Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Darkening Hilt furniture (NOT bluing) Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Kai Lawson




Location: Madison, WI
Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Likes: 7 pages

Posts: 469

PostPosted: Sat 13 Oct, 2012 11:15 am    Post subject: Darkening Hilt furniture (NOT bluing)         Reply with quote

Hello all--

Does anyone have advice for darkening hilt furniture (mild steel, in my case) to a smoky or 'stained/tarnished' luster, while still keeping some sheen (i.e. not some oxide coating)? I have tried a bit of vinegar and salt, and yellow mustard, but the components look somewhat brownish, and using fire to 'smoke' the metal made it look dull. Any suggestions or products to help achieve this goal?

Thanks!
--Kai

"And they crossed swords."
--William Goldman, alias S. Morgenstern
View user's profile Send private message
Lloyd Winter




Location: Los Angeles
Joined: 27 Aug 2011

Posts: 167

PostPosted: Sat 13 Oct, 2012 11:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Kai, I've used cold blueing solutions or creams. They are not permanent and as they wear off, especially when assisted by fine steel wool and oil, thy leave behind a nice aged but polished patina. And if you don't like the look you can always polish it completely out.
Just cold blue your hilt components and then regularly but lightly polish with 000 steel wool with sewing machine oil in the wool. Eventually you should get a good patina that is darker than the steel but not really blued. It will continue to rust, let it build up a little bit of rust, and keep lightly using the steel wool and oil and you'll get something that almost looks like it's been browned but still has the sheen you are looking for. You can reapply the blueing solution as necessary.
It doesn't always work but if it fails there's no damage to your hilt and you are only out the cost of the blueing solution.
Good luck
View user's profile Send private message
Matthew P. Adams




Location: Cape Cod, MA
Joined: 08 Dec 2008
Likes: 8 pages

Posts: 456

PostPosted: Sat 13 Oct, 2012 5:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I darkened the furniture of my hanwei tinker longsword with linseed oil. It is dismountable though.

I made hooks for the cross and pommel from a wire hanger and wiped boiled linseed oil on. Then I baked at 500F for an hour. I did this maybe five times, to get an almost solid black. Three times gets a nice turtle shell effect.

If this process falls under blueing then I apologize, I just knew it made my cast iron black, and I figured it should work with mild steel. I don't know what you would call it.

"We do not rise to the level of our expectations. We fall to the level of our training" Archilochus, Greek Soldier, Poet, c. 650 BC
View user's profile Send private message
Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Likes: 10 pages
Reading list: 13 books

Spotlight topics: 7
Posts: 5,881

PostPosted: Sat 13 Oct, 2012 6:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

perma blue polished back to whatever shade of gray you want (with fine steel wool) is the best gray i've achieved. it's a beautiful finish. no waiting. you'll have your finish in a few minutes.
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
JE Sarge
Industry Professional



PostPosted: Sat 13 Oct, 2012 8:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Flynt wrote:
perma blue polished back to whatever shade of gray you want (with fine steel wool) is the best gray i've achieved. it's a beautiful finish. no waiting. you'll have your finish in a few minutes.


This...

I suggest using cold blue, then drawing the finish back as well. Your finish does not have to be 'blue' as in a firearm. The solution works well for many, many different shades and appearances. Here are some that I have done in various shades:









So, you can see that you can get a bit of variety in the coloring. Here is the product I like to use myself:

http://www.amazon.com/Birchwood-Casey-Perma-P...B000LC601K

To be honest, it's the easiest way and yields the most-consistant finish I can think of. I know it's technically 'blue', but it can give good results as far as greying/darkening go. At least it's something to consider.

J.E. Sarge
Crusader Monk Sword Scabbards and Customizations
www.crusadermonk.com

"But lack of documentation, especially for such early times, is not to be considered as evidence of non-existance." - Ewart Oakeshott
View user's profile Send private message
Christopher Treichel




Location: Metro D.C.
Joined: 14 Jan 2010

Posts: 268

PostPosted: Sat 13 Oct, 2012 8:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You can also russet or brown the steel using chemicals found in most places that supply muzzleloading supplies.
View user's profile Send private message
Walter Stockwell




Location: Campbell , CA
Joined: 05 Sep 2003
Reading list: 3 books

Posts: 41

PostPosted: Sun 14 Oct, 2012 9:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Don't expect to get the result you want in one coating. Whatever you use, put it on, polish it off. Repeat 5 times or so. Somewhere along the way you'll end up with the tone you want.
Walter
www.stockwellknives.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Christopher Treichel




Location: Metro D.C.
Joined: 14 Jan 2010

Posts: 268

PostPosted: Sun 14 Oct, 2012 10:23 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Don't think coating think changing the metal. If you want to give it an aged look... dissmount the hilt... wrap it tight in an old 100% cotton rag and douse with white cider vinegar. Leave it for a few days in a nice warm place. Should come out with a splotchy black crust that you will card off using steel wool. WEAR RUBBER GLOVES. rinse with lots of water. What you have done is create weak aqua fortis and this stuff will turn your hands black as well and do weird stuff to your finger nails. It is also used for blackening wood thourgh a heat treating process.

try getting a coupy of this book if your interested in this type of stuff. http://www.trackofthewolf.com/Categories/Part...1/BOOK-FBB
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Darkening Hilt furniture (NOT bluing)
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum