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David Kite




Location: Clinton, IN USA
Joined: 20 Feb 2004

Posts: 94

PostPosted: Tue 31 Aug, 2004 7:21 pm    Post subject: criteria, rules, guidelines for sword reviews         Reply with quote

I browsed the site, but couldn't find anything. I was wondering what the criteria, the rules, and/or any guidelines were for submitting sword reviews to the site. Obviously I can use the existing reviews as a model, but I didn't know if there was anything else specifically looked for. Also, is there a maximum or minimum length for reviews?

In addition to the information people already tend to give, I plan to pit my swords against varied targets to evaluate their durability.

Soft targets: Tatami mats; I may eventually get around to raw lamb or pork shoulders, but it's not in the foreseeable future; cloth; padded cloth; leather

Hard targets: staves/pole-weapon shafts; steel buckler; maille; other swords (in a safely controlled environment)



Thanks
David Kite
ARMA in IN
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Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Tue 31 Aug, 2004 7:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm thrilled that you're interested in sharing with the comunity!

Anybody wishing to contribute content to our site can refer to our Contributor Center for some basic guidelines. It will talk about the necessary photographs and whatnot, as well. Once you decide you want to, and are able to, participate, contact me and I'll direct you to our content guide that will give the specifics for the review.

While we don't have a minimum length for the reviews, we have a baseline expectation for the value of the contents of the article. Each article has to cover certain points and offer the right amount of value to our readers.

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Lee Watts




Location: Wales, UK ,europe
Joined: 25 Aug 2003

Posts: 144

PostPosted: Wed 01 Sep, 2004 10:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
I'm thrilled that you're interested in sharing with the comunity!

Anybody wishing to contribute content to our site can refer to our Contributor Center for some basic guidelines. It will talk about the necessary photographs and whatnot, as well. Once you decide you want to, and are able to, participate, contact me and I'll direct you to our content guide that will give the specifics for the review.

While we don't have a minimum length for the reviews, we have a baseline expectation for the value of the contents of the article. Each article has to cover certain points and offer the right amount of value to our readers.


hey thats a brilliant article Nathan its helped me take some fantastic pictures..thanks for sharing the info.
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Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
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PostPosted: Wed 01 Sep, 2004 10:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm very eager to read this one! It reminds me that several years ago on the ARMA forum we were discussing the possible value of using ballistic gelatin in test cutting. Seems like it might have SOME value, especially if molded in, say, two liter bottles and/or around sticks/bamboo to approximate limbs/bones and then wrapped in leather, cloth, armor, etc. To my knowledge, nobody has tried this yet. It would take lots of thought and work, of course, and would still fall far short of actual period combat testing. Cheaper than a side of beef, anyway.

Good luck with this, David!

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Peter Johnsson
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Location: Storvreta, Sweden
Joined: 27 Aug 2003
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PostPosted: Wed 01 Sep, 2004 1:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hmm...
I wonder if ballistic gelatin is not too sticky? I have not worked with it so Im only guessing here.

Gelatin might behave much like flesh when shot at, but that is no guarantee that it behaves like flesh when cut.

If it is sticky it will be like trying to cut semi-cured glue, and that will not yield very realistic results. A gelatinous material that clings to the blade will make the sword drag in the cut.

Flesh is slick but still fibrous. As it has been cut it does not offer much in the way of friction.
I think well soaked news papers (folded back + staples cut away) is a more realsitic approximation of flesh.
Semihard plasitc pipe can be fulfilling the role of bone. Bamboo is a tad too hard, I should think (if it is not fresh).

As long as the paper is really wet all through it behaves very much like beef (Ive been using this type of target quite a bit, and it seems to work well).
The lubrication afforded by the water adds an important aspect in the cut.

..just a thought.
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Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

Location: Birmingham, Alabama
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PostPosted: Wed 01 Sep, 2004 2:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very interesting....Thanks, Peter!
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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David Kite




Location: Clinton, IN USA
Joined: 20 Feb 2004

Posts: 94

PostPosted: Thu 02 Sep, 2004 5:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow, thanks guys.

I've been hearing quite a bit about using newspaper recently, but for some reason I keep forgetting about it. I'll definitely add it to my list.

So what does everyone think about using wooden dowels (soaked or not) as a substitute for bone instead of using bamboo or plastic pipe (which I assume would just be PVC pipe)?

David Kite
ARMA in IN
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Peter Johnsson
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Location: Storvreta, Sweden
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PostPosted: Thu 02 Sep, 2004 10:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

David Kite wrote:
Wow, thanks guys.

I've been hearing quite a bit about using newspaper recently, but for some reason I keep forgetting about it. I'll definitely add it to my list.

So what does everyone think about using wooden dowels (soaked or not) as a substitute for bone instead of using bamboo or plastic pipe (which I assume would just be PVC pipe)?

David Kite
ARMA in IN


Wooden dowels can work, but depending on the wood is more or less satisfactory. There is a hard brittleness to wood that is not like living bone (as I have understood). To mimic bigger bones one might be tempted to used larger diameter dowels. This is not always the safest way to go as a misaligned cut might (in a worst case scenario) make the edge of the sword fail in a bad way (like chipping). I have yet to see this, but it is a gut feeling. Dry wood is a very dense material. It pinches agressively on the edge in a cut. The edge of a sword has less belly than the edge of an axe. Therefore there is less steel to wedge the wood apart during the cut. This is an important aspect of the function of the axe edge. It is designed to cut (and splinter) wood. This is not the intended fiunction of the edge of a sword. If you choose a target that is beyond the endurance of the edge geometry of the blade, things might go wrong. an ordinary broom handle should offer no risk, but I feel it is still not an ideal target.
I would suggest going for some sort of plastic pipe.
Cutting green bamboo is much closer to the intended function of a sword edge. The material is hollow, thereby causes less friction and "pinch". The freshness of the material might also offer a little lubrication? All this is lacking in dry wood.
Sadly, green bamboo is many times hard to get...

The plastic pipe I use in *not* pvc pipe, but another material I sadly have not the proper name for. This product is used in modern plumbing as a substitute for copper pipe. The tubes are thicker in the wall than pvc and is less britle. It is a hard plastic but it also has a flexibility to it. Pvc easily shatters on impact. This plastic is tougher and will cut better with a well placed cut. It can still shatter, but not as readily as pvc.
To my experience so far it is also not too harsh on the edges, even if it is tough for its dimension.
I will try to get the proper brand name and post it here.
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