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Emil Andersson




Location: Sweden
Joined: 17 Oct 2010

Posts: 136

PostPosted: Sun 11 Dec, 2011 2:42 pm    Post subject: Metal formal wear?         Reply with quote

Hello.

Earlier this evening (european time Wink) I was looking through some threads on an imageboard and stumbled upon the two pictures that I have attached to this post. I don't know anything at all about them or if what they're depicting even exists outside of these images, but I am intrigued by them and thought I'd share my curiosity with you all.

Are these two items real? If they are, what might be the history behind them? I assume that they'd be nothing but decorative, kind of like having several suits of armour around your mansion.



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P. Cha




PostPosted: Sun 11 Dec, 2011 3:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

How do you even fit in one of those...much less MOVE?!?
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Colt Reeves





Joined: 09 Mar 2009

Posts: 466

PostPosted: Sun 11 Dec, 2011 4:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The more important questions is how soon until we see Lady Gaga in one of them?





On a more serious note: I don't see any joints. Are they there but cleverly hidden? That would be an interesting thing to see worn in court, just for the novelty.

"Tears are for the craven, prayers are for the clown.
Halters for the silly neck that cannot keep a crown.
As my loss is grievous, so my hope is small.
For Iron, Cold Iron, must be master of men all..."
-Cold Iron, Rudyard Kipling
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Sun 11 Dec, 2011 6:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

sorry...those are from an exhibition at Graz Landeszeughaus many years ago. Search "Graz" here and you'll find more. these are not metal. they're modern creations inspired by armour. Sad
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
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PostPosted: Sun 11 Dec, 2011 10:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Flynt wrote:
sorry...those are from an exhibition at Graz Landeszeughaus many years ago. Search "Graz" here and you'll find more. these are not metal. they're modern creations inspired by armour. Sad


Quote:
these are not metal


Then even more likely to seen be worn by lady GaGa if she ever found out about them, she wouldn't be able to resist I imagine. Wink Razz Laughing Out Loud

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Emil Andersson




Location: Sweden
Joined: 17 Oct 2010

Posts: 136

PostPosted: Sun 11 Dec, 2011 10:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Flynt wrote:
sorry...those are from an exhibition at Graz Landeszeughaus many years ago. Search "Graz" here and you'll find more. these are not metal. they're modern creations inspired by armour.


I couldn't find anything about them with a quick search (only 5 results with mentions of 'Graz' but not of these dresses) but I'm not surprised to hear that they're modern productions. I would be equally unsurprised to hear that they actually were period creations though, since there's certainly been some oddities coming out of the historical days already!

What material are they made out of? The second picture in particular certainly made me think it was steel. For a second I almost thought that it was an arming point visible on the shoulder. Laughing Out Loud
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Marik C.S.




Location: Germany
Joined: 16 Feb 2010

Posts: 163

PostPosted: Mon 12 Dec, 2011 12:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This reminds me less of armour and more of those street artists pretending to be living statues.
I guess it's some kind of acrylic fabric covered in chrome paint.

Europe - Where the History comes from. - Eddie Izzard
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Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
Joined: 07 Aug 2011

Posts: 580

PostPosted: Mon 12 Dec, 2011 3:35 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

i've seen these posted here in the past and never really payed that much attention to them. at first look they do look like steel but they don't seem to have any patina on them. the second one, i almost wonder if it was done by some kind of casting, the torso details are really spot on it looks very 'skin tight'

could something like this be made from iron/steel. i see it as possible, but it might take a lifetime to make it.

armour wasn't worn by just the guys but there's only two females that come to mind when you i think women in armour, i'd wonder what the armour of Joan of Arc would be like? probably no different from a man's armour. another historical person that these bring to my mind is eleanor or aquitaine who also was said to have taken up the sword and armour in her own defence.
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Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
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PostPosted: Mon 12 Dec, 2011 7:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Marik C.S. wrote:
This reminds me less of armour and more of those street artists pretending to be living statues.
I guess it's some kind of acrylic fabric covered in chrome paint.

My thoughts exactly! Especially on the first photo, the color and, uh, type of shininess are just wrong for steel - it looks more like pewter or chrome-imitation plastic hubcaps. Still kinda nifty, though. Happy

The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings


Last edited by Mikko Kuusirati on Mon 12 Dec, 2011 8:09 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
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PostPosted: Mon 12 Dec, 2011 8:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Daniel Wallace wrote:
could something like this be made from iron/steel. i see it as possible, but it might take a lifetime to make it.

Perfectly possible, and it wouldn't take anywhere close to a lifetime, either - more like several months or years depending on your resources and facilities. Even more intricate metal sculpture is done all the time, believe it or not. The thing is, you couldn't wear it because it has no articulation of any kind: it would just be a dress-shaped metal shell with no function besides looking cool on display.

PS. Although, come to think of it, some of the fancier historical "puffed-and-slashed" harnesses I've seen do come pretty close to this while being fully functional and wearable, too...

The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
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William P




Location: Sydney, Australia
Joined: 11 Jul 2010

Posts: 1,436

PostPosted: Mon 12 Dec, 2011 8:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Daniel Wallace wrote:
i've seen these posted here in the past and never really payed that much attention to them. at first look they do look like steel but they don't seem to have any patina on them. the second one, i almost wonder if it was done by some kind of casting, the torso details are really spot on it looks very 'skin tight'

could something like this be made from iron/steel. i see it as possible, but it might take a lifetime to make it.

armour wasn't worn by just the guys but there's only two females that come to mind when you i think women in armour, i'd wonder what the armour of Joan of Arc would be like? probably no different from a man's armour. another historical person that these bring to my mind is eleanor or aquitaine who also was said to have taken up the sword and armour in her own defence.

well considering joan was french,especially considering the french often utilized italian armourers shed likely have a globose breastplate which was common fare around that time,
, which, with the assistance of a band of cloth to heep her breasts in line, plus having them squeezed under the akaton, i think largely the shape of the breastplate would help keep her breasts from interfering too much
though curiously , if wikipedia is in any way accurate, it suggests that alot of her stuff was DONATED, particularly her armour.which i think would mean she would likely have not fit the armour all that well.

the OTHER woman warrior that I can think of is arguably, joans eastern counterpart, in terms of time period, but this girl was no godly virgin
the womans name was tomoe gozen, a female samurai, arguably the third most famous female warrior (after joan of arc and boudicca)
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Christian G. Cameron




Location: Toronto, Canada
Joined: 07 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Tue 13 Dec, 2011 10:29 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quite a few women wore armour and fought. There were, according to the latest scholarly biography of John Hawkwood, so many women serving as men-at--arms in the English companies he led that Italian city-states passed ordinances about letting them enter town dressed as men--an interesting comment on the time, and the sometimes forgotten role of women in war.

Sir William Gold's mistress served in armour at one of the sieges in the late 1360s. I can speak from experience--a woman of womanly proportions has little difficulty fitting into my late 14th c' harness. In fact, as someone else on this thread suggested, I wonder if the globose style made it easier for women to serve in harness.

Also, Joanna of Naples and some of her ladies wore harness (I could find citations for all of these if pressed).

Christian G. Cameron

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Daniel Wallace




Location: Pennsylvania USA
Joined: 07 Aug 2011

Posts: 580

PostPosted: Tue 13 Dec, 2011 1:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

i can't quote my source because it's from a book that i read quite a while back and might have been from my local libaray. but it seemed to hint at the idea that noble women who accompanied their husbands on the second crusade did in fact fight along side of them. now i think this is another story that's also surrounding eleanor of aquitaine, but i didn't look much further into the idea at the time being that my focus is on the first crusade and other aspects but would be interesting to track down some evidence.

i dunno, if you ask me - through history there's probably been a ton of female worriers that we don't even know about that fought right alone side men that weren't considered 'amazons' (strange but what does that word even imply?) from my own experience my last g/f was quite the lady, but god what a lioness. she asked me to get her a pink pistol for her b-day but i wouldn't do it because i was a little afraid for the guy that would get plugged by a pink pistol and might have to live with the shame of that for the rest of his life Laughing Out Loud
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Ryan McLaurin




Location: California
Joined: 12 May 2008

Posts: 31

PostPosted: Tue 13 Dec, 2011 2:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Upon first glance I'm reminded of the old practice of "bronzing" boots. However, I don't believe that's possible to do with a dress...... Pretty neat looking though. Would be incredible if they were in fact steel.
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