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Michael B.
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Location: Chugiak, AK
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PostPosted: Thu 30 Dec, 2010 11:54 am    Post subject: Interesting body defence         Reply with quote

Ran across this artwork of Hugh O'Neil, Earl of Tyrone, 1550-1616. It looks like a coat of brigandine over chain. The brigandine spalder (shoulder defense) is interesting. Thoughts?





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Michael Bergstrom
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Timo Nieminen




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PostPosted: Thu 30 Dec, 2010 12:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks like an armpit protector is there too.

Cut the armhole on the body too high, and you can't move your arms easily. Cut it too low, and there's a big gap. A solution: have a separate piece that sits tight up against the bottom of the top of the upper arm, to cover this armpit-gap in the body armour. Looks like this one might be attached to the spaulders.

Armpit protectors like this were a standard part of Chinese brigandines. A good example is the one shown in Stone, which has lots of buttons/points/laces. I've not seen the details of how one is worn, but I expect that it attached to the spaulder (and will help secure the spaulder), and maybe the long laces attach (loosely) to the body, stopping it from flapping open, exposing the gap. Can't attach tightly to the body, since it needs to move up and down with the arm. (Any Chinese armour wearers out there know how it's worn?)

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Michael B.
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Location: Chugiak, AK
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PostPosted: Thu 30 Dec, 2010 1:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The more I look at this...
Is this covered armour?

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Michael Bergstrom
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Thom R.




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PostPosted: Thu 30 Dec, 2010 5:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The O'Neill portrait you posted is not from 1570 but is from a Victorian rendition of an earlier woodcut and has been questioned as to its accuracy. Eek! Actually I think at this point it is safe to say that academically, the image shown has been proven to be inaccurate and a bit of a victorian fantasy/whimsy. for reference, see the post by Mr. Millman in this thread:

Armour of Hugh O'Neill

http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t...ght=oneill

it has been discussed before in several threads.........
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Michael B.
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Location: Chugiak, AK
Joined: 18 Oct 2007

Posts: 356

PostPosted: Thu 30 Dec, 2010 5:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Excellent, thanks. It was a bit odd to my eyes.
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Michael Bergstrom
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