Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Viking-esque type XIIa? Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Lafayette C Curtis




Location: Indonesia
Joined: 29 Nov 2006
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 2,689

PostPosted: Thu 04 Apr, 2013 8:29 pm    Post subject: Viking-esque type XIIa?         Reply with quote

I borrowed this sketch from a friend (with permission, of course) since I find the design intriguing even though it's not completely historical. The overall look is similar to some of the swords unearthed (and recorded) by Dr. Jorma Leppaaho but with a lengthened grip. So, what do you think?


 Attachment: 23.57 KB
xiia.jpg

View user's profile Send private message
Peter Anderson




Location: Holland, USA
Joined: 22 Mar 2013

Posts: 38

PostPosted: Fri 05 Apr, 2013 5:35 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It looks pretty nice. I suppose it would be a fairly neat sword for a later-century Scandinavian trying to keep in touch with his roots, perhaps copying or re-using the fittings from a family heirloom sword.

There are of course Type XIIs with Viking-style hilts: http://www.myArmoury.com/feature_spotxii.html
View user's profile Send private message
Mark Moore




Location: East backwoods-assed Texas
Joined: 01 Oct 2003
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 2,268

PostPosted: Fri 05 Apr, 2013 2:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I like that very much! As far as 'historically accurate' goes, that has been a subject of much heated debate on this and other sword forums in the past. So much so, in fact, that I find it almost laughable sometimes. This isn't the 8th or 9th century. It's 2013, and swords have evolved. (Sadly, some people have not.) This particular design shows me a fighting mans sword....built tough, strong, and with ergonomics in mind. The guard and pommel have the great 'in-out' effect that I like in a using sword. In other words, there is plenty of room for hand play on the grip. I've found that a great deal of 'Viking' swords on the market today suffer from very small grips, or pommels that aggitate the hand. This, to me, looks like a very comfortable sword to wield. If it were made into reality, I'd have a serious eye on it. Great design!.......McM
View user's profile Send private message
David McElrea




Location: Canada
Joined: 26 Nov 2003

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 438

PostPosted: Fri 05 Apr, 2013 3:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I seem to recall that there are grave slabs in Ireland that show longish swords with similar fittings-- primarily associated with Galloglas, I think.
View user's profile Send private message
Greg Ballantyne




Location: Maryland USA
Joined: 14 Feb 2011
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 235

PostPosted: Fri 05 Apr, 2013 7:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mark, don't judge the Viking sword grip to be small unless you know how to use it. I've been criticized for saying that the grip on a Viking sword should be sized to fit the hand of the wielder, even though my commentary was comparing 3 1/2" grip length to a 4 1/4" grip length. Since I am a fellow with large hands, I can say that a 4 1/4" grip length can be quite snug in a hammer grip, and can transition smoothly into a handshake grip (pommel in palm) in the right sized hand, or in my hand. These swords were strictly one handers, used with a shield in the other hand. Don't make the mistake of thinking that swords in the Viking era were used like swords in the middle ages. A longer grip with Viking style furniture may be a nice thing to think about or look at, but has no historical basis. Despite what some might say, historical basis is the only basis outside pure imagination. If you think about evolutionary forces, the evolutionary forces in sword design related to actual use came to an end long before 2013.The only evolutionary forces at work today are imagination. Nowhere in the world today do people depend on swords to defend their lives.
View user's profile Send private message
Eric W. Norenberg





Joined: 18 Jul 2008

Posts: 265

PostPosted: Fri 05 Apr, 2013 10:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Swords combining Viking style furniture with longer grips did indeed exist, but not during the actual viking period:
http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=12210

If I managed to link to the right page, look for the second post from the top, from Peter Johnsson. He's posted two examples of 16 C. Swedish swords that fit the description. He notes that they were ceremonial, and intended to evoke the "good ol' days" of Viking glory.
View user's profile Send private message
Elling Polden




Location: Bergen, Norway
Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Likes: 1 page

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,576

PostPosted: Tue 09 Apr, 2013 2:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks nice, definitely more "viking style" than historic, but aesteticaly apealing.


Greg Ballantyne wrote:
Since I am a fellow with large hands, I can say that a 4 1/4" grip length can be quite snug in a hammer grip, and can transition smoothly into a handshake grip (pommel in palm) in the right sized hand, or in my hand.


Quite true.I too use a dynamic grip when figthing with medvial or longer gripped viking swords.
But an Interestning observation I made when shortening the grip on a viking sword to the average 9,5cm (3.8 inches) ist this length, the hand naturaly clenches around the pommel, rather than pinch around the top as on a longer handled sword. As a consequence, you adopt quite differenct, more cut oriented way of using the sword.

With a longer handled sword this just feels clumsy as you have a large bit of empty handle between your hand and the guard. But the viking grip length seems to be adjusted for this.
And when the pomell is allready in your hand, the shape is no longer a problem.

"this [fight] looks curious, almost like a game. See, they are looking around them before they fall, to find a dry spot to fall on, or they are falling on their shields. Can you see blood on their cloths and weapons? No. This must be trickery."
-Reidar Sendeman, from King Sverre's Saga, 1201
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Viking-esque type XIIa?
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2019 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum