2015 6:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I just wanted to relate that I think this topic is stellar, gentlemen. I feel I'm learning much about armor and articulation.
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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Wed 13 May, 2015 12:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quote:
I can see how a man in plate armor can still shoot a bow on a horse while moving.


Its kind of doable, but in pretty unique circumstances. Its not something that's considered normal practice outside manuscripts and you'd be delivering a small % of what the bows power was due to your stance on the horse.

Currently working on projects ranging from Elizabethan pageants to a WW1 Tank, Victorian fairgrounds 1066 events and more. Oh and we joust loads!.. We run over 250 events for English Heritage each year plus many others for Historic Royal Palaces, Historic Scotland, the National Trust and more. If you live in the UK and are interested in working for us just drop us a line with a cv.
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Gerald Fa.





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PostPosted: Tue 26 May, 2015 3:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Pieter B. wrote:
The famed sigismund of tyrol armor does show rivets on the outside (like this reproduction). Can anyone confirm they are stationary non-sliding rivets?





It is hard to know unless
A. some one moves around in it.
B. If you look in the inside of the armor as the overlapping plates can cover anything.

I love the Gothic look. But now I been looking at some of the Greenwich stuff.
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Edward Lee




Location: New York
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PostPosted: Tue 26 May, 2015 4:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Gerald

That's a really nice breastplate, who made it though?

Thanks
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James Arlen Gillaspie
Industry Professional



Location: upstate NY
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PostPosted: Thu 28 May, 2015 8:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I can confirm that there are no sliders in the breastplate proper, only in the fauld. Cool
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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
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PostPosted: Thu 28 May, 2015 9:25 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'll assume by breastplate proper you are excluding the underarm gussets James. Do you know if they slide? I presume so, but not wishing to trawl through Goll....
Currently working on projects ranging from Elizabethan pageants to a WW1 Tank, Victorian fairgrounds 1066 events and more. Oh and we joust loads!.. We run over 250 events for English Heritage each year plus many others for Historic Royal Palaces, Historic Scotland, the National Trust and more. If you live in the UK and are interested in working for us just drop us a line with a cv.
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James Arlen Gillaspie
Industry Professional



Location: upstate NY
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PostPosted: Fri 29 May, 2015 7:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The gussets do not slide, either. There are gussets that simply pivot on the end rivets, and the springyness of the steel is what makes them resume their place.
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Gerald Fa.





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PostPosted: Sun 31 May, 2015 10:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Edward Lee wrote:
Gerald

That's a really nice breastplate, who made it though?

Thanks


Oh no, My armor is the one from the very top, it is heavily based on this one, in fact it is the same but with out the bras and not very polished.
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Edward Lee




Location: New York
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PostPosted: Mon 01 Jun, 2015 12:01 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Gerald Fa. wrote:
Edward Lee wrote:
Gerald

That's a really nice breastplate, who made it though?

Thanks


Oh no, My armor is the one from the very top, it is heavily based on this one, in fact it is the same but with out the bras and not very polished.


That is the one I meant. It looks really nice, would like to know who made it though, thanks.
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