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Dave Roper
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PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 9:43 am    Post subject: Staffordshire Hoard Seax and Sword         Reply with quote

Have just finished making Staffordshire Hoard seax, sword and exploded sword hilt for Tamworth Castle Museum.
Blades were supplied by client.




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Matt Corbin




PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 10:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dave, fantastic work!!! I saw these on your FB page and couldn't stop drooling over them. Thanks for posting them here as well.

Question on the "exploded view" hilt: is that a weight under the pommel cap? Something to balance out the blade a bit? I haven't seen that before and was wondering if there are historical examples.

P.S. I just realized this was your first post. Welcome to myArmoury

“This was the age of heroes, some legendary, some historical . . . the misty borderland of history where fact and legend mingle.”
- R. Ewart Oakeshott
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Blaz Berlec




Location: Podgorje, Kamnik, Slovenia, Europe
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PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 10:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm stunned! Happy

Extant 15th Century German Gothic Armour
Extant 15th century Milanese armour
Arming doublet of the 15th century
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Dave Roper
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PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 1:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The "weight" under the pommel cap is actually the pommel. The caps are hollow. The end of the tang has to be fixed and clenched solidly to something, and the delicacy of the gold upper plate placed on an organic substance would probably not be sufficient to hold everything solid.

Under the Sutton Hoo pommel cap there was corroded copper alloy material and the same at the top of the sword blade, which leads me to believe there may have been a "core" for attaching the pommel to, so I have based my exploded sword on this supposition.

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Tim Lison




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PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 2:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think my eyes just popped out of my skull and then got lost in my drool! WOW! These are really, really good! I'm glad they're heading to a museum because that's where they belong!!!!
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Wilhelm S.





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PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 2:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Gorgeous work as always Mr. Roper.
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Stephen Curtin




PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 5:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Stunning work Mr. Roper, and welcome to the forum, hope you stick around and share your future work and thoughts with us.
Éirinn go Brách
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Jean-Carle Hudon




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PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 7:49 pm    Post subject: Tamworth Castle         Reply with quote

Sure makes a man want to vist Tamworth Castle Museum !
Bon coeur et bon bras
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David Huggins




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PostPosted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 8:36 pm    Post subject: Staffs         Reply with quote

Hiya Dave,

The most breathtaking of work and may I add here a welcome to the myArmoury Forum, long overdue.

For those interested much of Dave's other works of wonder can also be seen on his own website and Facebook
page and that of Wulfheodenas, hint, see photos tagged 'courtesy of D.Roper'.

best
Dave.

and he who stands and sheds blood with us, shall be as a brother.
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Matthew Bunker




Location: Somerset UK
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Sep, 2012 1:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I ran out of superlatives for Dave's work a while ago. I'm just glad I think his levels of skill make me want to improve my own, rather than just give up.

Lovely stuff as ever Mr R. An inspiration to us all.

"If a Greek can do it, two Englishman certainly can !"
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Dave Roper
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Sep, 2012 4:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks all for your kind words and your warm welcome!
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Paul Mortimer




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PostPosted: Tue 11 Sep, 2012 4:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Great work Dave. Now for the Sutton Hoo hilt and those tantalizing extra little jewels!

Paul
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Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
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PostPosted: Tue 11 Sep, 2012 8:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

holy crap Eek!

i'm curious how the stone work was done. when i saw the documentary on national geographic they had a diagram that showed that the stones were set with a gold perforated backing to refract more light.

its so amazing to see work thats got such a high level of detail. the handel of the seax, is that an ivory?
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Paul Hansen




Location: The Netherlands
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PostPosted: Sat 15 Sep, 2012 1:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Welcome to the forums!

And I must agree with the others, that's fantastic work! Eek!

I can only imagine how difficult the cloisonné of the sax furniture must have been...

Could you tell us why you have selected these woods for the swords?
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Kai Lawson




Location: Madison, WI
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PostPosted: Sun 16 Sep, 2012 5:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Absolutely unbelievable. Really great cloisonné.
"And they crossed swords."
--William Goldman, alias S. Morgenstern
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Dave Roper
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PostPosted: Sun 23 Sep, 2012 5:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for all your kind comments.
The woods used in the grips are Elm and Yew. Chosen for their decorative look and the fact that they are local to the area.

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Mark Routledge
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PostPosted: Sun 23 Sep, 2012 6:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Really good to see you here Dave.

You really do set a standard of your own in my opinion. The execution is flawless as always.

Happy

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Bruce Tordoff
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PostPosted: Sun 23 Sep, 2012 7:53 am    Post subject: Staffs Seax         Reply with quote

Hi Dave, Welcome to the forum,

Firstly, Just when I was quietly basking in the afterglow of the response of myArmoury to my version of the Staffs seax, you go and post this! I may have to go and slash my wrists, with my inferior but sharp enough attempt!

But seriously,you've Knocked it out of the park, Again! Gorgeous as always.

I'm so glad you've done an 'exploded' view of the sword.
One thing I found from personal experience, is that the Public, who are not usually 'au fait' with sword making techniques of the period, have NO idea how these things fit together, and as with the hoard, can be just a bunch of random bits of twisted metal, with holes in. This method of 'deconstructed' reconstruction, gives you it in a nut shell. Which I feel is perfect for a museum.

and finally, talking about sword hilts is mine done yet! (Hint, Hint!)

Cheers Dave,

Bruce
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