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Jon K.




Location: US
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PostPosted: Mon 14 Feb, 2011 11:17 am    Post subject: Windlass Mace Project         Reply with quote

Hi,

First let me say that I am totally new to collecting weapons. I am not really all that "handy" but I might be up to undertaking this task. I can get an old Windlass German Mace- with the black and brass finish. I love the mace. I hate the black and brass finish. My question is, if I were to obtain a Birchwood & Casey Cold Bluing kit, would I be able to remove the black finish on the mace? What if I went out and got an angle grinder? Would I be able to achieve the finish like the picture below?

http://www.myArmoury.com/images/reviews/mrl_gmace_a_s.jpg

How hard would this be?

-Jon K.
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Julien M




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PostPosted: Mon 14 Feb, 2011 11:26 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Jon, and welcome to the forum!

I'm not sure what windlass uses to blacken their maces, but a Birchwood & Casey Cold Bluing kit will not help to remove it, as it is intended to produce the opposite effect. You don't need an angle grinder either, much too abrasive! In many cases, to remove a blackened or blued finish, you just need steel wool or scoth brite (and oil) and a bit of elbow grease. If that does not work, you may need something more abrasive...and I would try a fine grit sandpaper (let say 240). You should not have great difficulties to achieve the finish you showed on the picture and removing the factory black finish will in most cases leave a nice patina to the steel.

Cheers,

J
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Jon K.




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PostPosted: Mon 14 Feb, 2011 11:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Julien M wrote:
Hi Jon, and welcome to the forum!

I'm not sure what windlass uses to blacken their maces, but a Birchwood & Casey Cold Bluing kit will not help to remove it, as it is intended to produce the opposite effect. You don't need an angle grinder either, much too abrasive! In many cases, to remove a blackened or blued finish, you just need steel wool or scoth brite (and oil) and a bit of elbow grease. If that does not work, you may need something more abrasive...and I would try a fine grit sandpaper (let say 240). You should not have great difficulties to achieve the finish you showed on the picture and removing the factory black finish will in most cases leave a nice patina to the steel.

Cheers,

J


Thanks for your advice and I could be be mistaken, but I think the Birchwood Kit comes with a De Bluing solution as well. Any help is always appreciated.

-Jon
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Mon 14 Feb, 2011 11:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Rust and Blue Remover works well, but get the mace first and see if it's actually blued. I've heard some later versions were painted. Either way, a brass brush bit for an electric drill can be handy in those crevices.
-Sean

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Joel Chesser




Location: Oklahoma
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PostPosted: Mon 14 Feb, 2011 1:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If it's just paint that should not be to hard. I purchased a Cold Steel pole axe a couple years back when they were on closeout and it had a layer of hideous black paint on the head. I went to Wal-Mart and got some paint remover, sprayed it on and wiped it off with a wet rag i believe. Very easy. Just wear a good pair of rubber gloves when doing it. I used cheap latex gloves and the remover ate through them and burned a little. Other than that it was incredibly easy.
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Leo Todeschini
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PostPosted: Mon 14 Feb, 2011 3:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chances are the black is paint and so just use paint stripper, the gold will be a very thin brass plate and so start by dulling it with coarse wire wool and decide from there.

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Colt Reeves





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PostPosted: Mon 14 Feb, 2011 6:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I actually am in the process of doing the same thing to the "modern" Windlass German Mace. It appears to be painted.

I've been attacking it with sandpaper but it is very slow going. At this point I'm about to throw in the towel and get some paint remover. (Tried the sandpaper because Sean's review said it was actually blackened, not painted, although that doesn't seem to be the case with mine.) I guess that doesn't help you much, especially if your's is not painted, but that's my 2 cents.

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Joel Chesser




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PostPosted: Tue 15 Feb, 2011 1:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yeah i seem to remember doing the sandpaper thing on the CS Poleaxe head for a bit. Finally I thought to heck with this and got paint stripper. MUUUUUCH better option.
..." The person who dosen't have a sword should sell his coat and buy one."

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Ant Mercer




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PostPosted: Tue 15 Feb, 2011 7:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi,

I have the newer version and it is definitely painted. It was heavy-duty paint though: even extra-coarse sandpaper only barely scratched it. I ended up taking it off with bog standard paint stripper - I think it was Nitromors: http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/ser...yId_165495 , easily available from all DIY stores and my local supermarket!

The paint came off very easily, and left a nice matt steel finish underneath, as per your picture. I then blued the whole thing with birchwood casey. Looks much better now and well worth the investment in time and stripper.

Cheers,

Ant
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Jon K.




Location: US
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PostPosted: Tue 15 Feb, 2011 11:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ant Mercer wrote:
Hi,

I have the newer version and it is definitely painted. It was heavy-duty paint though: even extra-coarse sandpaper only barely scratched it. I ended up taking it off with bog standard paint stripper - I think it was Nitromors: http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/ser...yId_165495 , easily available from all DIY stores and my local supermarket!

The paint came off very easily, and left a nice matt steel finish underneath, as per your picture. I then blued the whole thing with birchwood casey. Looks much better now and well worth the investment in time and stripper.

Cheers,

Ant


Do you have a pic of the finished product? Thanks for the help everyone!
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Ant Mercer




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PostPosted: Tue 15 Feb, 2011 2:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yep, no problem. Won't be for a couple of days as I'll be away from my computer 'til Monday, but asa soon as I get back i'll post something.

Thanks,

Ant
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Tue 15 Feb, 2011 3:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

As mentioned in Sean Flynt's review, the older version of the Windlass maces were blued.

Having said that, there is no reason to guess about what the new versions are: the description from Museum Replicas catalog states that they are powder coated.

There you have it.

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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Tue 15 Feb, 2011 3:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
the description from Museum Replicas catalog states that they are powder coated.

There you have it.


Which is a very durable finish if one wants to protect from rust but is very hard to remove if just sanding it down,.

Not very attractive and not very historical although I haven't seen this particular mace up close so it's my assumption. Wink

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Victor R.




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PostPosted: Tue 15 Feb, 2011 3:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
Nathan Robinson wrote:
the description from Museum Replicas catalog states that they are powder coated.

There you have it.


Which is a very durable finish if one wants to protect from rust but is very hard to remove if just sanding it down,.

Not very attractive and not very historical although I haven't seen this particular mace up close so it's my assumption. Wink


Soooooo, what you're saying is that the powder coated cross & pommel on my Windlass German War Sword is not an historically accurate treatment? I had no idea! What about the "Made in India" on the blade? Would that be problematic as well? Laughing Out Loud
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Tue 15 Feb, 2011 3:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Victor R. wrote:

Soooooo, what you're saying is that the powder coated cross & pommel on my Windlass German War Sword is not an historically accurate treatment? I had no idea! What about the "Made in India" on the blade? Would that be problematic as well? Laughing Out Loud


Unless it's stamped " Made in INDIA 1457 ": Then in that case it's historical. Wink Razz Laughing Out Loud Cool

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Jon K.




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PostPosted: Wed 16 Feb, 2011 8:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
Nathan Robinson wrote:
the description from Museum Replicas catalog states that they are powder coated.

There you have it.


Which is a very durable finish if one wants to protect from rust but is very hard to remove if just sanding it down,.

Not very attractive and not very historical although I haven't seen this particular mace up close so it's my assumption. Wink


OK...so how I am getting it off?
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Chuck Russell




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PostPosted: Thu 17 Feb, 2011 4:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

know anyone that has a sandblaster? like a auto repair or welding shop etc?
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Jon K.




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PostPosted: Thu 17 Feb, 2011 7:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chuck Russell wrote:
know anyone that has a sandblaster? like a auto repair or welding shop etc?


LOL No, I live in New York City/Metro Area. Sandblasters are for country folk. LOL Razz Are you sure that the finish is really powder coated on?Maybe KOA has an older model.
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Jon K.




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PostPosted: Thu 17 Feb, 2011 9:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
Nathan Robinson wrote:
the description from Museum Replicas catalog states that they are powder coated.

There you have it.


Which is a very durable finish if one wants to protect from rust but is very hard to remove if just sanding it down,.

Not very attractive and not very historical although I haven't seen this particular mace up close so it's my assumption. Wink


Just called MRL. They say that the finish is painted.
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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Thu 17 Feb, 2011 9:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jon K. wrote:
Jean Thibodeau wrote:
Nathan Robinson wrote:
the description from Museum Replicas catalog states that they are powder coated.

There you have it.


Which is a very durable finish if one wants to protect from rust but is very hard to remove if just sanding it down,.

Not very attractive and not very historical although I haven't seen this particular mace up close so it's my assumption. Wink


OK...so how I am getting it off?


Abrasives would work but it might involve a lot of work. Wink Question Sad

Well the chemical paint remover solution seems to have worked for others assuming that the finish is the same kind of paint you want to remove.

Quoted from a previous post:
Ant Mercer wrote:

The paint came off very easily, and left a nice matt steel finish underneath, as per your picture. I then blued the whole thing with birchwood casey. Looks much better now and well worth the investment in time and stripper.

Cheers,

Ant

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