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Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > Privateer Armoury: Cutlass set Reply to topic
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Ben Potter
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Location: Altadena, CA
Joined: 29 Sep 2008

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PostPosted: Thu 06 Oct, 2011 2:55 pm    Post subject: Privateer Armoury: Cutlass set         Reply with quote

These swords are based on # 361.s p182 Swords and Blades of the American Revolution.


The specs for the sharp sword:
weight: 1lb 12oz.
Length: 29 1/2"
Blade: 25" x 1/8"
PoB: 6"
Cop: 17"
SN: at guard

Ben Potter Bladesmith

It's not that I would trade my lot
For any other man's,
Nor that I will be ashamed
Of my work torn hands-

For I have chosen the path I tread
Knowing it would be steep,
And I will take the joys thereof
And the consequences reap.
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W. Knight




Location: United States
Joined: 30 Jul 2011
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 86

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PostPosted: Fri 07 Oct, 2011 7:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mr. Potter,
I've never really gotten interested in this time period, but I really like two things about these swords. What material are the cream colored grips made of? And how did you achieve that antiqued look on the blades? Both look very nice, IMO.
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Ben Potter
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Location: Altadena, CA
Joined: 29 Sep 2008

Posts: 342

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Fri 07 Oct, 2011 9:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

W. Knight wrote:
Mr. Potter,
I've never really gotten interested in this time period, but I really like two things about these swords. What material are the cream colored grips made of? And how did you achieve that antiqued look on the blades? Both look very nice, IMO.


Thanks.
The grips are bone. Antiquing is basically just careful use of oxidizing and polishing cycles. I use a variety of things for the antiquing. For oxidizers I use mustard(prepared), gun blueing, saltwater, ferric chloride, etc. For polishing I use, sandpaper (400gt-1000gt), steel wool, metal polish, a wire wheel, buffing wheels. If one wants the blade to really look right you have to add the nicks and scratches that would have happened to the blade (look at historical examples in museums to see where and what type of damage battle swords had).
Hope that helps.

Ben Potter Bladesmith

It's not that I would trade my lot
For any other man's,
Nor that I will be ashamed
Of my work torn hands-

For I have chosen the path I tread
Knowing it would be steep,
And I will take the joys thereof
And the consequences reap.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
W. Knight




Location: United States
Joined: 30 Jul 2011
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 86

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Fri 07 Oct, 2011 12:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mr. Potter,

Yes, I really like that. I have some older Windlass swords that show a lot of wear (not realistic battle damage, but at least a lot of test cutting damage and so forth) and I feel like they just have more character than brand new perfectly polished ones.

(I feel the need for a disclaimer here, as someone on the forum may decide to bring up the fact that swords were repaired from time to time as needed by swordsmiths and would not have been allowed to retain lots of nicks and such for long. I am aware of this, just saying how much character I think is added to the look of a sword as it gets extensively used)

Ok, sorry, back to the subject at hand -- From the photos, that antiquing does look like years of wear and natural aging. All those things going on in the blade keeps the overall simple design of the swords from being too simple, IMO. I think it was a wonderful choice, and sort of "makes the sword" from an aesthetic viewpoint.

Just one more question: How does such antiquing as this stand up to actual use? If an antiqued sword is cut through hard objects like small branches or even moderate ones like large water jugs, how would the antiquing be affected? I'm guessing a finish like this might actually weather use very well, as the method you described seems like a series of chemical processes, rather than just surface finish. Not sure though... ?

[I was wondering about this also when looking at the new pattern welded Sutton Hoo sword blade in another thread (the one with no fuller where the blade is acid etched to show the pattern all over). It seems like without the acid etched part of the sword kind of protected like it is on most swords, (with it recessed in the fuller, and thus not coming into contact with objects being cut) the pattern would begin to be worn with scratches over time which would not be easily fixed as they would on a highly polished sword]
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Ben Potter
Industry Professional



Location: Altadena, CA
Joined: 29 Sep 2008

Posts: 342

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Fri 07 Oct, 2011 5:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The antiqued finish (done this way) will act exactly like a sword that actually was older. It is not a fake finish but just uses more aggressive chemicals (and sometimes heat) to speed the aging process.

Genuine pattern welded blades that are etched are only slightly harder to "re-polish" then their mirror finished brothers (or perhaps sons is more historically likely). It does take a fair bit more care and artistry to get it blended in but it is completely doable.

Ben Potter Bladesmith

It's not that I would trade my lot
For any other man's,
Nor that I will be ashamed
Of my work torn hands-

For I have chosen the path I tread
Knowing it would be steep,
And I will take the joys thereof
And the consequences reap.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
W. Knight




Location: United States
Joined: 30 Jul 2011
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 86

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Sat 08 Oct, 2011 9:52 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mr. Potter,
Thanks for the explantation. I really like the aged patina used on those swords now that I know how durable it would be if I got a sword done like that! Happy
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