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Henrik Granlid




Location: Sweden
Joined: 17 Apr 2012

Posts: 103

PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2015 10:54 am    Post subject: swords and thunderstorms?         Reply with quote

So, Google has failed me and I turn to you.

Were there any common practices during thunderstorms to put away/lay down sheathed swords? I'm looking particularly at the 14th century, although sources on carrying swords from any period would help.

looking forward to answers.
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Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Reading list: 13 books

Posts: 960

PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2015 3:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've never heard of such. Why would there be?
The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
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Theo Squires





Joined: 23 Jul 2012

Posts: 64

PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2015 4:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If the concern is being zapped by lightning, I suspect a pointy helmet (or spear, pike, halberd, poll-axe etc) would pose a similar risk as a sword. My guess is that people avoided fighting in thunderstorms because of the rain more than any risk from lightning. Aside from it being miserable, the mud would make it risky for cavalry and dismounted knights and make troop coordination difficult due to poor visibility.

Although I could be missing the point of your question.
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Gregg Sobocinski




Location: Michigan
Joined: 21 Sep 2007
Likes: 4 pages
Reading list: 12 books

Posts: 128

PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2015 7:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Did people of that era even know that lightning is attracted to tall, conductive objects? I suspect not, since people were only just getting the idea in the eighteenth century. Ben Franklin is credited with the first lightning rod in 1749.

Then again, there may have been a common knowledge, but not a scientific one.
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Raman A




Location: United States
Joined: 25 Aug 2011

Posts: 143

PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2015 10:04 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sorry, I don't know the answer to your question but this thread might interest you:

http://myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=30411
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