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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Fri 28 Oct, 2011 3:01 pm    Post subject: A Type XVIa Build - WIP         Reply with quote

I haven't done a build thread in awhile and this is one that I am currently working on. I should have started this a few weeks ago , but I haven't had much time to post stuff as we are swamped this fall.

I was asked to make a type XVIa for Tim Seaton. I jumped a the opportunity and talked him into letting me do wrought iron fittings out of the same bar of wrought iron that I did RAGNAR's(his custom viking from me(http://imakeswords.com/ragnar.htm)) hilt from. We brainstormed together a little and decided to keep it subtle and sweet and let the wrought do most of the detail work.

On with the build...

This is the drawing that I first worked up for him for approval. he said it was right on but wanted the fuller a tad longer.


I will get back to the blade later. Lets get on to the fun part.
So I wanted to make the fittings from the same bar of wrought that I made his viking parts from but that bar was just too small to make a decent sized wheel pommel from so i decided to get to forge welding. Here you can see the three bars stacked up ready to be forge welded. Some people cut everything perfectly to shape but I like to leave the bottom bar longer and use it as a handle instead of fumbling with tongs.


Nobody was around to take photos of me forging it but i will try to tell you the best I can what I did. I simply tac weld the corners with a mig to keep them lined up then fired up the welding temp forge which is a Don Fogg style upright. Once I was up to temp I stock the bar in. Once it started to show a tad of color I pulled it out and fluxed just a little bit. I find that if you flux wrought and plan on etching it later that you will see more of a line at the weld and I wanted to try and hide the weld lines as much as possible. I should add that I sanded the surfaces that were to be welded to remove any rust or dirt. When I say i used a tiny bit of flux I mean that I pinched with my finger and thumb in the flux jar and barely sprinkled on the joints. Thats it. Just so the edges we solid. I knew the middle would weld fine without flux but I needed the corners/edges as flush as possible to save thickness. Then back in the forge. Once to temp I pulled it out and went right to the anvil with a hand hammer. Hit it a few times then back to heat. Pulled it out a 2nd time and took it under our flat dyes on the fly press just to get it nice and solid. It was prob welded fine with the hand hammering but why not use told when you have them.

Here are the pieces after the weld and pressing.


Here are you can see it after I used 50 grit and sanded the surface to check my welds. Looks solid.




I then cut the 3 pieces from the rest of the bar and worked it to shape. I did most of it on a sander. Normally we would do this on a lather like we did with the Tristan(http://imakeswords.com/images/tristanfinnal2c.JPG) pommel but I didn't want a perfectly round wheel. I was going for the squat version that I have seen often on XVIa's.

Here it is roughly to shape.



Time for grinding on the face. For this I use a 2" wheel on our Bader sanders and just work it around until you get the desired shape. I also use a magnet for extra support. Thank you John Mitchell for showing me that trick. Saves you from quenching 1000 times during the process.


Here are a few pics I took during the grinding.





This is where I stopped with the roughing.


Matthew Stagmer
Maker of custom and production weaponry
www.BaltimoreKnife.com


Last edited by Matthew Stagmer on Fri 28 Oct, 2011 3:44 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Fri 28 Oct, 2011 3:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Now, unto the guard. For this I used what used to be the handle for the pommel welds. All I did was use a power hammer to draw out the bar close to shape.Then, to make sure It was even, I stuck a piece of stock under the fly press that was my desired thickness and used it as a stop. Then i just squished the bar until it was all the same size and nice and square.



Then I cut the bar at my desired lengths and forged my bow tie ends with a hand hammer.



...and repeat on the other side.


Matthew Stagmer
Maker of custom and production weaponry
www.BaltimoreKnife.com
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Sat 29 Oct, 2011 7:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here are the pieces layed out with the blade that is now heat treated and just rough ground.




Here is the guard cleaned off at 60 grit.


Close up of the pommel before polishing.


Here are the parts at 120 grit.


Here is the pommel polished out. Note that the lines you see are not the weld lines. That is the natural pattern of this wrought.


Here is the pommel with just a light etch. More color will come out when I do the final etch. Etched with 4-1 Ferric-distilled water. For this pre-etch I just wiped it on with a paper towel. The final etch I will dunk it.


Matthew Stagmer
Maker of custom and production weaponry
www.BaltimoreKnife.com
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2011 9:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here is the guard slotted to fit the wide tang.


Here is the guard polished out to a satin finish waiting for etch.





And here she is with a light etch.






This wrought has amazing figure and color in it. I can't wait to get this sword together and do a final etch to show it's true glory.

Matthew Stagmer
Maker of custom and production weaponry
www.BaltimoreKnife.com
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Bartek Strojek




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PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2011 10:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I love some XVIa's ,really nice type.

I'm looking forward to see more, thanks for great thread!
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Tim Seaton




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PostPosted: Mon 31 Oct, 2011 10:22 pm    Post subject: wrought         Reply with quote

Cool Matt thats Amazing how the Acid Etch brings out the grain in the Wrought Iron . Almost looks like redwood grain we have alot of old growth redwood trees here in northern calif. thanks for sharing the progress of the sword Cool
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Leo Todeschini
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2011 1:33 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Great stuff Matthew.

It is going to a be a lovely piece, with a lovely look with all that wrought.

In addition to watching a nice piece grow from some bits of material, it is really good to see how others tackle the same challeges and problems but from different angles so thanks for sharing.

Tod

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Owen Bush
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2011 1:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

looks great ,
(I have bader space saver envy!!)

forging soul into steel .

www.owenbush.co.uk the home of bushfire forge school of smithing .
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2011 9:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bartek Strojek wrote:
I love some XVIa's ,really nice type.

I'm looking forward to see more, thanks for great thread!


Thanks Bartek, I have wanted to do a true type XVIa for some time now.

Matthew Stagmer
Maker of custom and production weaponry
www.BaltimoreKnife.com
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2011 9:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Leo Todeschini wrote:
Great stuff Matthew.

It is going to a be a lovely piece, with a lovely look with all that wrought.

In addition to watching a nice piece grow from some bits of material, it is really good to see how others tackle the same challeges and problems but from different angles so thanks for sharing.

Tod


I agree Tod. I enjoy watching other makers tackle similar problems with different methods. I know that Kerry wanted me to take the bar and upset it until it was large enough around for a wheel but I felt confidant that I could forge weld the pieces and make it work and be left with more material. Neither way is right or wrong, just different.

Thanks for the love.

Matthew Stagmer
Maker of custom and production weaponry
www.BaltimoreKnife.com
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2011 9:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Owen Bush wrote:
looks great ,
(I have bader space saver envy!!)


Owen you are welcome to use them if you are ever on this side of the pond...

On this note...something was bothering me about this wheel pommel. Yes, it is beautiful as is but I felt it was a wee bit chucky so I decided to go back to the sander and create some taper from bottem to top to add some much needed form. I was thinking to myself "you are crazy" while I was doing it but now I am glad that I added some more shape.



Now, I just have to true the faces a bit more and I am done with the pommel.

Matthew Stagmer
Maker of custom and production weaponry
www.BaltimoreKnife.com
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Bartek Strojek




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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2011 10:32 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Pommel had indeed looked quite large in previous photo, compared to the rest.

Did this last grinding change the weight of the pommel by any significant margin, or was it purely 'cosmetic' action?
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2011 1:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bartek Strojek wrote:
Pommel had indeed looked quite large in previous photo, compared to the rest.

Did this last grinding change the weight of the pommel by any significant margin, or was it purely 'cosmetic' action?


I didn't weigh it before or after, but it did take off quite a bit. I am distally tapering the blade, so I don't feel that I needed that much weight. I will admit that the initial reasoning for changing the shape was purely cosmetic.

Matthew Stagmer
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Sean O Stevens




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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2011 8:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I too love the 'grain' the the etching brings out in your iron... beautiful.... would love to have a sword with fittings made from that.
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Tue 09 Oct, 2012 11:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Another bump from the past. This project was finished earlier this year.


Here is the blade ground and polished.


Here is the handle blank fitted to the tang. Desert Ironwood.


Here is the handle roughed


Here the handle starts to take shape.




Here you can see the carving in the works.


Here you can see the pieces together before the final etch. Also the lower ring not shown here.


Here is a mock up. I ended up slimming the hilt just a bit.


A side view.

Matthew Stagmer
Maker of custom and production weaponry
www.BaltimoreKnife.com
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Tue 09 Oct, 2012 11:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote


Right before the last etch with Sam Salvati looking on. Happy

Matthew Stagmer
Maker of custom and production weaponry
www.BaltimoreKnife.com
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Wed 10 Oct, 2012 11:43 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here is the finished sword.











For more pictures of the finished sword please visit our website: http://www.imakeswords.com/kelticlongsword.htm

Thanks for looking. This was a fun piece to make and I look forward to similar projects.

Matthew Stagmer
Maker of custom and production weaponry
www.BaltimoreKnife.com
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Bartek Strojek




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PostPosted: Wed 10 Oct, 2012 12:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Stunning piece.

Grip looks a bit smallish for XVa, or is it just me?
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Matthew Stagmer
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PostPosted: Wed 10 Oct, 2012 1:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

No it is a bit smaller then I had planned. The blade ended up far to light for a longer handle. The most distal I have done on a sword. Just didnt expect it to end up that light.
Matthew Stagmer
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www.BaltimoreKnife.com
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Tim Seaton




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PostPosted: Wed 10 Oct, 2012 2:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The handle Amazingly fits your hand. and give you room for your left hand to control the pummel
The handling of this sword quite Amazing in its self. matt real created a one of a kind
Type XVI. Gentalmen at BKS have out done there selfS lately.
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