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David Wilson




Location: In a van down by the river
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 785

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2012 1:53 pm    Post subject: Bronze-age Stuff         Reply with quote

Here are some of mine....
Swords, left to right: Kris Cutlery, Del Tin 215a, Neil Burridge Naue II (late), Manning Imperial Canaanite khopesh, Neil Burridge Egyptian Khopesh, Neil Burridge type G, Del Tin 210a.



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David K. Wilson, Jr.
Laird of Glencoe

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David Wilson




Location: In a van down by the river
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 785

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2012 1:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Now, two axes: Manning Imperial Canaanite "duckbill", Windlass "Assyrian"


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David K. Wilson, Jr.
Laird of Glencoe

Now available on Amazon: Franklin Posner's "Suburban Vampire: A Tale of the Human Condition -- With Vampires" https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072N7Y591
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David Wilson




Location: In a van down by the river
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 785

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2012 2:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some comments: The Kris Cutlery sword (long discontinued) is actually made of brass. Not bronze. At 2.5 lbs it's relatively heavy, but quite manageable. Of course, it's historical accuracy is minimal, at best -- not only the material, but also the length of the hilt and the fullering are questionable.
The Del Tin swords are crowbars. They both weigh over 3.5 lbs. I had Art Elwell install the stag grips on the 215a. It was my first bronze sword; what did I know at the time? The 210a is heavier, but better balanced. Still a crowbar.
The Manning Khopesh is overweight at 2.75 lbs. I think it handles well despite the weight. It's definitely a chopper.
The Neil Burridge swords are, of course, awesome. Comparing the Burridge Naue II and the DT 215a is like night and day. All my other bronze swords bow down to the awesomeness that is the Burridge bronze.

The Manning Imperial "duckbill" is mounted on a pretty obviously modern hammer haft. It's a temporary arrangement until I can come up with something better.

David K. Wilson, Jr.
Laird of Glencoe

Now available on Amazon: Franklin Posner's "Suburban Vampire: A Tale of the Human Condition -- With Vampires" https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072N7Y591
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Timo Nieminen




Location: Brisbane, Australia
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PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2012 2:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

David Wilson wrote:
The Manning Imperial "duckbill" is mounted on a pretty obviously modern hammer haft. It's a temporary arrangement until I can come up with something better.


Do we have art showing how duckbills were mounted?

What I would take to be the obvious method is to use cord/rawhide thongs to strap it on, through the holes (and above/below the head?). This would work better if the haft sticks out into the holes. It looks like it would, if it was wider, but you have some wooden plugs/wedges to make the narrower haft fit. I was wondering if that was deliberate to make the haft less visible in the holes.

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Dan Howard




Location: Maitland, NSW, Australia
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PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2012 2:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's a beautiful collection David. Thanks for sharing. IMO all sword collectors should have at least one Burridge sword. It gives some perspective and helps to dispel myths about swords.
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Gregory J. Liebau




Location: Dinuba, CA
Joined: 27 Nov 2004

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PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2012 3:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

An excellent array of weaponry, David. After selling my three incomplete Burridge blades some time ago, I am seriously regretting the move... It's been hard to come up with finances to purchase more to actually finish!

Are you a member over at the Bronze Age Center? I can't recall... Re-posting your collection there would be a very fine thing, indeed, as many members would appreciate being able to see these photos and even more details regarding your hilt constructions, etc.

Cheers!

-Gregory
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David Wilson




Location: In a van down by the river
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 785

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2012 5:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Timo Nieminen wrote:
David Wilson wrote:
The Manning Imperial "duckbill" is mounted on a pretty obviously modern hammer haft. It's a temporary arrangement until I can come up with something better.


Do we have art showing how duckbills were mounted?

What I would take to be the obvious method is to use cord/rawhide thongs to strap it on, through the holes (and above/below the head?). This would work better if the haft sticks out into the holes. It looks like it would, if it was wider, but you have some wooden plugs/wedges to make the narrower haft fit. I was wondering if that was deliberate to make the haft less visible in the holes.


I'm not sure, anyway I haven't seen any... I was considering the leather cord/wrap technique similar to what you're describing at some point, though....

David K. Wilson, Jr.
Laird of Glencoe

Now available on Amazon: Franklin Posner's "Suburban Vampire: A Tale of the Human Condition -- With Vampires" https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072N7Y591
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David Wilson




Location: In a van down by the river
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 785

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2012 5:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Gregory J. Liebau wrote:
An excellent array of weaponry, David. After selling my three incomplete Burridge blades some time ago, I am seriously regretting the move... It's been hard to come up with finances to purchase more to actually finish!

Are you a member over at the Bronze Age Center? I can't recall... Re-posting your collection there would be a very fine thing, indeed, as many members would appreciate being able to see these photos and even more details regarding your hilt constructions, etc.

Cheers!

-Gregory


I actually am a member over at BAC... was going to post there too but ran out of time....

(My hilt construction technique is simple -- I usually let more talented folks do it for me.....) Big Grin

David K. Wilson, Jr.
Laird of Glencoe

Now available on Amazon: Franklin Posner's "Suburban Vampire: A Tale of the Human Condition -- With Vampires" https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072N7Y591
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Matthew Amt




Location: Laurel, MD, USA
Joined: 17 Sep 2003

Posts: 1,364

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2012 8:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Timo Nieminen wrote:
Do we have art showing how duckbills were mounted?

What I would take to be the obvious method is to use cord/rawhide thongs to strap it on, through the holes (and above/below the head?). This would work better if the haft sticks out into the holes. It looks like it would, if it was wider, but you have some wooden plugs/wedges to make the narrower haft fit. I was wondering if that was deliberate to make the haft less visible in the holes.


There are plenty of depictions of duckbill axes in use. No thongs are used, more likely just a wedge at the top like a modern axe. The shaft is fully exposed in the holes, in fact on a few surviving examples the wood is gone but there is a decorated gold sleeve still in place. The haft is typically angled or curved forward a little, and can flair at the butt. I *love* duckbills and am jealous of yours!

WINDLASS made that axe??? I'm shocked! I'm guessing it's a bit of a boat anchor, but still, it casts the right shadow, as far as I can tell. (Though I confess that's not a style I've studied!)

Nice collection, thanks for sharing the photos!

Matthew
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David Wilson




Location: In a van down by the river
Joined: 23 Aug 2003

Posts: 785

PostPosted: Tue 25 Sep, 2012 11:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Matthew Amt wrote:

There are plenty of depictions of duckbill axes in use. No thongs are used, more likely just a wedge at the top like a modern axe. The shaft is fully exposed in the holes, in fact on a few surviving examples the wood is gone but there is a decorated gold sleeve still in place. The haft is typically angled or curved forward a little, and can flair at the butt. I *love* duckbills and am jealous of yours!

WINDLASS made that axe??? I'm shocked! I'm guessing it's a bit of a boat anchor, but still, it casts the right shadow, as far as I can tell. (Though I confess that's not a style I've studied!)

Nice collection, thanks for sharing the photos!

Matthew


Thanks!
Actually, the axe head itself isn't bad at all! The haft is weird, though. It's rather wide, and just feels odd in the hand.

David K. Wilson, Jr.
Laird of Glencoe

Now available on Amazon: Franklin Posner's "Suburban Vampire: A Tale of the Human Condition -- With Vampires" https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072N7Y591
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Paul Hansen




Location: The Netherlands
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PostPosted: Tue 02 Oct, 2012 11:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice collection David!

It reminds me that I need a khopesh. Or to finish one of my many unfinished bronze swords... Confused
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Robert Muse




Location: Washington
Joined: 28 Sep 2009
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Posts: 481

PostPosted: Tue 02 Oct, 2012 2:48 pm    Post subject: Bronze Age         Reply with quote

Very nice collection. Somewhat before my era for collecting, but I agree that everyone should have a sword by Neil, who is a real gentleman to deal with.

Here is mine.

Robert



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David Wilson




Location: In a van down by the river
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Posts: 785

PostPosted: Tue 02 Oct, 2012 5:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice scabbard! Who made it?
David K. Wilson, Jr.
Laird of Glencoe

Now available on Amazon: Franklin Posner's "Suburban Vampire: A Tale of the Human Condition -- With Vampires" https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072N7Y591
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Robert Muse




Location: Washington
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PostPosted: Tue 02 Oct, 2012 6:36 pm    Post subject: Scabbaard         Reply with quote

Hi,
Sonny Suttles made it. He has made some great scabbards for me. Of late he has been impossible to contact and must be very behind. I have some work in limbo with him. I hope he is very busy and isn't ill.

Robert
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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
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PostPosted: Tue 02 Oct, 2012 6:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Matthew Amt wrote:
Timo Nieminen wrote:
Do we have art showing how duckbills were mounted?

What I would take to be the obvious method is to use cord/rawhide thongs to strap it on, through the holes (and above/below the head?). This would work better if the haft sticks out into the holes. It looks like it would, if it was wider, but you have some wooden plugs/wedges to make the narrower haft fit. I was wondering if that was deliberate to make the haft less visible in the holes.


There are plenty of depictions of duckbill axes in use. No thongs are used, more likely just a wedge at the top like a modern axe. The shaft is fully exposed in the holes, in fact on a few surviving examples the wood is gone but there is a decorated gold sleeve still in place. The haft is typically angled or curved forward a little, and can flair at the butt. I *love* duckbills and am jealous of yours!

WINDLASS made that axe??? I'm shocked! I'm guessing it's a bit of a boat anchor, but still, it casts the right shadow, as far as I can tell. (Though I confess that's not a style I've studied!)

Nice collection, thanks for sharing the photos!

Matthew


I have a reference book with that type of axe identified as from Luristan in origin but I guess Assyrian is regionally close by or overlaps with the Assyrian Empire at some time period ?

In any case it looks very very close to the pics in my reference books.

Oh, and nice collection David. Big Grin Cool

I have another version of Bronze sword by Del-tin ( Leaf shaped blade ) purchased from Albion around 2001 and it is overweight also, the tip/central rib was sort of crude and stubby but I used files to at least re-profile it to better geometry and sort of sharpen the edges. I assume that the edges of the Del Tins are not hammer work hardened and too soft to take a good edge: So I didn't try to do much more than create a decent secondary bevel.

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Dan Howard




Location: Maitland, NSW, Australia
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PostPosted: Wed 03 Oct, 2012 1:08 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
I have a reference book with that type of axe identified as from Luristan in origin but I guess Assyrian is regionally close by or overlaps with the Assyrian Empire at some time period ?.

These days "Luristan" has become shorthand for "illegally looted from somewhere in the Middle East".


Last edited by Dan Howard on Wed 03 Oct, 2012 1:10 am; edited 1 time in total
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Mackenzie Cosens




Location: Vancouver Canada
Joined: 08 Aug 2007

Posts: 238

PostPosted: Wed 03 Oct, 2012 1:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

lovely.

http://www.bronze-age-swords.com/index.htm

The menu at the side will roll out when you mouse over it.
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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
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PostPosted: Wed 03 Oct, 2012 8:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dan Howard wrote:
Jean Thibodeau wrote:
I have a reference book with that type of axe identified as from Luristan in origin but I guess Assyrian is regionally close by or overlaps with the Assyrian Empire at some time period ?.

These days "Luristan" has become shorthand for "illegally looted from somewhere in the Middle East".



Interesting and " unfortunate ": Don't know if it qualifies as " these days " since it's in a book I bought around 1969 published in France.

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Dan Howard




Location: Maitland, NSW, Australia
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PostPosted: Thu 04 Oct, 2012 6:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Back then it might actually have been found in Luristan.
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