Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > What do you folks think? Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Eric McHugh
Industry Professional



Location: Crown Point, IN
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 401

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2015 3:23 pm    Post subject: What do you folks think?         Reply with quote

Well, I'm ready to start crafting things again. Forge is blazing. Got my anvil. I've been making tongs. Basically I've been driving my wife nuts bringing dirt into the house.

I was thinking of starting with axes again. I was making two part axes when I lived in Wisconsin, but now I'm thinking of crafting three part Danish and two part bearded axes, but I wanted to start a conversation about what you folks are interested in collecting. Here a three photos I've been using to make my sketches for the smithy.


This is a small Danish style axe (Peterson Type L? Does that sound correct?). I documented this axe with Peter Johnsson in Sweden. It is a nice little axe with a 5" blade (12.7 cm) and weighs about .84 pounds or 384 grams. I love this little axe.

The thing I've noticed on a lot of reproductions is the lack of thickness towards the cutting edge. Most smiths make a straight taper, but the originals I've documents all had a noticeable thickness behind the cutting edge. I believe this is because the cutting steel was forge welded onto the low carbon body steel and then forged to an edge. I've done some experiments, and the results would verify this idea. In fact, on one of the large examples in the British Museum you see a hard line where the cutting steel was sandwiched on top of the body steel. On some examples, the center is 3-4 mm thick then it swells to 7-8 before it tapers to a sharp edge. I'm going to do these in three parts: a low carbon eye socket section forged and welded to a low carbon body section, then two high carbon strips forged and welded to that to make the cutting edge.



Bigger Danish from the same trip. This blade is about 8.5" (21.5 cm) and weighs 1.14 pounds (520 grams). This is one example where the center body section is quite thin (about 3 mm). Some of this was due to corrosion but it is clearly a design feature. It then swells to about 7 mm, 20 mm behind the cutting edge.



Bearded axe from the Copenhagen. Don't really have the stats on this but from memory and notes the blade is about 6 inches (15.2 cm). These are more wedge shaped. The bigger ones often have some taper to them probably to keep the weight down. Definitely an axe that was meant for business.

So, what do you think? Is there interest in these sort of ax types? I do have plans to do some other types, but that is for another day.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Glen A Cleeton




Location: Nipmuc USA
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 1,808

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2015 5:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I had seen an axe or few from you in the past and they were beautiful as well as well received. I can't say sign me up for a commission but I like the smaller axes. I don't know if you ever saw the very small axe Chris Makin did in more of a miniature bearded form but it had my knees quaking. A short hafted Danish would likely have a similar effect on me Happy

I say go for it!

Cheers

GC
View user's profile Send private message
Tyler Jordan





Joined: 15 Mar 2004

Posts: 93

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2015 5:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The second one looks really interesting. So does it taper to a thinner point behind the body of the head before thickening again for the haft?
View user's profile Send private message
J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
Likes: 31 pages

Posts: 656

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2015 5:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I love axes and wish to express this love through collecting more of them. I have four so far, of very different styles and time periods. Was planning to get a francisca this year, but I had someone in mind for that already.

There are many other types of franciscas and viking axes that I would love to have. I really liked the Danish axe you made that Patrick Kelly had.

A nice type L axe would probably derail my careful plans for this year...in a good way no doubt. Would your Type L be a single-handed or two-handed version?

Someday I hope to be able to commission a Mammen style axe, complete with the fine silver inlay. That's a bit down the road for me, budget wise however. I don't know who can do that style of engraving. Perhaps that would be a joint project.

Anyhow, there are plenty of people excited about your work in particular, and axes in general, I am sure you will find some interested parties


Last edited by J. Nicolaysen on Thu 08 Jan, 2015 7:36 pm; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message
Joe Fults




Location: Midwest
Joined: 02 Sep 2003

Posts: 3,427

Feedback score: 100%
(3 total ▮ 100% positive)
PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2015 5:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think I'd just recommend that if you're not doing this to pay bills, rather you're doing it as a hobby, just make what you want to make and then find homes for the stuff. Seems like almost every artist who ends up trying to make what other people want as a hobby ends up a victim of good intentions and bad expectations.
"Our life is what our thoughts make it"
-Marcus Aurelius

"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."
-John F. Kennedy
View user's profile Send private message
Eric McHugh
Industry Professional



Location: Crown Point, IN
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 401

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2015 6:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Joe Fults wrote:
I think I'd just recommend that if you're not doing this to pay bills, rather you're doing it as a hobby, just make what you want to make and then find homes for the stuff. Seems like almost every artist who ends up trying to make what other people want as a hobby ends up a victim of good intentions and bad expectations.


Oh I agree. I'm just trying to get a feel for things. Mostly, I'm just trying to start a discussion about these types.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Eric McHugh
Industry Professional



Location: Crown Point, IN
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 401

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2015 6:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tyler Jordan wrote:
The second one looks really interesting. So does it taper to a thinner point behind the body of the head before thickening again for the haft?


Picture is worth a thousand words...right!



On this ax, it is probably 30-32 mm wide at that socket, 3-5 mm in the middle and then 9-10 right behind the edge.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Joe Maccarrone




Location: Seattle, WA USA
Joined: 19 Sep 2003

Posts: 161

Feedback score: 100%
(1 total ▮ 100% positive)
PostPosted: Thu 08 Jan, 2015 9:13 pm    Post subject: Re: What do you folks think?         Reply with quote

Eric McHugh wrote:

So, what do you think? Is there interest in these sort of ax types?


Ohh, yes there is. Especially a thin-bodied, fast Danish. That one on about a 40" haft would be awesome. Big Grin
View user's profile Send private message
Carl W.




Location: usa
Joined: 07 Aug 2008

Posts: 157

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Fri 09 Jan, 2015 5:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

An axe or maybe 2 is on my list, likely both medium size erring smaller rather than towards much larger. You picked nice ones to start with.

I don't know practical aspects of the following (including care/rust pain which could change my mind) but might consider if "final finish" can be left for buyer preference? Fwiw 1 data point but for axes I have always been far more attracted to rough black finish than highly polished. Also like non-pristine or even blackened hafts.

Minor considerations above. I agree with Joe - make what you feel like making. Glad you're back.
View user's profile Send private message
Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 5,678

Feedback score: 100%
(5 total ▮ 100% positive)
PostPosted: Mon 12 Jan, 2015 11:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quote:
So, what do you think? Is there interest in these sort of ax types?


Absolutely. The Dane Axe you made me is still one of my favorite pieces. One of these days it needs a younger brother.

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
View user's profile Send private message
Aaron Hoard




Location: Seattle, WA
Joined: 01 Sep 2009
Likes: 4 pages

Posts: 151

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Tue 13 Jan, 2015 6:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like that one at the top.
View user's profile Send private message
Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
Joined: 07 Aug 2011

Posts: 580

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Wed 14 Jan, 2015 2:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

i personally like the 3rd axe head shown in your post. a Patterson E design??? I think, i'm not too up on typologies. I attempted to make something similar this year, but I had trouble with drawing the beard out. what I've come up with is something totally different and since then as evolved into some kind of 'thing.'
View user's profile Send private message
Mike Ruhala




Location: Stuart, Florida
Joined: 24 Jul 2011

Posts: 328

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Wed 14 Jan, 2015 8:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The third axe down is so much like the Arms and Armor Nordland Axe I think you'd have a hard time selling many of them even if yours are forged.

I do think there's a market for a forged type L or M Dane axe with a 7 or 8 inch cutting edge as long as it's pretty close to the originals in that it's got the thickened section at the edge and is relatively light weight overall. There just isn't anything like that readily available on the market right now and it would appeal to enthusiasts of several different centuries and cultures.
View user's profile Send private message
Scott Roush
Industry Professional



Location: Washburn, WI
Joined: 27 Jan 2011

Posts: 452

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Thu 15 Jan, 2015 3:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'd be surprised if you had a hard time selling any forged axe Eric. Especially if you market outside the strict historical area. I get requests for 'Viking bearded axes' more than anything else I do. Having said that .. I agree that the larger Dane axes with the thickened cutting edge would be appealing as there are not as many smiths who can handle those sizes in their gas forges. I'm personally setting up a charcoal forge so that I can make these bigger axes and not have to contend with the small openings in a gas forge.
http://www.bigrockforge.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > What do you folks think?
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum