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Devin A




Location: Alabama
Joined: 09 May 2014

Posts: 5

PostPosted: Wed 02 Jul, 2014 12:34 pm    Post subject: Ancient Turkish Armor         Reply with quote

Hey, was think on making up some Turkic armor from around the 12th century and I am not in the know of the turks saddly. What sort of things would I be working with? Lamellar, chain and what syles of helms did they use? I know little and the internet has revealed little so anybody know anything?
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Timo Nieminen




Location: Brisbane, Australia
Joined: 08 May 2009
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Posts: 1,494

PostPosted: Wed 02 Jul, 2014 6:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Depending on where, helmets could be hemispherical or conical, often spangenhelms. Masked helmets like http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=21615 were used. Lamellar or mail neck protectors, sometimes covering the face or lower face. If you google for "Kipchak helmet", "Tibetan helmet", "Mongolian helmet", you'll see some plausible Turkic helmets.

Some examples:
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/2005.270
http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-colle...arch/26608
http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-colle...arch/26606
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/36.25.53a,b
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:0925_K...13th_c.JPG

The Osprey Men-at-Arms 171, Saladin and the Saracens, has some drawings of relevant helmets (pg 9, basically like the masked helmets above), and some relevant swords.

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Devin A




Location: Alabama
Joined: 09 May 2014

Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu 03 Jul, 2014 3:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks, these should get me a better idea of what Im working with, I know that the turks were a colorful people, was thier armor colorful? I mean the guy Im making these for once told me that a husband usually wore more flower designs on his clothes than his wife XD
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Timo Nieminen




Location: Brisbane, Australia
Joined: 08 May 2009
Likes: 1 page
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 1,494

PostPosted: Thu 03 Jul, 2014 2:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Descriptions of metal lamellar armour I can recall don't say anything about colourful. If they say anything about aesthetics, they say that it's polished. Rawhide lamellar might be (should be?) lacquered, but what colours you'll see, I don't know. Black and red, for sure. Lacing on lamellar might be colourful. All the surviving ones I've seen are natural hide, uncoloured (more recent Tibetan armours).

Don't expect colourful mail.

Helmets are often decorated. Gold, silver, brass inlays and ornaments, sometimes turquoise ornaments. The helmet could be painted, which will add contrast to ornaments.

Expect textiles - both armour and clothing - to be colourful. From Persian miniatures, colourful and/or patterned jackets/robes are normal. Not that different to current Central Asian colourful clothes (but I see fewer stripes in the miniatures). Bright reds, greens, blues, floral patterns, etc. Textile horse armours could be really bright and colourful. Sogdian Central Asia was a major silk producer and exporter, and silk production and the traditional of colourful textiles continued after Turkic groups took over.

Shields were (at least sometimes) brightly painted, and could have gold/silver/brass/iron ornaments. Bright red flaming sun or star on a black field would be a classic motif.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamzanama#mediav...ndaran.jpg
http://www.pinterest.com/francescalevey/arms-and-armour-in-art/

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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