Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Help identifying this sword? Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Robert Lott





Joined: 05 Nov 2012

Posts: 3

PostPosted: Mon 05 Nov, 2012 4:19 pm    Post subject: Help identifying this sword?         Reply with quote

I can not find anything about this sword. If anyone can help please do! im trying to learn about its history ive had it for years and know nothing about it [/img]
View user's profile Send private message
Robert Lott





Joined: 05 Nov 2012

Posts: 3

PostPosted: Mon 05 Nov, 2012 4:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

http://i45.tinypic.com/2uh96d2.jpg
http://i46.tinypic.com/35ba7ph.jpg
http://i48.tinypic.com/2ymvpn9.jpg
http://i45.tinypic.com/sy6skl.jpg[
http://i50.tinypic.com/of1ytk.jpg
http://i45.tinypic.com/novl3c.jpg
http://i45.tinypic.com/2625i4o.jpg
http://i48.tinypic.com/14e2xpy.jpg
View user's profile Send private message
Scott Woodruff





Joined: 30 Nov 2005
Likes: 8 pages

Posts: 605

PostPosted: Mon 05 Nov, 2012 9:04 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It looks a lot like one of the Toledo wallhangers of which I have seen so many. They really are not bad swords, better than most of the swords that were manufactured during the "sword dark ages" that came between "the good old days" and the "sword rennaissance" when spathophiles were blessed with Tinker, AT, Albion and all the other fantastic makers who have blossomed in the last decade or so. IIRC, most of these good Toledo swords were manufactured from the 50's into the 70's. Somewhere on this site there is a thread about swords like yours, but as it is titled something like "what is this sword" it is probably impossible to find with the search funtion.
View user's profile Send private message
Tim M.





Joined: 21 Jan 2007

Posts: 48

PostPosted: Tue 06 Nov, 2012 7:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have to agree that the sword is most likely a Toledo. I have a sword that looks nearly identical from my early days of collecting swords. It was called an El Cid and has a stainless steel blade.
View user's profile Send private message
J. Hargis




Location: Pacific Palisades, California
Joined: 06 Feb 2012
Likes: 22 pages

Posts: 348

PostPosted: Tue 06 Nov, 2012 8:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If it wasn't for the sofa / chair pictured for scale, I'd think it was a letter opener.

But then letter openers probably stimulated my interest in collecting swords, so there we are.

Jon

A poorly maintained weapon is likely to belong to an unsafe and careless fighter.
View user's profile Send private message
Jack Savante





Joined: 01 Jun 2010
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 78

PostPosted: Wed 07 Nov, 2012 3:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi,

To answer your question that particular sword style is nominally Spanish. However Byzantines and Muslim Arabs used very similar hilts. Who influenced who is uncertain, because all three cultures started using the hilt style concurrently.

One famous example of a sword like yours is known as the sword of El Cid.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Espada_Tizona.jpg

Like the Charlemagne swords, its provenance is disputed.

It is quite famous, and it is likely the sword yours has been styled after.

It is a beautiful hilt style, one I'm not familiar with the proper use of, as Spanish swordsmanship is not yet part of my skill set.

The actual sword you have is probably from Toledo, or somewhere in Spain. Toledo is a famous source of iron ore and swords throughout Europe and the Islamic world also.

Often Toledo swords are of excellent quality. Treat it well, give is a clean with methylated spirits, and then wipe it with oil once every two months and welcome to the world of sword collecting!
View user's profile Send private message
Julian Reynolds




Location: United Kingdom
Joined: 30 Mar 2008

Posts: 271

PostPosted: Wed 07 Nov, 2012 9:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Or, on the other hand, it could be one of the many thousands of Spanish Toledo 'tourist junk' swords mass produced over the last 40-50 years, with a cast zinc-alloy plated hilt and a mild steel blade, that only vaguely resemble extant swords, and turn up regularly on this forum.

On the balance of probabilities, this is more likely. Either way, if it starts you on the path towards learning more about swords and building up a collection, then it has a value as such.

Julian
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Help identifying this sword?
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2019 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum