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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Sun 30 Sep, 2012 2:21 pm    Post subject: German Type XVa c. 1400         Reply with quote

This on-going project was already introduced here http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=23870&start=20.

Initially, I didn't intend to show the whole step-by-step process of its making, because I didn't want to take up any more of your time with this; but lately I changed my mind. For doing this, I was encouraged by Mr. Sean Flynt and his own "Early 16th c. Longsword Project". Thanks, Sean!

The project is German Type XVa hand-and-a-half sword, although the blade has a fuller, which is not typical for its type.

As a source I use this one
http://www.zornhau.de/wordpress/wp-content/ga...-gross.jpg

and its data-sheet
http://www.zornhau.de/wordpress/wp-content/up...tZEF07.pdf

found at the page of the Zornhau - Thanks a lot, guys! You really do an amazing work!

Because of my initial intend, I didn't take any photos of the blade-making. But the steps are the same as the other project - so you can see them here http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?p=256874#256874

This


is the final result. The next step is the heat-treatment.

"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Sun 30 Sep, 2012 2:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I really like the aesthetics of this kind of blade with a short fuller and looking forward to seeing the rest of the project in progress pics and comments: These types of Topics are always interesting and educational and fun. Big Grin
You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Boris Bedrosov
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Location: Bourgas, Bulgaria
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PostPosted: Wed 31 Oct, 2012 4:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Till waiting for the heat-treated blades (and beside two Finnish puukko, one broken-back seax and one khanjar for the "Yushman Project", which I make in parallel currently), I decide to work over the guards and the pommels of both swords.

I had much doubts about the pommel here, and particularly - about the hole, running through its whole length, which is 110 mm.



But today I managed to drill it quite easy, working on both sides. In the middle (which was my greatest concern) the two holes cross-passed each other with difference less than one mm. This was re-worked with a reamer.


"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Wed 14 Nov, 2012 12:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

As the pommel of the longsword, this blank also was turned on a lathe. And although I have some knowledge and experience with lathes, this time I saw things, which I've never believed could be done on this type of machine.



Raicho in action (Raicho is extremely skillful lathe-operator with more than 40 years of experience)



Close to the end - the pommel is taking shape



And this



is the result at the end.

"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Wed 14 Nov, 2012 12:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

And a set of better pictures, taken at home








"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Wed 24 Jul, 2013 2:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Although I received this blade from the heat-treatment a couple of months ago, I got the opportunity to work on it just these days.

The blade just after the heat-treatment



and after today



Though it wasn't great progress, I managed to make the passes over the belt-grinder - grits 60, 120 and 180. From here I want to work in the old-fashion way - with stones by hand, as in times past long ago.

"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Lewis Ballard




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PostPosted: Thu 25 Jul, 2013 9:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This is one I'll be following. I really enjoy your work, both on the yushman project and this.
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Daniel Wallace




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PostPosted: Fri 26 Jul, 2013 8:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

i always like seeing the 'in process' photos. helps me out if i see something i can apply to my own DIY projects on the bench.
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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Thu 01 Aug, 2013 1:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Meanwhile in January, I tried something I've never tried before - to forge the guard of this sword.

The slit for the tang was cut with chisel while hot-red (sorry, I don't have picture of this step), which was followed by an (failed Surprised Sad) attempt to forge the shoulders of the guard to diamond cross-section







And the lack of experience resulted this



As mentioned - a fail.
The slit is too long for my tang; nor the diamond cross-section is visible. Maybe I should deal with this for just a bit longer time, then I might get a "better" result. But in any case, I really like what I've done, mainly because I learned something new.
For now, this piece of steel (I even don't call it guard) is just thrown away in the corner, waiting eventually to be used for suitable sword.

"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Mon 05 Aug, 2013 4:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This weekend I dealt with the guard and pommel. As the pommel is still in rough stage, I'll show only the guard now.

The steel block was marked after the slot for the tang had been cut



The first cut



was followed by three more and both shoulders took shape



Now, I had to form the diamond cross-section.
The first shoulder is about to be ready - it needs just one more cut



And this is the final result


"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Kai Lawson




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PostPosted: Mon 05 Aug, 2013 9:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This is going to be a really good looking longsword. That furniture and blade will make a beautiful, elegant, functional-looking weapon.

I love watching your threads Mr. Bedrosov

"And they crossed swords."
--William Goldman, alias S. Morgenstern
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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Tue 13 Aug, 2013 1:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Grinding the pommel, I was so absorbed in my work, that I made only a couple of pictures of this stage.

Almost at the end



And finally ready



Here, my greatest concern was how to properly clamp the pommel due to its strange diamond form. Now, the sides of the diamond are all straight.

Later, I re-worked them, using the wheel of the bench-grinder as a pattern. As a result, after that the sides have hollow-ground shape.






"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Tue 13 Aug, 2013 1:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

So, I already have a guard and a pommel. What I need is a grip.

It was turned on lathe from beech.



Then the round form was cut alongside in two equal pieces, and both were made thinner - up to the dimensions mentioned in the data-sheet.



At the end both halves were rounded.



Note, that I made them less with a couple of millimeters - in order to compensate the thickness of the wrap and the leather.

So, now I have the whole hilt - although not ready yet I really like it.



And wrapped in adhesive tape as a whole for some testing.



Good appearance, elegant lines, comfortable for use with one hand, although the pommel is too heavy (quite normal - I don't have a blade yet). The work with both hands was - I don't know how to say - personally for me not the best quality of this hilt.
But in any way, the handling characteristics will reveal themselves after the whole sword is assembled.

"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Tue 27 Aug, 2013 3:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Recently, the blade got its sanding. As you know, I prefer to make this by hand with stones and sanding paper, using a belt-grinder only in the beginning.

Here I stone the blade - judging by the dimensions of the stone this should be grit #150



One side is already passed with the appropriate stone - this time I'm absolutely sure that the picture was taken after the pass with grit #180 stone



And finally - the whole blade after the grit #600 (this grit was done with sanding paper and wooden block)



Note that the fullers are left to be sanded last.

"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Mark Griffin




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PostPosted: Wed 28 Aug, 2013 2:26 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Enjoying watching the process, the final result is bound to be worth all your efforts. Keep up the good work!

Griff
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Matthew P. Adams




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PostPosted: Wed 28 Aug, 2013 12:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The grip making method of lathe, cut in half, and thin to make it ovoid never occurred to me, what a great idea.
"We do not rise to the level of our expectations. We fall to the level of our training" Archilochus, Greek Soldier, Poet, c. 650 BC
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Wed 28 Aug, 2013 12:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's looking wonderful! Very inspiring work on the cross and pommel, especially!
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Sun 01 Sep, 2013 1:04 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, today I finished the blade.

After the sanding, which was made up to grit #1200 with sanding paper (the fullers were completed just up to #600 - I personally prefer them a little bit more "satin" than the proper blade)



And several hours later after the polishing



Close to the fuller



and a menacing view to the tip


"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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Josh S





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PostPosted: Sun 01 Sep, 2013 2:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Generally, the Type XVa's don't appeal to me at all. I find them to be over-represented in the market and often generic in design. I like this one, though. Its proportions are quite attractive. The pommel type really does go well with the shorter cross, and the blade itself is sleek without being too linear. Very nice piece, looking forward to it when finished.
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Boris Bedrosov
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PostPosted: Tue 03 Sep, 2013 2:09 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

There are four edges in the pommel of the original sword, that have always upset - to this day.
The result after some grinding with the Dremel tool and some additional filing:



So far the result is not what I want it to be, but at least a good progress was made.
The edges of the original are more clearly pronounced, but there is still work to be done before this pommel is finished. For now, I just wonder if it would be good to mark additionally these edges with a chisel.

"Everyone who has the right to wear a long sword, has to remember that his sword is his soul,
and he has to separate from it when he separates from his life"
Tokugawa Ieyasu

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