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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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Posts: 677

PostPosted: Fri 13 Jun, 2014 4:47 pm    Post subject: Wyoming Viking         Reply with quote

It's unclear whether the vikings roamed up the Platte River to central Wyoming, but if they had, I think they would have been proud to carry these.

Axe by Peter Szabo.
Danelaw Seax by Petr Florianek.
Small Viking Knife by Jeff Helmes.



Sorry for the dog hairs on the woolen jacket. I need to get a better background.



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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Fri 13 Jun, 2014 5:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The smiths take much better photos than I do!


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Photo and Axe by Peter Szabo

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Photo and Sax by Gullinbursti

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Photo and Knife by Jeff Helmes
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Shahril Dzulkifli




Location: Malaysia
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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jun, 2014 5:13 am    Post subject: Wyoming Viking         Reply with quote


As far as most historians know Vikings did not venture into what is now Wyoming. There is no evidence of any Viking settlement in that state. Got to love the engravings on the hilt of the knife in the middle.

“You have power over your mind - not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength”

- Marcus Aurelius
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Mark Moore




Location: East backwoods-assed Texas
Joined: 01 Oct 2003
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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jun, 2014 9:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some sweeeet stuff there........I can see the little one carving my venison steak. Big Grin .........McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jun, 2014 5:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quote:
As far as most historians know Vikings did not venture into what is now Wyoming. There is no evidence of any Viking settlement in that state. Got to love the engravings on the hilt of the knife in the middle.


Perhaps another discovery might sway the skeptics Wink Stay tuned in a few months...

Quote:
Some sweeeet stuff there........I can see the little one carving my venison steak.


You sir obviously have very good taste and hobbies!
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David Hohl




Location: Oregon
Joined: 07 Feb 2011

Posts: 57

PostPosted: Wed 18 Jun, 2014 5:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Unfortunately since you can't grow grapes in Wyoming it's out of the running for the elusive Vinland colony.
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Mark Moore




Location: East backwoods-assed Texas
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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jun, 2014 6:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you, J. I should like my steak medium-rare with a wine sauce of mushrooms and onions. Other than that.................Beautiful stuff.....................McM
''Life is like a box of chocolates...'' --- F. Gump
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
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PostPosted: Sun 12 Oct, 2014 2:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Further discoveries seem to confirm a small but passionate Viking settlement in a sparsely populated and remote area of Vinland. (Contrary to previous reports one winery http://www.wyowine.com/ and another vintner http://www.buffalojumpwinery.com/ actually do exist in the dry windy area Laughing Out Loud )

Tunic by Valgred http://www.valgred.sk/
Belt with Antler fittings and Danelaw Sax by Gullinbursti http://gullinbursti.cz/index.php?lang=en&page=item&id=50



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Last edited by J. Nicolaysen on Sun 12 Oct, 2014 7:42 pm; edited 3 times in total
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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Posts: 677

PostPosted: Sun 12 Oct, 2014 2:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This Wyoming Viking seems somewhat over equipped, if possible. No doubt 2015 discoveries will include a scabbard, and a helmet or shield (who knows, maybe both).


Tunic by Valgred
Norseman Spear, Danish War Axe, Anglo-Saxon Sword by Arms and Armor http://www.arms-n-armor.com/index.html



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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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Posts: 677

PostPosted: Sun 12 Oct, 2014 2:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Closeup of Belt shows excellent craftsmanship. Discoveries of Antler buckles and strap ends are rare, but some have been found in Danelaw lands.


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Photo by Gullinbursti
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Sun 12 Oct, 2014 5:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

ooo! Thanks for taking the photos and sharing with us.
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
Likes: 31 pages

Posts: 677

PostPosted: Sun 12 Oct, 2014 7:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Nathan. There's no one around that I know who has the similar interests to me here. If I wanted to reenact black powder mountain men or 1870's Cavalry or Pony Express riders, I'd be set. So I am just going my own way I guess. There's a few warrior cultures I've always been interested in, and this one is the first kit I'm assembling.

Some of the elements may not match up precisely, but hey, no one around here is complaining. I have a pretty high standard for accuracy given what I am trying to learn about it all, but at a certain point I just go with some things I like. I have no source for outreach or educational type things here anyhow. Only myArmoury and so forth.

So this started with the Danelaw seax by Petr, which I just fell in love with. I asked him to also make a belt that would have some of the same elements of design. He suggested Antler buckle and strap which sounded like a neat thing to try. Through a forum member I learned about Valgred's work. She made an excellent tunic. When I have the rest of the soft kit together, I might get another picture.

The weapons may not be exactly the same time period or design (Peter Szabo's bearded axe seems to be an earlier and more properly Norse, not danelaw area artifact, for example) but I don't know who can argue against having such things. I look forward to playing with the spear the most actually.

I would be happy to hear any suggestions or comments about building this kit or what have you. I have some boots and winningas yet to come and am still learning about the time period and terms. And I can try to get any other pictures or information about anything if anyone is interested, but I am still learning how to take a decent picture.
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Sun 19 Oct, 2014 7:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Got the boots. http://www.bootsbybohemond.net/index.php/shop...oggle-shoe

Very nice and comfortable! I think I will use some elk hide to try to play with shoe making and leather carving. Had a nice pair of elkskin moccasins until a puppy found them. Anyhow, the boots are very nice, but a little plain. I have found some shoes posted on the Wulfheodenas FB page with carving. These are dated from the 6th century. Other examples and reconstructions they have posted have carvings as well, but are earlier than this time period (Danelaw).

https://www.facebook.com/108333802621780/photos/a.123276044460889.19567.108333802621780/341486235973201/?type=3&theater

So, I might try to carve some design to these boots. Objections? Suggestions? I cannot hope to match Petr's work but would like to keep that inspiration from the belt and seax scabbard. I also very much like Jeff Helmes' carving on the little knife sheath.

I should try to find a Ringerike style of carvings in a book somewhere. Please let me know if you have a good one. Remember, there is a good deal of space out here between me and the nearest university or museum. Found a good clothing book as recommended by Wulfheodenas, but I can't afford it at this time... http://www.amazon.com/Clothing-Anglo-Saxon-En...n-Rodgers.

Still a little too early time period besides.
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Matthew Bunker




Location: Somerset UK
Joined: 02 Apr 2009

Posts: 483

PostPosted: Sun 19 Oct, 2014 9:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A couple of things.
Firstly the largest collection of shoe remains that are close to your period of interest come from the heart of the Danelaw, York. I don't recall any of the remains found during the Jorvik excavations being carved in any way but you can check for yourself because the Trust have made the report available to download for free.
It also contains images of knife sheaths so I think you'll find it a rewarding read.

http://www.yorkarchaeology.co.uk/resources/pubs_archive.htm


Secondly, the book you've linked to is for Early Anglo Saxon clothing. It is excellent but it doesn't contain anything of relevence to someone interested in the Danelaw period.
You might be better off with Thor Ewing's book on Viking Clothing or, for an English perspective, Gale Owen Crocker's book on Anglo Saxon clothing which goes up to the 11th century.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Viking-Clothing-Thor-Ewing/dp/0752435876

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dress-Anglo-Saxon-Eng...=pd_cp_b_1

"If a Greek can do it, two Englishman certainly can !"
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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Sun 19 Oct, 2014 3:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Made my evening this lot. I have a 'thing' for bone/antler buckles and strap ends, that's a really nice one. Thanks!
Currently working on projects ranging from Elizabethan pageants to a WW1 Tank, Victorian fairgrounds 1066 events and more. Oh and we joust loads!.. We run over 250 events for English Heritage each year plus many others for Historic Royal Palaces, Historic Scotland, the National Trust and more. If you live in the UK and are interested in working for us just drop us a line with a cv.
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Sun 19 Oct, 2014 4:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you Matthew. I knew the book describes the earlier time period, and almost a very different culture, but found it and Wulfheodenas helpful to think that boots and shoes may have been carved. I had wondered earlier if footwear was ever decorated and when I was trawling the FB page today, I found the reconstructions and the name of the book. I think I will keep that book in mind for a project a few years down the road Happy

The books and link you suggested look very helpful, thank you very much. I will not confuse my Danelaw ideas with the earlier recreations that Wulfheodenas do, but it has been nice to see it and Thegns of Mercia to see how some groups do it so very well.

For a scabbard idea for the A&A sword, I am hesitant to try to make my own, but the works of members here and their knowledge make me think I can try. I may try to get a few antler pieces carved from Petr and do the rest on my own.

Besides a scabbard and more soft kit, I think I will focus on a helmet next year. A shield is more typical, but helmets can be so very nice. I have a few makers in mind. The big question is of course what style. The Gjermundbu is so classic a model, and apparently one of a kind, but is Norse besides. Conical/nasal helms aren't as interesting to me, but match the time period. I really like the Wenceslaus helmet, just that bit of decoration makes it very nice. A bit too rich for the rest of the kit though and obviously the wrong area. Spangenhelm might be more fitting. Coppergate helmet might be a little too early. Choices choices!

Then again, time period might be more flexible than transmission of styles across Viking settled lands. Danelaw might describe the earliest settlements in England of 8th century to the mid 11th century. I wonder if earlier settlers to England held on to such classic viking styles as Mammen, or if Ringerike was brought by later settlers. Hopefully I will learn more about it in these other books.

The research is very fun, and then to try to actualize it with good things made of metal and cloth. If I had seen a different style of Seax I might have gone down a different rabbit-hole. Iron Age to Migration era and Bronze age types have been more fascinating to me, but this is a good place to begin in general I think.

Quote:
Made my evening this lot. I have a 'thing' for bone/antler buckles and strap ends, that's a really nice one. Thanks!
Mark, you are very welcome! It's nice to make others happy as I have gotten a lot of enjoyment from seeing things. Petr had the idea and it was very easy to say yes.
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Wed 22 Oct, 2014 8:09 pm    Post subject: Shoe decoration         Reply with quote

The Leather and Leatherworking In Anglo-Saxon and Medieval York pdf from the York Archaological Society has been a very interesting and immensely useful document for this. Anyone with a similar interest in the time period and craft will get quite a bit of help from it. http://www.yorkarchaeology.co.uk/resources/pubs_archive.htm

There were some finds of decorated footwear in York, however there are some puzzles. Citation from the pdf linked above.

Quote:
Seventy-four shoes exhibited some form of decoration. Impressed linear designs were most common, with 39 examples, occurring principally on the heel-risers of Anglo-Scandinavian shoes. Embroidery was also well represented, 24 finds having decorative stitching on the vamp or top band. Other forms of decoration occurred more rarely...Thirty-nine shoes had been decorated by having a design pressed into the dampened leather with a blunt point, a technique known as tooling and commonly used on knife sheaths and other decorated leatherwork...The shoes were of Anglo-Scandinavian date, occurring in contexts dating from the mid 10th through to the early/mid 11th century at 16-22 Coppergate. Each was decorated on the triangular heel extension of the sole (heel-riser) with an impressed linear motif, often crudely executed. Shoes of differing upper styles, low-cut slip on shoes (Style 2), shoes with one-piece uppers joining with a side seam (Style 3, Fig. 1631) and flap- and toggle-fastened shoes (Style 4), were decorated in this way. The decoration would be unseen by the wearer being only visible from behind and seen to best advantage only when the wearer was kneeling. It is possible that the crude impressions served as some form of maker's mark...The decorated heel-risers display a number of variations on a basic linear decorative theme. Some of the motifs employed are shown in Fig. 1672. At its most basic, the design is simply a series of horizontal parallel lines (15534, or such lines with the addition of diagonals running down from one side (15528). Slightly more complicated, and the most common, is the horizontal and vertical hatched design seen on a number of soles including 15373 and 15441.
pp 3340-3341

The pictures in the document are not the clearest, but worth looking at. There is support for minimal decoration at least, but I'll need to read and try to examine the photos more before I decide what to do.

Placement on the heel-riser for the decoration is puzzling to me. I don't know what to make of that. I've ordered a few more books, some that Matthew Bunker recommended and some others.
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Wed 22 Oct, 2014 8:30 pm    Post subject: Sheath and Scabbard decoration/ Helmet         Reply with quote

The section on sax sheath and sword scabbard was very interesting too; I'm still digesting all of it.

Sax sheaths found in York were very richly decorated while sword scabbards were not. I am not even sure that the strap-slide feature found on many Anglo-Saxon and Viking era scabbards were found in York at all, but I don't know how then they suspended the scabbard. If anyone is interested in sax sheaths, the pdf is very helpful, with very clear pictures.

As far as helms go, I just think the Gjermundbu looks too different for what I want to do here, though I will probably buy a replica someday and, I don't know, put it on a different shelf or something. It's just so sweet. The Coppergate helmet, though found in York, is pretty clearly to my eyes a slightly earlier fashion, derived from the Anglo-Saxon heritage rather than the Danish influx. It is dated a good century before I think I am narrowing things down to anyhow. The Benty-Grange and Valsgarde helms are all way more interesting to me than the Coppergate helm, so if I ever am able to pursue that time period, I would probably go for a replica like that.

The standard conical helm feels too late however. This one here seems about perfect. I hope I can get it or something like it someday: http://www.royaloakarmoury.com/portfolio/conical-spangenhelm/
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Matthew Bunker




Location: Somerset UK
Joined: 02 Apr 2009

Posts: 483

PostPosted: Thu 23 Oct, 2014 11:57 am    Post subject: Re: Sheath and Scabbard decoration/ Helmet         Reply with quote

J. Nicolaysen wrote:
I am not even sure that the strap-slide feature found on many Anglo-Saxon and Viking era scabbards were found in York at all,/


Surface mounted strap slides are a feature of early Anglo Saxon scabbards, not Danelaw era or Viking scabbards.
By that time (in England at least) slides were mounted on (or carved directly into) the wooden core before the leather cover went on. There are plenty of surviving scabbard leathers from the period that attest to this.

In Scandinavia the same seems to be the case. There are no post-Vendel era metal scabbard slides and none of the surviving scabbards or leathers show evidence of them except for those that were mounted below the leather.

A variety of other suspension methods can be gleaned from remains, notable the two examples from the Isle of Mann. Take a look at this pdf by my friend Russel Scott.
http://the-vikings.wdfiles.com/local--files/a...bbards%201

If you're interested in reading more on the subject, the two best books are both by Esther Cameron:
http://www.amazon.com/Sheaths-Scabbards-Engla...1841710652
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Scabbards-Sheaths-Vik...0901777595

Although if I can help out at all, let me know as I've reconstructed a few in my time.

"If a Greek can do it, two Englishman certainly can !"
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J. Nicolaysen




Location: Wyoming
Joined: 03 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Thu 23 Oct, 2014 12:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you again Matthew. As it happens, I posted all that and then found some more late night reading, including some good threads here of course. It will take a while to digest. Found your excellent scabbard based on the Isle of Man discoveries, and Harry Marianakis sent me some good material about suspensions. What do you think about the suspension rings made of antler? I confess I really like the organic antler material and I seem a little stubborn to have it somewhere if not a strap slide. Happy

The Cameron books were recommended in at least one of those threads as well. They look excellent and I hope I can get them.

A google or forum archive search is only as good as one's search terms and specialized vocabulary. I'm stumbling my way around through some of what others have already done, but I sure as hell am learning a lot. I wish I was able to actually see some groups or museums with the right stuff, but that will have to remain a dream for a while. To get valuable input from another forum member who has been there before is a huge boost to research.

One minor project I could do might be sheaths for the Dane axe and the Spear. Both are quite sharp so it would be a very good practical thing regardless of historical accuracy. But to the extent of my abilities I enjoy the historical accuracy the most. Have you made anything like that? Some of your Wulfheodenas spears I have seen had banners, but I hadn't seen a cover yet. Of course the Dane axe is all wrong for the time, but I think it would be a good and safe thing to have anyhow. I have lots of spare elk leather scraps I can use.

Just got some more of the soft kit (winnigas and pants) today. I tried to get them a bit universal for multiple kits, from Historical Enterprises. It will be interesting to how they can fit in here.
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