Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Lessons on sword collecting Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Dave Hahn




Location: Toronto, Canada
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 80

PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2004 2:13 pm    Post subject: Lessons on sword collecting         Reply with quote

Over the several years I have been involved in sword collecting, I realize now that over time, tastes evolve and collections rarely remain static. This can be attributed to many factors but the one that has struck me the most was my "search" for a favourite sword type.

I'm hoping that the more seasoned collectors out there can chime in on some of the lessons learned over the years...

What I have personally learned (some points) is the following...

don't try and fill the sword void by being seduced by less expensive brands or variety.

maybe not everyone has felt this way, but if you have been an avid collector of all things celtic or roman or type XIV & XIIa, that single katana becomes more and more out of place.

swords as a general rule, particularly production, are not investments.

swords are more fun if you actual use them, or to fully appreciate them, learn proper training!

for some, buy the most expensive sword you can afford. sometimes 4 high quality pieces in the category you focus on can outweigh several lesser swords in various categories. The "focussed quality" vs "varied quantity" debate, your personal experiences may differ.

I truly believe that all sword collectors at one point or another, try to design their "personal" sword.

Custom swords are indeed a precarious road, but the rewards are often the greatest.

There will be a time when you finally obtain the sword you have lusted for a long while, and than turn around and put it away to be handled once in a while.

Chances are, you may get ripped off at least once. Let the community know so that others may be spared.

If a sword isn't for you, and you eventually sell it. Try hard and remember not to repeat the same mistake. Some people struggle to find their focus. They will buy swords but never really connect. Yes, you may have many high quality, historically accurate pieces, but perhaps it is the fantasy focus that may catch your attention the most. Don't FORCE yourself to like a certain type.

Don't go into debt to populate your collection. When you find out how to follow this lesson successfully, please email me and tell me how.


Just my 3 cents Cdn.

Try not to take yourself too seriously.
View user's profile Send private message
Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 5,678

PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2004 8:39 pm    Post subject: Re: Lessons on sword collecting         Reply with quote

Quote:
don't try and fill the sword void by being seduced by less expensive brands or variety.


This in itself is very good advice. We've all been guilty of it. We get the itch to have a new toy to play with so we buy something cheap and quick, only later to think "Why did I buy that?" In the end it's best to wait and save for what you really want. You'll get rid of the cheap fix in the end anyway. Patience is a virtue and some of us are more virtuous than others. Big Grin

Quote:
maybe not everyone has felt this way, but if you have been an avid collector of all things celtic or roman or type XIV & XIIa, that single katana becomes more and more out of place.


I think we all go through phases in our collecting odyssey. We start off having a definite image in our minds of the "perfect" sword, so we go in search of it. We don't find it obviously so we move onto the "one of everything" phase. Sooner or later we settle down and focus on what really interests us. After a quarter of a century of collecting I've found that my preferences have come full circle and the things that interest me now are the same as in the begining. In the end maybe my desires never really changed at all. Maybe everything else was just a distraction. I would have saved myself a lot of money if I'd realized that years ago.

Quote:
swords as a general rule, particularly production, are not investments.


Absolutely. Yes, the work of a few well known makers may increase in value over time, but it won't be enough to retire on or to put the kids through college. People who approach this hobby with this mindset tend to do so with every other aspect of their lives. "What's the resale going to be on my brand new car?" I just drive mine tell it falls appart and then get another. "How much is my house appreciating in value?" Hell, I'm just glad the roof doesn't leak and the neighbors are decent. This kind of fixation on monetary gain is one of the biggest problems with American culture. We let the intrinsic value of our "stuff" define us. If I light a match and let it all burn I'll be the same person I was yesterday. I just won't have as much crap to put away. This hobby is full of so much passion and emotion. Treating a sword like a blue chip stock ruins it as far as I'm concerned.

Quote:
swords are more fun if you actual use them, or to fully appreciate them, learn proper training!


Yes and no. I can appreciate a fine painting but I'm no artist. I can appreciate the performance of fighter plane but I've never flown one. Appreciation and understanding are two different things. To truly understand the sword, why it's made the way it is and how the makers of old overcame obstacles, it is extremely helpful to have at least a basic knowledge of it's use. As you go deeper into the actual use of the sword you gain a greater appreciation of the real skill it takes to make one. The true art in any sword lies in it's form and proportion, not in it's embellishment.

Quote:
for some, buy the most expensive sword you can afford. sometimes 4 high quality pieces in the category you focus on can outweigh several lesser swords in various categories. The "focussed quality" vs "varied quantity" debate, your personal experiences may differ.


I've come to realize this also. My collection is now far smaller than it once was but the quality is far higher. I've come to believe in the "Better to have one good one than a dozen okay ones." philosophy. It is hard to suppress that attraction to shiny things though.

Quote:
I truly believe that all sword collectors at one point or another, try to design their "personal" sword.


Once again, yes and no. I for one have never believed in reinventing the wheel. Anything we may think of has already been tried in the past. There's really nothing unique. However, it is nice to have a sword that speaks to us on a personal level. I do own one sword that could have been made to my personal design. It displays all of the features, however minute, that I've always desired in a sword of that kind. From the blade and hilt design all the way down to the scabbard chape. The maker and I had never met prior to the sale so whether it was fate or blind luck is anyone's guess.

Quote:
Custom swords are indeed a precarious road, but the rewards are often the greatest.


I would agree. I own both both and find that the production stuff just doesn't have that intangible soul (or whatever) that the good custom stuff does. Maybe it's just the emotional satisfaction of owning a one of a kind creation, who knows. I value my production swords for what they are and this fact doesn't lessen their value in my mind, but they are what they are. I don't think my friends in the production business would disagree with me either. If my house was burning down around me and I could only grab one it wouldn't be a production piece.

Quote:
There will be a time when you finally obtain the sword you have lusted for a long while, and than turn around and put it away to be handled once in a while.


That's a strange one isn't it? Maybe just knowing that you have it available is enough.Often the desire to possess something is greater than the actual obtaining of it.

Quote:
Chances are, you may get ripped off at least once. Let the community know so that others may be spared.


That's an unfortunate fact of not only the sword world but also of life as we know it. Just make sure that you're consistent with your praise and condemnation. All too often we see people accusing a maker of being the anti-christ incarnate. But once they finally have their toy in hand all is forgiven and the guy has now parted the Red Sea. Be consistent and don't let your sense of gratification outweigh your sense of fair play. I've been ripped off only once and I wouldn't walk across the street to piss on the bastard if he was on fire. But that's just me.

Quote:
If a sword isn't for you, and you eventually sell it. Try hard and remember not to repeat the same mistake. Some people struggle to find their focus. They will buy swords but never really connect. Yes, you may have many high quality, historically accurate pieces, but perhaps it is the fantasy focus that may catch your attention the most. Don't FORCE yourself to like a certain type.


Yes, don't be overly influenced by current trends. Don't be another cow in the herd. Buy what speaks to you. It's your money and you don't have to justify your preferences to anyone. If you bow to peer pressure you'll only regret it in the end. Remember, this is just a hobby not a religion. The fact of "Just because I like it." is all you really need. On the other hand don't take it personally when someone disagrees with your choice. Like I said, it's a hobby not a religion. We ain't curing cancer here folks.

Quote:
Don't go into debt to populate your collection. When you find out how to follow this lesson successfully, please email me and tell me how.


I'm afraid that I can't help you with that one grasshopper.
Big Grin

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
View user's profile Send private message
Allen W





Joined: 02 Mar 2004

Posts: 285

PostPosted: Sun 19 Dec, 2004 7:08 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

While I agree with this thread in general I disagree about avoiding cheap pieces at least until you have found your focus. So long as they are still functionally weapons(Windless, Del Tin, or Hanwei that I have experience with on the low end) one will go through a greater variety of weapons early in their hobby laying the foundation to focus their interests and the context of their use. The cheap pieces are also far more likely to be used resulting in a swordsman/collector better able to determine what he truly wants.

I believe Patrick and many others have said the same in previous posts but it seems worth restating.
View user's profile Send private message
Greyson Brown




Location: Windsor, Colorado
Joined: 22 Nov 2004
Reading list: 15 books

Posts: 790

PostPosted: Tue 21 Dec, 2004 2:09 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

As one whose collection consists entirely of the "cheap" production pieces, I have to agree with Allan. The sad truth; my most expensive/highest quality pieces are Windlass. BUT, this has allowed me to try different sword types, and features. True, my interests in sword collecting are largely driven by my interest in specific historical individuals and conflicts, but I feel that the experiences offered by my cheap swords are invaluable. I would hate to have spent the money for a custom Oakeshott XVa (I once thought that was my ideal sword type), to discover that XVa's are not everything I once thought.

I don't disagree with the original statement, but I think I would do it the same way, if I had it to over again.

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
View user's profile Send private message
Dave Hahn




Location: Toronto, Canada
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 80

PostPosted: Tue 21 Dec, 2004 5:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

i welcome all experiences and should have stated that the above were my own opinions.

nothing wrong with what you like, whether it is a type or manufacturer, one point i tried to make is find out what makes you happy and stick with it.

Try not to take yourself too seriously.
View user's profile Send private message
Jack McGregor Lynn





Joined: 12 Oct 2004

Posts: 44

PostPosted: Tue 21 Dec, 2004 9:17 pm    Post subject: Re: Lessons on sword collecting         Reply with quote

Dave Hahn wrote:
don't try and fill the sword void by being seduced by less expensive brands or variety.
.

I think that you are right to say that it is quite possible to be seduced into buying too many low quality swords, but I don't think that the word 'cheap' is quite fair. You shouldn't judge swords just on price. Price can be a tool for gauging the time and expense that went into making a sword, but every so often I have found truly wonderful deals on good swords that are worth a collectors time, especially if he is on a budget.
View user's profile Send private message
Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 5,678

PostPosted: Tue 21 Dec, 2004 11:45 pm    Post subject: Re: Lessons on sword collecting         Reply with quote

Jack McGregor Lynn wrote:
Dave Hahn wrote:
don't try and fill the sword void by being seduced by less expensive brands or variety.
.

I think that you are right to say that it is quite possible to be seduced into buying too many low quality swords, but I don't think that the word 'cheap' is quite fair. You shouldn't judge swords just on price. Price can be a tool for gauging the time and expense that went into making a sword, but every so often I have found truly wonderful deals on good swords that are worth a collectors time, especially if he is on a budget.


To be correct Dave didn't use the word "cheap" anywhere in his post.

I think we're in danger of having this thread veer off into an area where people feel the need to defend their personal choices. This really isn't very productive, nor does it fulfill the intent of the Dave's original post (I believe).
This returns to one of the points I tried to make with my initial post:

Quote:
The fact of "Just because I like it." is all you really need. On the other hand don't take it personally when someone disagrees with your choice. Like I said, it's a hobby not a religion. We ain't curing cancer here folks.


I believe that Dave was trying to say this: You see a beautiful custom sword for $1500.00 You then surf around the net and find a similar sword (which is in reality a knock-off of the custom job) for $150.00. Don't try to convince yourself that the "less expensive" sword is the equal of the custom. Afterall they look alike right? Going down this road only leads to disappointment and needless expense. You simply aren't going to get something for nothing.

There are keys to gaining personal satisfaction in this hobby.

First: Set your own parameters. Decide how much you want to spend and where you want to spend it. Some people are perfectly happy spending $200 on a sword. Others will look askance at anything below $2000. Decide where you fit into that make-up and work from there.

Second: Be realistic. You simply aren't going to get an outstanding sword for that $200. The old adage of "You get what you pay for" holds true in the sword world. You may find a decent deal within that $200 price nitch, but that's only in comparison to other swords within that price point. Decorative swords generally fall within a price point, usable swords within another, and excellent swords another. Very rarely if at all do the categories overlap. Quite often owners off a Practical Katana will argue that their sword is an excellent value and is the equal of a Rick Barrett custom Katana. (No intended slam own PPK owners, it's just an example) Of course they've never even seen an RB Katana much less handled one. Never the less they make an academic discussion into a personal one by trying to argue in defense of their choice.

Third: Educate yourself. Knowledge is power. It's your money. Spend as much of it where and when you choose. Just make sure that you're well informed on the relevant subject matter so that you can effectively work within the framework that you set for yourself.

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
View user's profile Send private message
Lee O'Hagan




Location: Northamptonshire,England
Joined: 30 Sep 2003
Likes: 5 pages

Posts: 509

PostPosted: Wed 22 Dec, 2004 5:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hmm cost vs value,
Probably a whole thread on it's own,
As to the preffered types,
I found that following advice i'd read here and elswhere of actually getting out there to different shows and meets that you get to handle/look over alot more,
A fine example being,
I went to a large fair specifically looking for one or two Del tin models,
The printed info i had read all looked good,
But on handling said models,they just didnt do anything for me,
But,the one or two of the line i had dismissed out of hand for one reason or another, left a far more positive impression,
so much so i was dissapointed to find out the ones i liked were pre order to be collected,
and then the ten month order time mentioned Cry

As to the full custom route,
Yes they can be expensive, but not always,
I've seen what alot would consider to be higher end production priced at more than a commisioned custom,
I sometimes wonder if people are scared off by the custom market before asking for a price,
And that would be before you even consider pre-owned,
But thats just my own thoughts, Wink

Patrick,
Just because i like it,
That to me is the most important reason of all Happy
View user's profile Send private message
James Holczer




Location: Central New Jersey
Joined: 29 Dec 2003
Likes: 1 page
Reading list: 10 books

Posts: 101

PostPosted: Wed 22 Dec, 2004 6:49 am    Post subject: Lessons in sword collecting         Reply with quote

I think what Patrick said about education should be first and foremost when it comes to collecting swords or just about anything. Education is the key, if you don't know what your buying ,then your just throwing your money in the street.
But this is a lesson that I think most of us learn the hard way. So don't be afraid to do a little research, or ask questions
regardless of price category.
View user's profile Send private message
Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 5,678

PostPosted: Wed 22 Dec, 2004 8:01 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quote:
So don't be afraid to do a little research, or ask questions
regardless of price category.


This brings up another point. Not one that concerns those asking for advice but rather those who are dispensing it.

All too often we see people on-line asking for advice on the best $200 sword available. We then see a lot of replies like "Those are all crap, but here's some great $2000 choices". While the gist of the comment may be true it doesn't help the questioner with the issue at hand, buying the best $200 sword possible. It may very well be that the buyer simply can't afford anything other than a $200 sword. There were certainly times in my life when I couldn't even do that. It may come as a shock but there are alot of people who just don't want to spend any more than that. They've set that framework and are trying to work within it. We really need to remember to focus on the question being asked and not let our own personal bias get too heavily involved.

"In valor there is hope.".................. Tacitus
View user's profile Send private message
Russ Mitchell




Location: Irving, TX
Joined: 01 Mar 2004

Posts: 51

PostPosted: Wed 22 Dec, 2004 9:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

And, if they DO want to spend more than that, it's pretty much because they know what they want?

My sword collection is puny. Some antique sabres, a few replica sabres, and three production blades. Those blades aren't high-end, but they're good, and fit my purposes, and their maker will likely be my go-to man for sabres, given how shabbily I've been treated by the competition. Knowing who you don't want to do business with is almost as important as knowing with whom you DO.

But as part of knowing what you want, and I think this generalizes to any arms collection... it makes a heck of a difference if you can get access to a custom smith, and it's really worth the effort once you find a guy willing to trust that you have a clue what you're talking about, even if it goes against what he's accustomed to... in my case, the vast majority of what I have isn't swords, but rather axes, maces, spear heads, arrowheads, military picks, etcetera. Not one of which can be purchased on the production market. In each case, as a corollary to the custom-vs-production, if you know what you want, a smith willing to let you make an ass of yourself if you're wrong is a WONDERFUL thing...

10,000 lemmings can't be wrong.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Don Stanko




Location: ohio
Joined: 27 Apr 2004
Reading list: 478 books

Posts: 227

PostPosted: Wed 22 Dec, 2004 6:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

For me, sword collecting is all about enjoyment and learning. Being able to completely relax with something I enjoy doing. However, a good friend once told me something that I could not deny. He said, "sword collecting is a sickness, no matter how many weapons you own, or have owned, you can still get that overwhelming desire for a spectacular sword that has you going for your wallet." If I could change anything, I would practice just a bit of moderation.
View user's profile Send private message
Dave Hahn




Location: Toronto, Canada
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 80

PostPosted: Wed 22 Dec, 2004 6:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quote:
Yes and no. I can appreciate a fine painting but I'm no artist. I can appreciate the performance of fighter plane but I've never flown one. Appreciation and understanding are two different things. To truly understand the sword, why it's made the way it is and how the makers of old overcame obstacles, it is extremely helpful to have at least a basic knowledge of it's use. As you go deeper into the actual use of the sword you gain a greater appreciation of the real skill it takes to make one. The true art in any sword lies in it's form and proportion, not in it's embellishment.



This is a great point and I completely missed this one! I have found that my enjoyment of this great hobby of ours reached a whole new level by understanding things such as construction and purpose. Understanding blade geometry and why it was made a certain way and the historical context of swords really evolved my appreciation for swords and armour.

Try not to take yourself too seriously.
View user's profile Send private message
Chuck Wyatt





Joined: 31 Mar 2004
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 62

PostPosted: Thu 23 Dec, 2004 7:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This has been an interesting thread; there is no real right answer. Collecting to some means owning three $2000.00 swords while others desire seven $250.00 swords. It all comes down to what makes you happy, my goal is to start antiquing and rewrapping the grips on some lower end functional weapons, while I am slowly saving up for a high end sword to be the center piece of my collection. Thatís what is working for me.

My only advice would be too actually hold the sword before buying or ordering, even if itís a similar style, just to make sure you feel the connection with the sword style. Case in point: I bought a two handed claymore before ever seeing one in person, once I held it I knew this was not for me also I used to think basket hilts looked clumsy and heavy until I held one. Silly me.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Robert W. Betten




Location: Brisbane, Australia
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 150

PostPosted: Thu 23 Dec, 2004 7:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I bought a custom sword now my standards are too costly...anyone else notice this in there collecting? I even sold all my lower end stuff Cry
*!*
"If the people we love are taken from us,
the way they live on is to never stop loving
them. Buildings burn, people die, but real
love is forever."
- Sarah 'The Crow'
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Errol Chua




Location: Seattle, WA
Joined: 07 Dec 2004

Posts: 3

PostPosted: Mon 24 Jan, 2005 8:35 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi, I'm new and I agree with everything the thread originator stated, but would like to add my own 2 cents.

I got a 'starter set' with fencing mask, gloves, undergarment and (rapier) sword for about $300. Yeah, I went for economics- "R9 Rapier" really was the best looking sword on the website anway, imho. At first I was just freakin' happy with my sword; it was my first sword, how could I not love it like a baby? I practiced even more than I had before, I showed it around, I used it to change the channels on the T.V. instead of the remote (it's safety tipped, don't worry, my T.V. is just fine). Long winded post short, my sword was, to me, the bestest, greatest and coolest sword in the whole darn gosh world.

After awhile though, I begin to become somewhat disappointed with it's performance. The blade would twist during sparring, the balance, never did change, but it begain to feel really heavy and unbalanced compared to other peoples' swords. Worst of all, and this gets my goat every single freakin' bloody time, the blade would not align with the handle upon retightening. Inferior workmanship was the culprit. Guard pieces welded at angles not completely adjacent, resulting in a poor fit in areas; a guard hole that was too big, resulting in the freakin' bloody blade twisting out of alignment; a tang that was somewhat "not uniform", resulting in rubbing and general unsnug fitting in places, and those were just the highlights. Oh, how I cursed and swore then.

I still loved my sword though. So the day after Christmas (or so), I took some Christmas Money to Sears and bought a classy filing kit. Ironically, I hurt my hand on the hand guard filing. That took care of the "not uniform" tang. Then I went to 'visit' a friend who had a braiser (that welding torch thingie) and spent the whole night filling up the oversized hole. My friend's Dad also happened to have a polishing wheel, so I managed to even out some of the 'angular'ly challenged' parts of my hand guard and tang for a much better fit. SInce then, I have got a custom handle carved, for a better grip; the blade shifted down into the guard more, for a balance point that I like better, and best of all, I cut my own leather for spacers, for a more snugly fitting blade that doesn't freakin' blood twist when I tighten the pommel.

I love my sword all over again. My sword is, again, to me, the bestest, greatest and coolest sword in the whole darn gosh world. I love it to pieces, again. I probably won't be selling this sword. It means too much to me. It may have began life as a cheap 'beginner' sword, but with all the time I've spent working on it, it has become a truly custom sword; there is no other like it in the world. I took it, I modified it, and it's now really just "me". I guess some other swords cannot be worked on, and I'm sorry about that, but all I'm trying to say is that sometimes, the reward of owning a sword is working on it.

Thank you for your time and have a nice day. Happy

E.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Mike Capanelli




Location: Whitestone, NY
Joined: 04 Sep 2004
Likes: 4 pages
Reading list: 5 books

Posts: 702

PostPosted: Tue 25 Jan, 2005 8:15 am    Post subject: don't go into debt.............................         Reply with quote

hi dave. about that debt thing, i started an ebay store to support my sword addiction. thats about the only way i'll stay out of debt with this bro!! and as for the quality verses quantity, i'd go with quality. i'd much rather have my 5 albions then 10 windless. but thats just my opionin, and you know what opionins are like. Laughing Out Loud and definitely anyone interseted in medieval should at some point get a little training. you get a whole new respect for the sword that your holding when you know how to properly use it to some extent.
View user's profile Send private message
Trevor S.




Location: Mesa, AZ
Joined: 22 Dec 2003

Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue 01 Feb, 2005 10:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Lessons on sword collecting         Reply with quote

Dave Hahn wrote:

don't try and fill the sword void by being seduced by less expensive brands or variety.


Hey you have to some cheap stuff to beat around with your friends. Big Grin I mean really cheap.

I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less
than half of you half as well as you deserve. ---Bilbo Baggins
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Tue 01 Feb, 2005 10:37 pm    Post subject: Re: Lessons on sword collecting         Reply with quote

Trevor S. wrote:
Dave Hahn wrote:

don't try and fill the sword void by being seduced by less expensive brands or variety.


Hey you have to some cheap stuff to beat around with your friends. Big Grin I mean really cheap.


This is just my opinion, but I'm not sure I'd agree with that. I'd question what beating around cheap swords with your friends will really teach you about swordmanship, historical combat, etc. Perhaps more importantly, I'd be concerned about the safety of the people involved with beating around cheap swords, too. That's not something I'd feel particularly comfortable suggesting to a lot of people.

.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Trevor S.




Location: Mesa, AZ
Joined: 22 Dec 2003

Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue 01 Feb, 2005 10:43 pm    Post subject: Re: Lessons on sword collecting         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:

This is just my opinion, but I'm not sure I'd agree with that. I'd question what beating around cheap swords with your friends will really teach you about swordmanship, historical combat, etc. Perhaps more importantly, I'd be concerned about the safety of the people involved with beating around cheap swords, too. That's not something I'd feel particularly comfortable suggesting to a lot of people.

Maybe beating was the wrong word to use. Ture, we probably don't learn anything, but it sure is fun. beside PVC pipe works just as well... and is cheaper too. Happy

I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less
than half of you half as well as you deserve. ---Bilbo Baggins
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Lessons on sword collecting
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum