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Christoph Allgaier




Location: Stuttgart, Germany
Joined: 23 Sep 2007

Posts: 7

PostPosted: Sat 25 May, 2013 11:43 am    Post subject: 1st post - Anglosaxon Broken Back Seax         Reply with quote

Hello myArmoury-Forum,
in my First post I would like to show you guys my recently completed broken back seax.
I traded the blade at the Moesgaard Viking Moot in Aarhus, DK in 2011 and it took me until a few weeks ago to start giving it a grip that the nice blade deserves.
It is made of cattle bone and antler as the end of the grip.
I suspect the blade is from the workshop of Paul Binns, but I'm not sure about that, because as I said it was a trade....

So the next step is to make a nice scabbard for the small seax.....I am hoping, it will not Take me another two years to ;-)

And currently I am working on another Project, which is an Alamannic broad seax.....I Hope I get it done before summer.

Please comment, critisize and make suggestions how I can improve....I am looking forward to your answers!
Greetings, Christoph



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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
Joined: 15 Mar 2004
Likes: 50 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Spotlight topics: 5
Posts: 8,178

PostPosted: Sun 26 May, 2013 7:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Really nice work on the handle and maybe you could add some comments on how you put it together, found the materials and any special treatment to stabilize the cow horn, if any was needed.

I also wonder if you made or found the brass fitting and adapted it from something else.

I recently used a very large 3" brass spherical 1/8" staircase decoration to cut up pieces of with a dremel cutting wheel for metal decorations to a walking staff I made. Also steel brass plated rings also used on the staircase wooden bars: The whole point is that one can find interesting and shaped pieces of brass or other metals and reshape them to use as handle/pommel/guard or other decorative elements with a little reshaping with dremel or grinders.

Making a collar/ferule from scratch from stock round or flat or castings takes some real machining equipment or casting capability or have these pieces custom cast from wax models and not economical to have just one piece cast.



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Brass Ball04.JPG
Examples of the brass decoration in it's original shape and after being partialy cut up for parts for projects.

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Ken Speed





Joined: 09 Oct 2006

Posts: 656

PostPosted: Sun 26 May, 2013 6:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yeah, What he said! Just kidding, although I do agree with my friend Jean; you did a super job on the handle, especially the bone.

I'm curious to see what the sheath you make will look like.
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Mark Moore




Location: East backwoods-assed Texas
Joined: 01 Oct 2003
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 2,256

PostPosted: Sun 26 May, 2013 7:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Fantastic. That grip is about as fine as it is functional! The blade really does look like a Paul B. Great work....can't wait to see the 'suit'.... Big Grin ............McM
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Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
Joined: 07 Aug 2011

Posts: 580

PostPosted: Tue 28 May, 2013 7:37 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

that grip is great, the rough unfinished joint of the horn has a great functional aspect, and the polished horn is almost like an ivory/glassy look.
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Alex Indman




Location: NYC
Joined: 13 Sep 2012

Posts: 96

PostPosted: Tue 28 May, 2013 8:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I also like the look of the polished bone.

Did you get a "processed" bone from some supplier, or started with a raw bone from a butcher's? I wonder how complicated it is to process/stabilize a bone for use as handle material.
And, BTW, what part of a cow this bone came from?

Alex.
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Christoph Allgaier




Location: Stuttgart, Germany
Joined: 23 Sep 2007

Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue 28 May, 2013 11:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for the positive resonance!
to your Questions:
The Cattle bone was unprocessed like the pic below (taken from the Internet) .
So it took me a lot of grinding an polishing to bring it into shape.
To bring the bone into shape I first used a rasp / file (Feile in german) to take away the large parts of material and continued with increasingly smoother sandpaper. For the polishing at the end I used a tool for the Drilling machine...Looks like I am not a real medieval craftsman ;-)

The brass Piece was some sort of cap of whatever I found in my box full of random brass and bronze pieces I purchased some years ago on eBay. So it had the right size and shape and I had nothing more to do than make a hole for the Tang and to polish it. Maybe it was a Fitting to some Kind of handle before...

I got the Bone from a Trader on some medieval reenactment market here in southwest Germany. As written above, it was unprocessed, meaning it had ist natural shape but it was cooked, free of meat residues and medulla (bone marrow? - dont know the right word...the stuff inside the bone)
I am not sure which part of the cow the bone is from, butt guessing Id say it might be from the lower front legs.



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Christoph Allgaier




Location: Stuttgart, Germany
Joined: 23 Sep 2007

Posts: 7

PostPosted: Wed 29 May, 2013 12:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

and one Thing Ive forgot to answer....I have a confession to make...
I used synthetical resin to fix the bone to the Tang...experiments with bone glue did not work out for me and regarding the smell, I decided to use modern material.
The antler part is fixed with two Pins or dowels and also the resin.
If you look a the Fotos you can see the resin where the brass Fitting and the bone do not connect properly.

Question to the more experienced Forum members: What would the historical accurateway have been?
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