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Miodrag Zlatanovic





Joined: 01 Feb 2011

Posts: 3

PostPosted: Tue 01 Feb, 2011 11:24 am    Post subject: A sword with unknown origin         Reply with quote

I have in my possession a sword whose origin I don't know.Some told me that dates from 15th century and that it's a German sword, some told me that it's a Viking sword. It weight is 900 grams and it has a little mark on it perhaps as a signature of a person who made it. This is all I know about it. I would like to know his origin and even his price if there is one. There are some pictures of it, so if anyone could tell me something more about it, I would be very grateful. Regards!


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Allen Foster





Joined: 17 Feb 2008
Reading list: 4 books

Posts: 244

PostPosted: Tue 01 Feb, 2011 12:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Can you provide a close up view of the handle?
"Rise up, O Lord, and may thy enemies be dispersed and those who hate thee be driven from thy face."
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Scott Woodruff





Joined: 30 Nov 2005
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Posts: 601

PostPosted: Thu 03 Feb, 2011 6:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Intriguing. I especially would like a closer view of the hilt. Is the pommel broken off?
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Cornelis Tromp




Location: Holland
Joined: 03 Jan 2010

Posts: 83

PostPosted: Fri 04 Feb, 2011 3:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi,

I think it started as a 14thC/15THC sword with a pommel! (The crozier mark has been frequently used in the 14Th and 15thC on medieval sword blades and stands for loyalty to ruler and church)
during its working life probably In the 16thC century it must have been changed in the matter of a hunting sword or great knife. the blade is shortened in order to fabricate the wide tang and grip plates are riveted on. riveted grips are hardly seen before 1500.
cross can or cannot be the original one. still a very interesting piece not sure about its balance w/o a counterweight/ pommel.

best,
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Mikko Kuusirati




Location: Finland
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Reading list: 13 books

Posts: 960

PostPosted: Sat 05 Feb, 2011 3:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Whatever it is, it's certainly not a viking era sword. My amateur guess would be a 16th Century German hunting sword, possibly fashioned from an older blade (like Cornelis just said).

Close-ups of the hilt would be very helpful - and I think I can just make out another sign above the crosier in the second photo, just below the guard; a closer look at that would also be interesting.

PS. Oh, and if you have measurements besides weight, especially blade and grip lengths, that'd help, too. I can make a very rough guess based on the proportions, of course, but I'd rather not. Happy

The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
Rush in and die, dogs -- I was a man before I was a king.
-- R. E. Howard, The Road of Kings
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Simon G.




Location: Lyons, France
Joined: 02 Jun 2008

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 238

PostPosted: Sat 05 Feb, 2011 12:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi again Miodrag,

I already replied to this over on SFI. Perhaps it's my post you refer to regarding it being a Viking sword. In fact, I had suggested that the combination of a wide blade and a very short guard made me think of an Early medieval sword, but indeed it is clearly not Viking or Early medieval, as I had stated at the time.

Allow me to repeat a question I asked over here, too: is there only one fuller (groove) running down the blade? I'm unsure from the photos and it could help dating the blade.

Cornelis & Mikko, very good theory. I can see now how this could've been a rather beautiful greatsword blade in the beginning. What piques my curiosity is still this tiny, tiny guard, strikes me as odd for the 16th c. hunting sword or no... Not disputing your theory, however, it seems to make a great deal of sense. And I suppose it could be the work of a rather unskilled cutler/blacksmith, as guard and grip don't seem to be of very good quality... In which case it is a shame he cut this blade (okay, I'm partial to big wide greatswords, guilty as charged).

Regards,

Simon
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