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Edward Lee




Location: New York
Joined: 05 Jul 2013

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Mon 22 Jul, 2013 10:24 pm    Post subject: Saber with pipeline?         Reply with quote

Hello guys!

I recently bought a saber with pipeline, and I can't make any cuts with it. I was wondering are these sabers suppose to be some sort of replacement for cavalry lance? Can these be used on foot with dueling saber techniques? Thanks!

Sincerely
Ed
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Glen A Cleeton




Location: Nipmuc USA
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 1,838

PostPosted: Mon 22 Jul, 2013 11:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Can you be a little more specific in regard to your sword?.

Pipe back blades came and went, in terms of use in the field. There are very slight swords and there were heavier cavalry swords but the truer lance substitutes tended to be straight. The compromise designs ended up to favoring straight swords by the end of the 19th century. Pipe back bladed swords reached all branches of service and indeed, the thought for a stiffer blade in thrusting. In the US, you have regulation cavalry swords and naval swords with pipe back blades.

Cheers

GC
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Jonathan Hopkins




PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 12:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Glen is right on. The pipe back blade was introduced in Britain c.1810, and was the regulation blade type for officers from 1821-1845. The pipe back blade remained popular in other European countries into the early 20th century. What type of sword have you been using to cut?
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Edward Lee




Location: New York
Joined: 05 Jul 2013

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 1:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

My apology guys, should have been more specific. The sword I was trying to cut with was the 1852 Prussian saber made by Cold Steel.
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Glen A Cleeton




Location: Nipmuc USA
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 1,838

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 1:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

is this the first sword you have cut with?

What are you trying to cut?

Please be as specific as possible.

Cheers

GC
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Edward Lee




Location: New York
Joined: 05 Jul 2013

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 1:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Glen A Cleeton wrote:
is this the first sword you have cut with?

What are you trying to cut?

Please be as specific as possible.

Cheers

GC


This is the first saber I tried to cut with, bought a rack of ribs and tried to cut it.
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Glen A Cleeton




Location: Nipmuc USA
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 1,838

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 1:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Edward Lee wrote:
Glen A Cleeton wrote:
is this the first sword you have cut with?

What are you trying to cut?

Please be as specific as possible.

Cheers

GC


This is the first saber I tried to cut with, bought a rack of ribs and tried to cut it.


Twenty questions ahead.

Pork? Beef? Lamb? What? Bones and all? Hanging? Laid down and chopping like a cleaver? Were you expecting to cut bone easily?

I'll bet it thrust through between two ribs pretty easy.

Start by working with your own form and water bottles.

What other swords have you been cutting with? What have you been successfully cutting?

Cheers

GC
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Edward Lee




Location: New York
Joined: 05 Jul 2013

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 2:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Glen A Cleeton wrote:
Edward Lee wrote:
Glen A Cleeton wrote:
is this the first sword you have cut with?

What are you trying to cut?

Please be as specific as possible.

Cheers

GC


This is the first saber I tried to cut with, bought a rack of ribs and tried to cut it.


Twenty questions ahead.

Pork? Beef? Lamb? What? Bones and all? Hanging? Laid down and chopping like a cleaver? Were you expecting to cut bone easily?

I'll bet it thrust through between two ribs pretty easy.

Start by working with your own form and water bottles.

What other swords have you been cutting with? What have you been successfully cutting?

Cheers

GC


Pork with bones, placed on a table chopping it like a cleaver, I was trying to do some damage to the meat instead of the bone, maybe I should've gone with prok chops, god forbid me wasting food like that. Yes thrust is very easy, without effort.
I've cut with windlass Sticklestead, Shusqua,and Hanwei Saxon etc. Most of the sword I cut before were broad, heavy blades, and the targets were water bottles and cardboards, never chunk of meat.
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Glen A Cleeton




Location: Nipmuc USA
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 1,838

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 2:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I used to like empty pasteboard cartons (crackers, cereal, etc) to tune technique on narrower single hand swords. Don't forget to draw the blade somewhat.

Your experiment with the pork ribs probably falls into the category of unrealistic expectation. Buy a big ham and slash at it targeting the meaty part. Or make a scarecrow, complete with wool clothing to emulate cutting/slashing at cavalry. I think you will find in most cases with sabres, targeting bare flesh was the most effective. Look up some videos of Arab executions if wondering how easy a head can come off but also consider them an aimed blow at a stationary target. Practice makes perfect, at any rate.


I am sure the Cold Steel 1852 can handle water bottles ok.

If you look at Cold Steel youtube videos, all the meat cuts are done with hanging targets (as far as I know).

Cheers

GC
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Edward Lee




Location: New York
Joined: 05 Jul 2013

Posts: 313

PostPosted: Tue 23 Jul, 2013 2:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Glen A Cleeton wrote:
I used to like empty pasteboard cartons (crackers, cereal, etc) to tune technique on narrower single hand swords. Don't forget to draw the blade somewhat.

Your experiment with the pork ribs probably falls into the category of unrealistic expectation. Buy a big ham and slash at it targeting the meaty part. Or make a scarecrow, complete with wool clothing to emulate cutting/slashing at cavalry. I think you will find in most cases with sabres, targeting bare flesh was the most effective. Look up some videos of Arab executions if wondering how easy a head can come off but also consider them an aimed blow at a stationary target. Practice makes perfect, at any rate.


I am sure the Cold Steel 1852 can handle water bottles ok.

If you look at Cold Steel youtube videos, all the meat cuts are done with hanging targets (as far as I know).

Cheers

GC


Thanks for the info! Really appreciated it.

Ed
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Lewis Ballard




Location: Houston, TX
Joined: 27 Dec 2009

Posts: 66

PostPosted: Wed 24 Jul, 2013 4:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Edward:

Welcome aboard! (I'm practically brand new as well.) As you get more practice with it, I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts on the Cold Steel 1852. I'm a junior member of the tiny minority of sword enthusiasts who think sabers are the coolest thing ever, and I've looked at the 1852 with greedy eyes in the past.

Here's a short treatise on the pipeback saber from over at SBG: http://www.sword-forum.com/viewtopic.php?f=12...view=print

Best,

Lewis
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Glen A Cleeton




Location: Nipmuc USA
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 1,838

PostPosted: Wed 24 Jul, 2013 5:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Pipe back quill point Happy
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