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Lancelot Chan
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Location: Hong Kong
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PostPosted: Thu 23 Apr, 2015 3:02 am    Post subject: Single handed drill with a heavy sword         Reply with quote

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpkCLvZzvng

Single handed drills with the heaviest DS (tinker made, 4.75 lbs, 7.5" POB). Random strikes with random footwork, no usage on waist and leg power. The first part of the video shows a series of "Parry and counter attack" with single hand only.

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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Thu 23 Apr, 2015 8:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm guessing you are practicing control and not going for full possible speed on any of the strokes to avoid over committing, the point of the exercise is to practice the various angles of attacks/parries and at the same time strengthen the forearm and wrist.

With the random walking it might be to be able to chose a striking angle independent of using the optimum footwork as one may have to attack at an angle where the foot position isn't perfect.

The large gloves probably make holding the sword a bit more challenging I think.

Now, I think it would be more efficient using waist rotation and footwork to drive the sword forward and not depend on only arm movement, so there must be a special point in doing the drill in this way ?

Waist rotation and using leg power can be barely visible but one feels like even one's toes are contributing to the power of a sword stroke, or a punch: In other words the actual movement of hips and legs can be very small in amplitude and be very subtle while still contribution a large majority of the power in attack and in recovery.

So my post is mostly speculation and questions rather than affirmative statements, but I'm curious about your possible reply.

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Lancelot Chan
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Location: Hong Kong
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PostPosted: Thu 23 Apr, 2015 11:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This is mainly for strength training. hahhaha. And to isolate the activation of a strike from the rest of the body, would make opponent unable to read from the "slight coordination" before the strike actually happens. Of course, as you said, if you launch the strike with parts barely noticeable, it would be equally well hidden. However, I did this the most challenging way because 1. as training, 2. using the smallest part available to do it for the smallest part is the quickest reflection part. The second point benefits a lot in combat. For example, if I command my leg or my wrist to react, it's slower than to command my fingers to react. Wink

You know us, the modern generation, are computer-games trained. Our fingers are REAL fast. Big Grin LOL! It's just not strong enough. So Hell yeah here's the training. LOL

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
I'm guessing you are practicing control and not going for full possible speed on any of the strokes to avoid over committing, the point of the exercise is to practice the various angles of attacks/parries and at the same time strengthen the forearm and wrist.

With the random walking it might be to be able to chose a striking angle independent of using the optimum footwork as one may have to attack at an angle where the foot position isn't perfect.

The large gloves probably make holding the sword a bit more challenging I think.

Now, I think it would be more efficient using waist rotation and footwork to drive the sword forward and not depend on only arm movement, so there must be a special point in doing the drill in this way ?

Waist rotation and using leg power can be barely visible but one feels like even one's toes are contributing to the power of a sword stroke, or a punch: In other words the actual movement of hips and legs can be very small in amplitude and be very subtle while still contribution a large majority of the power in attack and in recovery.

So my post is mostly speculation and questions rather than affirmative statements, but I'm curious about your possible reply.

Ancient Combat Association http://www.acahk.org
Realistic Sparring Weapons http://www.rsw.com.hk
Nightstalkers http://www.nightstalkers.com.hk
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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
Joined: 15 Mar 2004
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Spotlight topics: 5
Posts: 8,148

PostPosted: Fri 24 Apr, 2015 10:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lancelot Chan wrote:
This is mainly for strength training. hahhaha. And to isolate the activation of a strike from the rest of the body, would make opponent unable to read from the "slight coordination" before the strike actually happens. Of course, as you said, if you launch the strike with parts barely noticeable, it would be equally well hidden. However, I did this the most challenging way because 1. as training, 2. using the smallest part available to do it for the smallest part is the quickest reflection part. The second point benefits a lot in combat. For example, if I command my leg or my wrist to react, it's slower than to command my fingers to react. Wink



Ah, yes the strength training in being able to move the sword by arm and wrist alone makes a lot of sense. ( or just fingers ).

The smallest part idea seems to me to be the same principle as Sliver's time of the hand and even when the whole body ends up powering a cut the hands should start the motion first, even if it looks to an outside observer as almost simultaneous: Training in using the arm and hand plus, a bit of shoulder in isolation, trains the mind into first moving the hand before anything else when one is in measure or one half step from measure.

When one is way out of measure one may have to move the body and legs first to get into measure.

The whole thing about using the hand first and " The Smallest Part " is that it minimizes any telegraphing and one gains an advantage in reaction time because the opponent has no clue about your intent before the hand starts to move.

I'm basically saying the same thing you are and just giving you more feedback here. Wink Big Grin

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Lancelot Chan
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Location: Hong Kong
Joined: 24 Oct 2003
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PostPosted: Fri 24 Apr, 2015 11:02 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yup, the same idea. And to make random strikes with random footwork, uncoordinated, was to make myself less predictable so the opponent couldn't guess out when, where and how I would strike, from how I coordinate the leg and waist according to the striking angle.

Jean Thibodeau wrote:

Ah, yes the strength training in being able to move the sword by arm and wrist alone makes a lot of sense. ( or just fingers ).

The smallest part idea seems to me to be the same principle as Sliver's time of the hand and even when the whole body ends up powering a cut the hands should start the motion first, even if it looks to an outside observer as almost simultaneous: Training in using the arm and hand plus, a bit of shoulder in isolation, trains the mind into first moving the hand before anything else when one is in measure or one half step from measure.

When one is way out of measure one may have to move the body and legs first to get into measure.

The whole thing about using the hand first and " The Smallest Part " is that it minimizes any telegraphing and one gains an advantage in reaction time because the opponent has no clue about your intent before the hand starts to move.

I'm basically saying the same thing you are and just giving you more feedback here. Wink Big Grin

Ancient Combat Association http://www.acahk.org
Realistic Sparring Weapons http://www.rsw.com.hk
Nightstalkers http://www.nightstalkers.com.hk
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website


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