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Foong Chen Hong




Location: Malaysia
Joined: 18 May 2013
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PostPosted: Sat 26 Oct, 2013 5:30 am    Post subject: Invented halbard         Reply with quote

I am interested at this and not sure whether they appeared in 15 or 16 century.

http://www.wulflund.com/weapons/axes-poleweap...apon.html/

So who designed them?

Descanse En Paz
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Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
Joined: 07 Aug 2011

Posts: 580

PostPosted: Sat 26 Oct, 2013 9:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

halberd is hard to define as to when they appeared. the term halberd has been around for quite a while, Nigel's saga defines one of the hero's primary weapon as halberd - some kind of spear in its use but the term halberd i think means something like staff axe.

its such a diverse weapon that seems to have been adopted by most European cultures that i don't think you can attribute just one culture with the development of them - moreover each culture seems to have made their own style.
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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

Posts: 1,436

PostPosted: Sun 27 Oct, 2013 2:25 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

i can just tell, that, that design is 16th century onwards, that design started to appear around the time halberds became symols of rank and office more than being front line weapons, although make no mistake it would still hurt
I am pretty certain that is 16th century, probably the second half of the century i would guess.
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Mark Griffin




Location: The Welsh Marches, in the hills above Newtown, Powys.
Joined: 28 Dec 2006

Posts: 801

PostPosted: Sun 27 Oct, 2013 11:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Its a pretty standard late 16th to mid 17th cent pattern.

There is a soldier carrying one on this re-enactment article, scroll down the page to find him
[url]
http://www.oocities.org/pentagon/quarters/890...html[/url]

He's in one of the London Trained Bands and the pic is approx 1580's

I wouldn't use it much earlier than that, but they do a nice swiss style one here which is great for 15th cent plus a wee bit earlier and later.

http://www.wulflund.com/weapons/axes-poleweap...apon.html/
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Matt Corbin




Location: U.S.A.
Joined: 16 Jan 2004
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PostPosted: Sun 27 Oct, 2013 3:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

As was stated above, that's a pretty standard type of halberd. Here's a very similar one I photographed at the Higgins Armory recently.


“This was the age of heroes, some legendary, some historical . . . the misty borderland of history where fact and legend mingle.”
- R. Ewart Oakeshott
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Gregg Sobocinski




Location: Michigan
Joined: 21 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Sun 27 Oct, 2013 8:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If you're truly interested in the history of halberds, you will likely want to seek a copy of the book Hafted Weapons of Medieval and Renaissance Europe: The evolution of European staff weapons between 1200 and 1650, by John Waldman (2005). Waldman spends a lot of time covering the development and construction of the halberd, starting with the bardiche and proceeding through many forms of this weapon type.

If you can't get ahold of this book, try your nearest university. If it's not in the catalog, it's probably something they can borrow from somewhere else; possibly even an electronic copy.
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Foong Chen Hong




Location: Malaysia
Joined: 18 May 2013
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Posts: 150

PostPosted: Mon 28 Oct, 2013 5:18 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

thank you for telling me such a book, I doubt university in Malaysia would have it. So my best option is order it online
Descanse En Paz
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Gregg Sobocinski




Location: Michigan
Joined: 21 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Mon 28 Oct, 2013 10:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I didn't mention that I agree with previous posters that the top halberd on the link you posted is likely late 16thC or 17C according to information in Waldman's book. I was distracted by the other halberds present on the page, but I assume you are interested in the top one.
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Victor R.




Location: Spring, Texas
Joined: 28 Jan 2008
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PostPosted: Mon 28 Oct, 2013 10:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The item listed here:

http://www.lutel-handicraft.com/?p=productsMo...berd-20017

...is late XIVth century inspired. I have a copy of it. Well built piece. Comes unhafted; socket has 1 3/8" (~3.49cm) inner diameter. They send modern wood screws for mounting (blackened), so you would want to find some iron nails if you want a more period mount.

Lutel is also Czeck. Item listed for 175 Euro or $240.
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