Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Scabbard/Grip Making Tip Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Likes: 10 pages
Reading list: 13 books

Spotlight topics: 7
Posts: 5,900

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2012 7:49 am    Post subject: Scabbard/Grip Making Tip         Reply with quote

Those of you have made scabbards and grips using historical methods know how tedious it can be to properly hollow the halves.
I recently got one of these, thinking it could help:
http://www.amazon.com/Dremel-335-01-Plunge-Ro...mel+router
Most of you working on these kinds of projects have a Dremel. Do yourself a favor and get one of these and the appropriate bit. It radically reduces manufacture time on those projects.

You still have to set it up carefully, making sure you have the depth set properly, and you have to apply pressure appropriate to match the blade's distal taper, but you don't have to fuss over chisels. Just leave enough material that you can easily fine-tune the fit with sandpaper.

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Thomas R.




Location: Germany
Joined: 10 May 2010
Likes: 4 pages
Reading list: 17 books

Posts: 395

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2012 9:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

HI Sean,

that's a good advice! I have such a plunge router thingy and it works very good for small pieces, like a grip. For bigger projects, like a scabbard, I find it too messy. The bit then gets hot really fast, especially if you try to do the whole depth in one go. After a third of one scabbard halve, I got back to using my chisel.

For safety use goggles and a breathing mask (and earplugs, if you like). It's really messy and loud, working with this thing.

Regards,
Thomas

http://maerenundlobebaeren.tumblr.com/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Tom King




Location: florida
Joined: 11 Sep 2009
Likes: 2 pages

Posts: 428

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2012 9:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've actually been thinking of buying one of the dremel dry wall cutting mounts for this purpose, but this is obviously much better. Cutting out crossbows and grips without access to a CNC machine can be a pain, and routers are expensive. This is a nice middle ground in price and functionality.
View user's profile Send private message
Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Likes: 10 pages
Reading list: 13 books

Spotlight topics: 7
Posts: 5,900

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2012 10:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

mine doesn't overheat, but I'm not using the full power of the Dremel (same result, better control).
i'll second the advice about the dust. do NOT use this without a good dust mask and eye protection. Good idea to shed your shirt and run your hair under the sink before removing mask, too. That dust can mess you up in a big way. if you have a Shopvac, you can tape the nozzle to your work table to cut down on the mess.

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Christopher Treichel




Location: Metro D.C.
Joined: 14 Jan 2010

Posts: 268

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2012 10:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have both a dremel and the router attachment... but honestly I prefer using my paring chilsels and offset paring chisels.
View user's profile Send private message
John Giles




Location: Northwest Florida
Joined: 19 Aug 2011
Likes: 3 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 26

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2012 11:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Great advice! I'm just starting to tinker with making my own grips, so this info is very timely!! Thanks!
True Courage is about knowing not when to take a life, but when to spare one.
View user's profile Send private message
T.F. McCraken




Location: Ingleside, Illinois
Joined: 13 Apr 2006

Posts: 128

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2012 12:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have it down to an art. I can mark, core, glue and shape a wood core in about 2 hours. I've tried the plunge router avenue, but, I think if I made a jig it would work better. As it stands now, it's all done with a Dremel and a drum sanding bit. Then a palm sander to smooth.

Thanks for the tip Sean!

Murphy Cool

aka "Murphy"
See ya at Bristol Renaissance Faire!

The decisions we make, dictate the life we lead.

"I drank what?" -Socrates
www.celticfuryproduction.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Likes: 10 pages
Reading list: 13 books

Spotlight topics: 7
Posts: 5,900

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2012 1:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm finding that this, a Stanley Surform tool and coarse/fine paper is really all I need. I'll occasionally use a chisel for rough shaping, but it's not strictly necessary. If I had fine chisels and could maintain them properly, I'd probably prefer those (assuming I could use them well, too). But it would still be hard to beat this little router for speed, and my time in the shop is extremely limited.
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Christopher Treichel




Location: Metro D.C.
Joined: 14 Jan 2010

Posts: 268

PostPosted: Thu 20 Sep, 2012 1:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is probably the difference... I collect antique tools and use them. That includes very nice paring chisels which I keep honed with rouge. Comparing these to the ones you could buy these days at home depot is like comparing apples and oranges. A sharp chisel is well and capable of cutting through rock hard maple sideways. My dremel on the other hand starts to chatter and you have to make many passes. I also use inletting black and think a good fit should be really tight such that the peen on the end of the pommel is not the only thing holding the weight of the blade. So its all nice and snug.
View user's profile Send private message
Matthew Bunker




Location: Somerset UK
Joined: 02 Apr 2009

Posts: 483

PostPosted: Fri 21 Sep, 2012 12:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I just use a proper, grown-up Bosch plunge router (which is the scariest hand held power tool known to man) for mass clearance and then finish with a shallow scorp and a cabinet scraper.
"If a Greek can do it, two Englishman certainly can !"
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Scabbard/Grip Making Tip
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum