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Matt J.





Joined: 26 May 2010

Posts: 47

PostPosted: Sat 18 Aug, 2012 12:18 am    Post subject: Details of Warrior Training         Reply with quote

Anyone know details of how ancient warriors conditioned themselves? I've heard of stuff like running with logs, general athleticism, sparring, and practising their swings, generally speaking. Is that an accurate gist of it, or would I be missing out on other important parts which made up the training?
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R. Kolick





Joined: 04 Feb 2012

Posts: 114

PostPosted: Sat 18 Aug, 2012 2:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

depends on the culture what you have is the basic training that all seem to have in common but each culture has other things aside from those that seems to very from culture to culture
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Lafayette C Curtis




Location: Indonesia
Joined: 29 Nov 2006
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PostPosted: Mon 20 Aug, 2012 10:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes, which ancient warriors? That being said, the cultures for which we have the most information are the Greeks and the Romans, and the standard source for the latter is Vegetius:

http://www.pvv.ntnu.no/~madsb/home/war/vegetius/

Like most would-be reformers, his standards were probably a bit high and didn't always match what was demanded in practice, but at least it gives a good idea of what a Late Roman military thinker would have wanted contemporary soldiers to be capable of.
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Quinn W.




Location: Bellingham, WA
Joined: 02 May 2009

Posts: 197

PostPosted: Wed 22 Aug, 2012 4:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I wrote an undergraduate paper on the topic of training for knights in fourteenth-century Europe. Not exactly what you're looking for, but many in the high middle ages still referenced older texts like Vegetius and are probably similar in a number of ways.
You can find a copy via a link posted on this thread:
http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t...mp;start=0

"Some say that the age of chivalry is past, that the spirit of romance is dead. The age of chivalry is never past, so long as there is a wrong left unredressed on earth"
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Thomas R.




Location: Germany
Joined: 10 May 2010
Likes: 4 pages
Reading list: 17 books

Posts: 395

PostPosted: Wed 22 Aug, 2012 11:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quinn W. wrote:
I wrote an undergraduate paper on the topic of training for knights in fourteenth-century Europe. Not exactly what you're looking for, but many in the high middle ages still referenced older texts like Vegetius and are probably similar in a number of ways.
You can find a copy via a link posted on this thread:
http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t...mp;start=0


Hi Quinn,
the link in your previous thread is dead. Can you upload your paper again?

Thomas

http://maerenundlobebaeren.tumblr.com/
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Mart Shearer




Location: Jackson, MS, USA
Joined: 18 Aug 2012

Posts: 1,280

PostPosted: Thu 23 Aug, 2012 8:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

From the mid-13th century Norwegian King's Mirror:
Quote:
Now if your comrades are planning to go from the king's apartments to some drinking bout or other merrymaking, and you, too, have the king's permission to seek diversion, you should prefer the forms of amusement which I shall now point out to you. If you are sojourning where horses may be ridden and you have your own horse, put on heavy armor and, mounting your horse, train yourself in the art of sitting on horseback in the firmest and most handsome manner. Train yourself to press the foot firmly into the stirrup; keep your leg stiff and the heel a little lower than the toes, except when you have to guard against thrusts from the front; and practice sitting firmly with the thighs pressed close. Cover your breast and limbs carefully with a curved shield. Train your left hand to grasp firmly the bridle and the grip of the shield, and your right hand to direct the spear-thrust so that all your bodily strength will support it. Train your good steed to veer about when in full gallop; keep him clean and in good condition; keep him shod firmly and well, and provide him with a strong and handsome harness.

But if you are in a borough or some such place where horses cannot be used for recreation, you should take up this form of amusement: go to your chambers and put on heavy armor; next look up some fellow henchman (he may be a native or an alien) who likes to drill with you and whom you know to be well trained to fight behind a shield or a buckler. Always bring heavy armor to this exercise, either chain-mail or a thick gambison, and carry a heavy sword and a weighty shield or buckler in your hand. In this game you should strive to learn suitable thrusts and such counterstrokes as are good, necessary, and convenient. Learn precisely how to cover yourself with the shield, so that you may be able to guard well when you have to deal with a foeman. If you feel that it is important to be well trained in these activities, go through the exercise twice a day, if it is convenient; but let no day pass, except holidays, without practicing this drill at least once; for it is counted proper for all kingsmen to master this art and, moreover, it must be mastered if it is to be of service. If the drill tires you and makes you thirsty, drink a little now and then, enough to quench your thirst; but while the game is on, be careful not to drink till you are drunk or even merry.

If you should like to try a variety of drills and pastimes, there are certain sports that one can take up out of doors, if that is thought more diverting. For one thing, you may have a pole prepared, somewhat heavier than a spear shaft, and put up a mark some distance away for a target; with these you can determine how far and how accurately you can throw a spear and do it effectively. It is also counted rare sport and pastime to take one's bow and go with other men to practice archery. Another pleasant and useful diversion is to practice throwing with a sling both for distance and for accuracy, and with a staff sling as well as with a hand sling, and to practice throwing stone missiles. Formerly the custom was for all who wished to become expert in such arts and thoroughly proficient in war and chivalry to train both hands alike to the use of weapons. Strive after the same skill, if you find yourself gifted for it, inasmuch as those who are trained in that way are the most perfect in these activities and the most dangerous to their enemies.

ferrum ferro acuitur et homo exacuit faciem amici sui
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