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J Gibbs




Location: California
Joined: 17 Apr 2014

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PostPosted: Wed 23 Apr, 2014 11:18 pm    Post subject: can you identify my dirk?         Reply with quote

I have a Scottish order of the thistle dirk. It is made by r and h.b. Edinburh. It has the thistle all over the sheath with an order of the thistle badge with the Latin writing, me punity lacessit around another thistle above. I'll send pictures soon. Just seeing if anyone knows from the discription. It also has the knife and fork, a serrated blade and is very sharp. I heard maybe a musician's dirk. Thanks!

J gibbs
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Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Thu 24 Apr, 2014 3:49 am    Post subject: Re: can you identify my dirk?         Reply with quote

J Gibbs wrote:
I have a Scottish order of the thistle dirk. It is made by r and h.b. Edinburh. It has the thistle all over the sheath with an order of the thistle badge with the Latin writing, me punity lacessit around another thistle above. I'll send pictures soon. Just seeing if anyone knows from the discription. It also has the knife and fork, a serrated blade and is very sharp. I heard maybe a musician's dirk. Thanks!

J gibbs


There were and are many dirk makers and many styles of dirks. Photos are absolutely essential for any definitive answer. It sounds like a 19th c. regimental dirk but these types of dirks are still being made so until you send photos it is not possible to say for sure.

Nemo Me Impune Lacessit is the national motto of Scotland, taken from the arms of the Kings of Scots. It was commonly etched on dirk blades.

Send photos.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Todd Salazar





Joined: 03 Dec 2003
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 79

PostPosted: Wed 28 May, 2014 11:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I also own a R. & H. B. Kirkwood scottish dirk as well (please see the attached images). The gentleman that it was custom made for Lord Arthur Hay, the 9th Marquess of Tweeddale who was a well known ornithologist in his day. Lord Arthur Hay died from pneumonia in 1878. From what I've found over the years is that the working period for Robert & Henry Bruce Kirkwood appears to be 1872 until 1915. However, the business appears to have been continued by the oddly named Elizabeth 'Henry' Kirkwood, who continued to submit work to the Edinburgh Assay Office until 1965. Also, Robert & Henry Bruce Kirkwood both served their apprenticeships under their father James Kirkwood, whose working period was 1834-1872. At the last registration of R. & H. B. Kirkwood, Henry Bruce Kirkwood was listed as sole partner (some of the above text was taken from http://www.925-1000.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=61&t=29237). I also found the following bit of information about R. & H. B. Kirkwood after an internet search:

International Exhibiton, Glasgow, 1888

An exhibition in Scotland without some distinctly national exhibits would be an anomaly, but this is averted by the display of Messrs. R. & H. B. Kirkwood, Thistle Street, Edinburgh; a case of Highland ornaments of similar character and design to that which attracted so much attention in the Edinburgh Exhibition. The officers' ornaments and badges of most of the Highland regiments are arranged in the lower portion of the case. We rather fancy from their gorgeous appearance that our officers must be worth the plundering if they go forth on a campaign thus equipped. The crest brooches of the Highland clans, facsimiles of some of the famous historic brooches shown in the Bishop's Castle collection, and a unique display of sporrans, dirks and belt furniture—most of it reproductions of fine old designs—go to make up an exhibit unsurpassed in its own line in the whole exhibition.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st October 1888

I hope the above helps.

Thanks,
Todd



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Hay dirk photo #1

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Hay dirk photo #2

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Hay dirk photo #3

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Hay dirk photo #4


Last edited by Todd Salazar on Sat 31 May, 2014 11:30 am; edited 1 time in total
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Todd Salazar





Joined: 03 Dec 2003
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 79

PostPosted: Wed 28 May, 2014 12:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

There were several Scottish regiments in the 19th century through to the 20th century that used the "Nemo me punity lacessit" as their motto. It's much more likely that you dirk came from somebody that serverd in one of these Scottish regiments in the 19th century. It definitely isn't a Jacobite dirk (circa 1745).

Thanks,
Todd
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Todd Salazar





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Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 79

PostPosted: Wed 28 May, 2014 12:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I just found the interesting photo below of a glass display for R. & H. B. Kirkwood in their day! Big Grin


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Kirkwood-Glas-Exhib-1888.jpg

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Todd Salazar





Joined: 03 Dec 2003
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 79

PostPosted: Wed 28 May, 2014 1:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I guess that the Victorians really liked to show off! Eek!
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Todd Salazar





Joined: 03 Dec 2003
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 79

PostPosted: Thu 29 May, 2014 7:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some other R. & H. B. Kirkwood items that I own. These items are all silver and etched by hand. They are also all matching in design and are part of a complete set. To put it lightly, the Kirkwood family did quality work.


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Kirkwood brooch.jpg
Fly plaid brooch dated 1898.

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Kirkwood shoe buckles.jpg
Shoe buckles dated 1898.
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