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Susan Carter




Location: AUSTRALIA
Joined: 29 Apr 2015

Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed 29 Apr, 2015 7:36 pm    Post subject: unknown european warsword         Reply with quote

I am looking for information on this warsword. This sword was described as a berlin templar sword. It is extremely heavy requiring 2 hands, and looks hand forged. It has four pointed stars in scrolled down quillons, and came from Europe. I had issues adding any attachment and added as filename.


 Attachment: 350.37 KB
sword [ Download ]

sc
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Jean Henri Chandler




Location: New Orleans
Joined: 20 Nov 2006

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Posts: 1,078

PostPosted: Wed 29 Apr, 2015 7:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm sorry but it looks fake to me. Maybe 19th Century? Probably 20th.

J

System D'Armes Historical European fencing in New Orleans

Essays on Hroarr

Introducing the Codex Guide to the Medieval Baltic
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Mark Lewis





Joined: 19 Apr 2014

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Posts: 359

PostPosted: Wed 29 Apr, 2015 8:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Appears to be based on this sword in Madrid:


Sorry ,can't find a clearer photo...
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David Cooper




Location: UK
Joined: 27 Apr 2008
Likes: 2 pages

Posts: 110

PostPosted: Thu 30 Apr, 2015 5:25 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Susan
Do you have any pictures of the whole sword?, because at the moment I agree with Mark. I suspect this to be a Victorian, blacksmith made, wall hanger.

The journey not the destination
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Neil Melville




Location: Scotland
Joined: 27 Oct 2009

Posts: 183

PostPosted: Thu 30 Apr, 2015 5:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Susan,
I'm afraid I have to agree with all the above replies. From your photo the sword looks too heavy and crude to be genuine.
But photos of the whole blade and whole hilt would help resolve the matter.
Neil

N Melville
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Peter Johnsson
Industry Professional



Location: Storvreta, Sweden
Joined: 27 Aug 2003
Reading list: 1 book

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Posts: 1,757

PostPosted: Thu 30 Apr, 2015 6:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This is a modern sword made to correspond to romantic notions of the medieval period.
It may work as an object of decoration in a dimly lit room, when seen from afar.
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Jean Henri Chandler




Location: New Orleans
Joined: 20 Nov 2006

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Posts: 1,078

PostPosted: Thu 30 Apr, 2015 12:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wonderful to see you chiming in here Peter!

How far back do those kind of hilts go in Spain by the way?

I remember someone showed me a photo of what he said was "the" El Cid sword and I commented that the hilt looked like it was from a later period (thereby offended the poor guy) but afterword it occurred to me I didn't know much about sword hilt typology (or sword typology in general) in Spain. These swords are Arab influenced I assume, how different were Spanish swords in the early to high medieval period?

J

System D'Armes Historical European fencing in New Orleans

Essays on Hroarr

Introducing the Codex Guide to the Medieval Baltic
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Mark Lewis





Joined: 19 Apr 2014

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Posts: 359

PostPosted: Thu 30 Apr, 2015 1:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The sword I posted supposedly belonged to Ferdinand III, d. 1252. I'd guess the hilt is Andalusian work, and can't find any reference to it being of later manufacture...

El Cid's legendary swords Tizona and Colada are on Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tizona
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colada

At least the hilt of Tizona is a Spanish style from around 1500, and Colada is even later.

There is another "Tizona" held in Madrid... the hilt is entirely lost, but the blade carries an inscription of letters and birds similar to those appearing on Oakeshott's Xa.14-16, which could date it to the 11th century(?).
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