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Bob Haynes




Location: Mount Perry, Ohio
Joined: 06 Apr 2008
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Posts: 56

PostPosted: Mon 18 Jun, 2012 9:58 pm    Post subject: Looking for a sturdy Viking Age axe         Reply with quote

If I go through with this, it might not be for a good while, like a few months to a year or so. But still I'd at least like to ask here just in case.

But does anyone know where I can perhaps get my hands on an axe that is rugged enough to be able to fell a tree, and chop it up into firewood. What I would like is one that could do that, but also happens to have some look and feel of a fighting axe.

Would this be in the realm of possibility?
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Eric W. Norenberg





Joined: 18 Jul 2008

Posts: 265

PostPosted: Mon 18 Jun, 2012 11:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If I had the cash, I'd already own a Gransfors Bruks:
http://www.gransfors.com/htm_eng/index.html

(I can't make a link go straight to the "old axes" category so you'll have to use the menu bar at the left side of their home page. Go to "Products" first, then "replicas of old axes". Sorry!)

Their "replicas of old axes" lineup includes a couple of Viking inspired models that you might like. Note that the more dedicated to felling an axe's design is, the less like a fighting axe it will usually be. Another way to say that is, the models that look more like fighting axes are more general purpose in design, probably great for camp duties and non-specialized carpentry, but won't be great for lumberjacking!

Cheers!
Eric
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Wilhelm S.





Joined: 09 Jun 2011

Posts: 47

PostPosted: Tue 19 Jun, 2012 6:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

http://www.jeffhelmes.com/axes.html I have yet to buy from him but I know people who are quite pleased with his work. He is also a resident here on the forums.
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Bob Haynes




Location: Mount Perry, Ohio
Joined: 06 Apr 2008
Likes: 16 pages

Posts: 56

PostPosted: Tue 19 Jun, 2012 9:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes I understand that when looking for one functionality that another would need to be sacrificed. Though this mean that both aspects would likely be reduced, that's why I'm looking for something of both realms.

I'm liking Gränsfors' axes, as well as Mr Helmes', I just might go for the latter though. Think I might even pick up a seax from him down the road.
That $4000+ sword that I saw gives me the impression that he knows what he's doing.

I know this is off topic, but wow the price on some of these quality swords, really do seem to add a lot of realism to them. They really help in gauging how it expensive a sword would be back then. Of course they didn't have the currency we do, I'm just saying that it helps paint the picture a bit more vividly, in showing us an equivalent in ours.


Last edited by Bob Haynes on Tue 19 Jun, 2012 12:38 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Matt Corbin




Location: U.S.A.
Joined: 16 Jan 2004
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PostPosted: Tue 19 Jun, 2012 9:25 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Forum member Owen Bush also makes some VERY nice viking era axes:

http://owenbush.co.uk/axes/

“This was the age of heroes, some legendary, some historical . . . the misty borderland of history where fact and legend mingle.”
- R. Ewart Oakeshott
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Robin Smith




Location: Louisiana
Joined: 23 Dec 2006
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Reading list: 17 books

Posts: 746

PostPosted: Tue 19 Jun, 2012 10:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bob Haynes wrote:
Yes I understand that when looking for one functionality that another would need to be sacrificed. Though this mean that both aspects would likely be reduced, that's why I'm looking for something of both realms.

I'm liking Gränsfors' axes, as well as Mr Helmes', I just might go for the latter though. Think I might even pick up a seax from him down the road.
That $4000+ sword that I saw gives me the impression that he knows what he's doing.

I know this is off topic, but wow the price on some of these quality swords, really do seem to add a lot of realism to them. They really help in gauging how it expensive a sword would be back then. Of course they didn't have the currency they do, I'm just saying that it helps paint the picture a bit more vividly, in showing us an equivalent in ours.

Jeff is great to work with. He definitely knows what he is doing.

That sword in particular the blade is shear steel and iron and the hilt has copper inlay. It is a very nice piece, and if I didn't already have a custom project in the works with Mr Helmes, I would be sorely tempted by it.

A furore Normannorum libera nos, Domine
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Bob Haynes




Location: Mount Perry, Ohio
Joined: 06 Apr 2008
Likes: 16 pages

Posts: 56

PostPosted: Tue 19 Jun, 2012 1:09 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Whoa, some really nice options I'm having laid out, thanks to you guys. I'm seeing some pretty impressive work by Owen. Very impressive sax selection too.

Jeff however, yes I know that when looking for something quality, you get what you paid for. And this means research as much as monetarily. But sometimes you can tell through sheer text, and Jeff indeed does sound like he's good and laid back, but in a professional manner. Many smiths I've seen have this quality, but he seems profoundly more than most.
So yes, though I admit that I haven't traded words with him yet, so I get what you're saying, Mr. Smith.


Now, I forgot to clarify a bit about the intended use. I don't intend to hack down a forest with this thing, but I do intend to fell at least one tree with it in the process of making myself a pell out of it. Sure I can take a shillelagh or wooden sword to a tree, but I'd like to have a wooden poll as a target, as I would kinda feel funny whacking at a tree.

The Helmsdash axe looks really like what I'd like to have, I'm looking for a bearded style head, but would also like a more defined top horn. Think of a hybrid between a bearded axe and a Dane. As would chop at the tree- at a high angle to make a man-sized pell- I'll also thrust at it, maybe a little haft stroke here and there, nothing too rough like I will with the axe trainer I'll have for the actual pell.
Again I understand with the wood chopping capability that it would lose fighting balance, however I kind of like that, it would be as though its weighted more for training.

I'll still use it as needed, but that is the intended primary function besides being one heck of a nice collector's item. In my opinion anyways. It would be my first quality piece towards my Viking Age collection. I already have a Paul Chen bearded axe, but I seriously doubt that this fine scrapper would be proper for it, and won't want to risk it.
I do know that it does a good job against wooden coffee tables. ^ ^'

This being by my father, and he's the really responsible sort. The story there, is that we replaced it with one of fine quality that was inherited to us, and it was about that time that I decided to collect the axe. Well, he loves it so much as well, that he just had to test it out, that it he couldn't help but "feel destructive". To this day, if he asks me to look at it, it wouldn't be long before he would shove it back to me, so to speak, telling me of how it makes him want to hack on something else.
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Scott Woodruff





Joined: 30 Nov 2005
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Posts: 601

PostPosted: Mon 27 Aug, 2012 11:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here is a link to one of mine. http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=26748 I just traded a couple of bearded axes at the Gimli viking event, prior to that I used my axes daily at work as a tree-trimmer. They are great for cutting roots and branches in tight spots where you don't want to use your chainsaw. Most of my axes are compromise designs, equally good for combat and work. I also make and fight with blunt steel axes. They are very fast and maneuverable, and make a great back-up weapon to my spear.
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