Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Dating of reproduction breastplate Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Tjarand Matre




Location: Nøtterøy, Norway
Joined: 19 Sep 2010

Posts: 158

PostPosted: Wed 11 May, 2011 10:35 pm    Post subject: Dating of reproduction breastplate         Reply with quote

I've been offered a breastplate like this for a very fair price. Any opinions on what era this would be appropriate for? My kit is mostly late 14th early 15th and I suspect this plate is later.

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Stephen Curtin




Location: Cork, Ireland
Joined: 17 Nov 2007
Likes: 110 pages
Reading list: 18 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,155

PostPosted: Wed 11 May, 2011 11:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Tjarand, I'm far from an expert but to me this looks to be a 17th century breastplate
Éirinn go Brách
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Tjarand Matre




Location: Nøtterøy, Norway
Joined: 19 Sep 2010

Posts: 158

PostPosted: Thu 12 May, 2011 4:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for the input, 17th century was what I thought as well. Not generic enough so I'll keep looking.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Likes: 10 pages
Reading list: 13 books

Spotlight topics: 7
Posts: 5,908

PostPosted: Thu 12 May, 2011 11:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Actually, that's fine for late 15th c. You get single-piece construction both early and late, with the two-piece(+) in the middle. The Medieval Armour From Rhodes shows a number of such breasts, including examples from Spanish, Italian and German/Austrian armourers, all of the last quarter-century (like the two examples below). It would be nice if the breast in question had a fauld, but one sometimes sees breasts worn without faulds in German/Austrian artwork of the period, so it's not essential.

This form is similar to the later 16th and 17th c. styles, although many of those have a more pronounced keel and, in some cases, a peascod form that rules them out for earlier periods.

The only thing I don't like about the breast in question is the treatment of the edges, which give the impression of a strong but incomplete turn. If I were buying this I'd ask the armourer to close the turn, either rounded or boxed. At first glance there appear to be gusssets here but closer inspection reveals an embossed gutter that looks strange to me. I wonder if that's a misinterpretation of a photo of a gusseted breast. Might just be a type I haven't seen.



 Attachment: 18.68 KB
image-2.jpg


 Attachment: 222.34 KB
brust.gif


-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)


Last edited by Sean Flynt on Thu 12 May, 2011 12:00 pm; edited 2 times in total
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Eric Hejdström




Location: Visby, Sweden
Joined: 13 Mar 2007

Posts: 184

PostPosted: Thu 12 May, 2011 11:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would not go as far as calling that thing a reproduction...
View user's profile Send private message
Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Likes: 10 pages
Reading list: 13 books

Spotlight topics: 7
Posts: 5,908

PostPosted: Thu 12 May, 2011 11:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here's an example of an early 15th c. single-piece keeled breast (ca. 1427). Note that it's boxier than later examples, and tends more toward the Kastenbrust style.


 Attachment: 193.72 KB
7006455.JPG


-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Likes: 10 pages
Reading list: 13 books

Spotlight topics: 7
Posts: 5,908

PostPosted: Thu 12 May, 2011 12:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here's an interesting one of ca. 1469. Note color and form of the breast at left, plus the absence of a fauld even though there are legs and vambraces.


 Attachment: 160.98 KB
1469breast2.JPG


-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Lafayette C Curtis




Location: Indonesia
Joined: 29 Nov 2006
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 2,689

PostPosted: Wed 18 May, 2011 6:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

To my inexperienced eyes, one thing makes the breastplate look quite unlike a 17th-century one: the waistline is rather too low. It could work for the 15th or the 16th, though.
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Dating of reproduction breastplate
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum