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Waldemar Duszka




Location: Polska
Joined: 25 May 2012

Posts: 57

PostPosted: Sat 20 Jul, 2013 4:06 am    Post subject: Coat the gizarme.         Reply with quote

Hi
In the description of the gizarme it says that the coat of arms on it was acid digested ........ it's probably a mistake.
In my opinion, this groove is definitely the stylus.
What do you think?
Ibor.



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Ibor
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Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
Joined: 07 Aug 2011

Posts: 580

PostPosted: Sat 20 Jul, 2013 9:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

its dated to the 1500 -1600 time period, well its not impossible that acids were used. by this time engraving was done on metal plates (usually copper or bronze) using a needle like tool and then mild acid applied to etch. the acid would sit in the lines of the drawing and eat away more of the material in order for the image to become deeper. this is normally applied to print making but i image the same can be done to other applications.

i think the level or engraving (actual depth of it) can tell more about how it was made.
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Jeffrey Hildebrandt
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PostPosted: Sun 21 Jul, 2013 6:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I etch armour and make intaglio prints, and it looks undoubtedly like acid etching to me.

-Hildebrandt

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Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
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PostPosted: Sun 21 Jul, 2013 10:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

from what i know of engraving - weather its print work or otherwise. i can say that an acid etching is probably an easier/ faster way to achiever the desired look or a hammered engraving when it comes to complex lines and close swirls. a really busy piece in other words. the acid will do most of the work, you just use your stylus to draw out the pattern, leaving only a light scratch.

hammered engraving - takes a ton of control. just to keep the chisel in a consistent depth takes a lot of learned skill in itself. not to mention the occasional distortion that close line work will cause. these days, many professional engravers use a numismatic engraving tool, which allows for some really detailed stuff.
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Scott Hanson




Location: La Crosse, WI
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PostPosted: Mon 22 Jul, 2013 6:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I just wanted to thank you for posting the photo. That's a beautiful piece.
Proverbs 27:17 "As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another"

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Waldemar Duszka




Location: Polska
Joined: 25 May 2012

Posts: 57

PostPosted: Mon 22 Jul, 2013 7:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Indeed, it is a nice photo ... and a beautiful gizarme.
I am in the process of forging.
See how it comes out ....... hahahahah
Yours.
Ibor.

Ibor
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Mon 22 Jul, 2013 9:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes, it's the earliest form of etching, in which the plate is covered with a resist and the design is scratched through the resist.

The later technique, typical of German pieces, involves painting the design with the resist, which leaves the main part of the design untouched by acid.

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Waldemar Duszka




Location: Polska
Joined: 25 May 2012

Posts: 57

PostPosted: Sun 28 Jul, 2013 10:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This gisarme have as prints so I tried to come out with a pen engraving.
After finishing like that.



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Ibor
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