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Sander Marechal




Location: The Netherlands
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Aug, 2011 2:55 am    Post subject: Problem de-rusting maille         Reply with quote

I've run into a little snag when de-rusting a hauberk. I put the hauberk in a closed bucket with some sharp sand and shook it for a couple of hours. The rust came right off, but now the rings of the hauberk are all dull and grey. They used to be shiny. I brushed off all the sand and iron dust. But how can I restore at least some of it's former shine? Do it again with finer sand? Add oil to the sand? Or is there some better way?

Thanks in advance!



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The Knights Hospitaller: http://www.hospitaalridders.nl
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Augusto Boer Bront
Industry Professional



Location: Cividale del Friuli (UD) Italy
Joined: 12 Nov 2009

Posts: 259

PostPosted: Sat 27 Aug, 2011 4:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Maybe that's the colour that historical mail is supposed to be Big Grin .
I used to have tha same problem. I tore away the rusted galvanization with an entire pack of 24 "steel woods" (I don't know the exact english name, it's this http://www.antichitabelsito.it/immagini/lana-acciaio.jpg).
I suppose that if you want to "re-shine" you mail, you'll need a grinder and use the technique thet use the armourers to mirror-polish the armours, or re-galvanize your hauberk.

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Aleksei Sosnovski





Joined: 04 Mar 2008

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PostPosted: Sat 27 Aug, 2011 4:33 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just wear it :-D Surfaces that rub against each other will eventually become shiny. Oh, and don't forget to oil your maille!
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Tod Glenn




Location: Helena MT
Joined: 05 Sep 2008
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Aug, 2011 12:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I clean maille using corn cob polishing media and a large vibratory. You can get plain or garnet infused media from placed that supply reloading equipment. It's used to polish brass cases, but also works on steel. Use the garnet stuff for maille, otherwise it takes days to get a shine on the links.

You can also use dry cream of wheat with a mild abrasive like valve polishing compound. It takes a long time to get a polish, and takes a vibratory large enough to hold the maille. You have to be really dedicated to do it by hand.
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Will C




Location: Brisbane, Australia
Joined: 22 Nov 2008

Posts: 22

PostPosted: Sat 27 Aug, 2011 8:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Put it in a bucket with sawdust throw it in the boot of your car for a couple weeks ( Length of time varies with how often you drive the car) or somewhere where its going to get a lot of vibration, This is also a good way of removing rust.
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Colt Reeves





Joined: 09 Mar 2009

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PostPosted: Sun 28 Aug, 2011 2:08 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Now that there is a good idea. I don't own any armour, let alone maille, but I will keep that in mind if I ever get some.

I bet if you made sure the bucket is waterproof and used it as a counter weight on a tractor or other farm vehicle that might get it done faster. (Assuming said vehicle gets regular use. I'd try to find some local farmers during harvest season.)

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Halters for the silly neck that cannot keep a crown.
As my loss is grievous, so my hope is small.
For Iron, Cold Iron, must be master of men all..."
-Cold Iron, Rudyard Kipling
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Sander Marechal




Location: The Netherlands
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PostPosted: Mon 29 Aug, 2011 1:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks all. A generous helping of oil brought the sheen right back. I think the dull grey was mostly dust that refused to be brushed away.
The Knights Hospitaller: http://www.hospitaalridders.nl
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Thomas R.




Location: Germany
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PostPosted: Mon 29 Aug, 2011 2:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I had liked the sawdust-idea best, Sander! Big Grin Good to hear, your problem is solved, nevertheless! Wink
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Brett Whinnen




Location: Brisbane, Australia
Joined: 06 Jan 2010
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PostPosted: Mon 29 Aug, 2011 4:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It would have been interesting to see before as well as the after photos Happy

What oil did you end up using Sander? A normal style oil or one of those fancy penetrating oils / lubricant / water dispersals? Always curious to see what everyone else is using.

Thankfully I've not had to go down this track yet Happy
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Sander Marechal




Location: The Netherlands
Joined: 04 Dec 2009
Reading list: 17 books

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Posts: 671

PostPosted: Tue 30 Aug, 2011 9:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Brett Whinnen wrote:
It would have been interesting to see before as well as the after photos Happy


Well, those pics I posted are after polishing with sand, but before oiling.

Quote:
What oil did you end up using Sander? A normal style oil or one of those fancy penetrating oils / lubricant / water dispersals? Always curious to see what everyone else is using.


I use something called "Poetsolie" in Dutch. It's a generic cleaning oil, used to clean and protect bike frames among other things (just to be clear, it's not the lubricant oil you put on bike chains and gears!). I buy it at the bicycle store. Nice thing about that is that I can get it way cheaper and in larger volumes than the sewing machine oil I used before.

Thomas R. wrote:
I had liked the sawdust-idea best, Sander!


Maybe next time Happy

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Brett Whinnen




Location: Brisbane, Australia
Joined: 06 Jan 2010
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Posts: 14

PostPosted: Tue 30 Aug, 2011 1:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I assume that would be something like the Kroon Oil ""Polishing Oil"? Looks like an interesting product, we don't really have anything similar here, not that I've been to a bike shop recently Happy

And yes I meant prior to polishing with sand so still in the rust stage.

Thanks Happy
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