Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Etruscan warrior Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Connor Lynch





Joined: 27 Jul 2010

Posts: 50

PostPosted: Mon 16 Aug, 2010 10:01 am    Post subject: Etruscan warrior         Reply with quote

Does anyone know what an Etruscan warrior may have looked like? If anyone has a picture i looked couldnt find anything.
View user's profile Send private message
Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Mon 16 Aug, 2010 11:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have moved this topic to the Off-topic Talk forum.

Please note the description for this forum:

"Discussions of general history and other miscellaneous topics relating to arms and armour that do not specifically fit our other forums"

Thank you.

.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
T Franks




Location: Chicagoland Suburbs, Illinois
Joined: 20 Jul 2010
Likes: 12 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 86

PostPosted: Mon 16 Aug, 2010 12:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey Connor, check out a book called Hannibal and the Enemies of Rome by Peter Connoly. They had it at my local library and it is a excellant resource to have. Not only does it provide illustrations of these warriors, but it also shows the actual archeological evidence of weapons and helmets to show you the real deal. It's not just about Hannibal and the Celts either; It shows arms and equipment of the Etruscans, Samnites, hill peoples, you name it. The general history in this book is pretty basic and brief but it is a great visual guide and reference for arms and equipment. Also, If you check the "show us your helms thread" Matthew Amt has a neat example of a Villanovan helmet & cuirass.

Last edited by T Franks on Tue 17 Aug, 2010 9:56 am; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message
Connor Lynch





Joined: 27 Jul 2010

Posts: 50

PostPosted: Mon 16 Aug, 2010 1:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yeah ive been looking at that thread alot. The Villanovans were before the Etruscans soon Etruscans became Romans.
View user's profile Send private message
T Franks




Location: Chicagoland Suburbs, Illinois
Joined: 20 Jul 2010
Likes: 12 pages
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 86

PostPosted: Mon 16 Aug, 2010 1:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here are some pages that might help. The first two pages are on the Etruscans. Sorry the helmet kinda gets cut off there in the bottom right corner, but there is an illustrated one on the opposite left.

Etruscan page 1
http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b379/Brennos/etruscan1.jpg
Etruscan page 2
http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b379/Brennos/etruscan2.jpg


Than here are some later Etruscans

Later Etruscan page 1
http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b379/Brennos/lateetruscans1.jpg
Later Etruscan page 2
http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b379/Brennos/lateetruscans2.jpg
View user's profile Send private message
Dan Howard




Location: Maitland, NSW, Australia
Joined: 08 Dec 2004

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 3,184

PostPosted: Mon 16 Aug, 2010 2:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

As can be seen from the illustrations, Italian warfare was heavily influenced by the Greeks, who had colonised southern Italy. Until the emergence of Rome and the Camillan reforms in the 4th century BC, Italians fought in phalanxes with Greek-style panoplies.
View user's profile Send private message
Connor Lynch





Joined: 27 Jul 2010

Posts: 50

PostPosted: Mon 16 Aug, 2010 3:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yea i was about to say why the armour was more Greek looking. Also i see later Etruscans starting to wear Montefortinos.
View user's profile Send private message
Matthew Amt




Location: Laurel, MD, USA
Joined: 17 Sep 2003

Posts: 1,298

PostPosted: Mon 16 Aug, 2010 8:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Avete!

Yes, Peter Connolly's books are excellent for this sort of thing, overall. "Greece and Rome at War" is a good basic to have in any case. There is also an Osprey on Early Roman Armies which is quite good.

Here's a photo by Dan Z. of me in my Villanovan kit:

http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l126/cnaeus...mulus3.jpg

(Thanks Mr. Franks!) The helmet is often called "Etruscan" but is actually a Villanovan style. The "poncho" cuirass is copied from the original on display in the University of Pennsylvania Museum in Philadelphia.

The Villanovans were the actual people who became the Romans. The Etruscans arose about the same time, but are a separate ethnic group. They ruled Rome for about a century but were tossed out about 510 BC and were eventually conquered by the Romans. At their earliest point, Etruscan arms and armor would have been similar to that of the Villanovans and other Italian groups. At their height, the wealthiest men were equipped basically as Greek hoplites, backed up by ranks of men with more local gear, hence the pectoral plates, Montefortino and other Italian helmets, oval or oblong shields, etc.

Oh, if you do a Google image search on "Etruscan Warrior" you'll find some good stuff, including a couple figurines, frescoes, and some reconstructions.

Have fun!

Matthew
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Connor Lynch





Joined: 27 Jul 2010

Posts: 50

PostPosted: Tue 17 Aug, 2010 12:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yea i never new Villanovans soon became Romans. I thought they soon became Etruscans but that cant be since Romans had wars with Etruscans
View user's profile Send private message
Lafayette C Curtis




Location: Indonesia
Joined: 29 Nov 2006
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 2,689

PostPosted: Wed 18 Aug, 2010 3:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

How good is the information about the Samnites here, I wonder? Might have some relevance for Etruria too.

http://www.sanniti.info/smweap01.html
View user's profile Send private message
Connor Ruebusch




Location: Cincinnati
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

Posts: 97

PostPosted: Thu 19 Aug, 2010 12:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Weren't the Romans Etrurian people? I do think the people of Rome revolted against their local Etrurian king (Etruria at this time being much like Greece, a collection of allied city states) under the leadership of some fellow named Brutus. And they then started the republic, right? And didn't the Etruscans themselves (and by proxy the Romans) descend from the Villanovans? I'm pretty sure that's the way of it...

{EDIT: I just now read Matthew's post in full, and it certainly explains the different ethnic identities of the Villanovans and Etruscans in full! So please disregard that last paragraph--I mistook Etruscan influence on Rome for genetic descent. Heheh...}

Also, how effective were those little "poncho" style breastplates, and the small disc ones? They seem to offer comparatively little protection to the torso as a whole. Although they do look cool. Any word on why the Etruscans didn't develop a more complete cuirass?

Connor
View user's profile Send private message
Dan Howard




Location: Maitland, NSW, Australia
Joined: 08 Dec 2004

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 3,184

PostPosted: Thu 19 Aug, 2010 4:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Connor Ruebusch wrote:
Any word on why the Etruscans didn't develop a more complete cuirass?

They did.
View user's profile Send private message
Matthew Amt




Location: Laurel, MD, USA
Joined: 17 Sep 2003

Posts: 1,298

PostPosted: Thu 19 Aug, 2010 7:25 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Connor Ruebusch wrote:
Also, how effective were those little "poncho" style breastplates, and the small disc ones? They seem to offer comparatively little protection to the torso as a whole. Although they do look cool. Any word on why the Etruscans didn't develop a more complete cuirass?


As Dan says, full cuirasses were quite common among the Etruscans, as well as with other Italian people. They would have been worn by the wealthiest warriors. Pectorals were common among less wealthy men, offering better protection than just a tunic, for a lot less cost (and weight!) than a complete cuirass. And as you point out, they look good! Bling was very important in ancient warfare, and looking impressive was the whole reason for crested helmets and such.

By the end of the Monarchy, the Roman army had a regular system to determine how much armor a man wore, according to his social class, which in turn was dictated by his wealth. So the upper class had full cuirass, greaves, helmet, and shield, and each succeeding class had a little less.

Strictly speaking, there is only one known example of the poncho cuirass, and I suspect that it may have been a funerary or ceremonial piece. Only the breastplate survives, and the shoulders are too damaged to tell if there were connections for a backplate, or merely straps to secure it. It's also actually too *large* for good armor--it's a good 16 inches wide across the shoulders, which limits arm movement. A full bronze cuirass generally measures only about 9 or 10 inches across the chest between the armholes.

Vale,

Matthew
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Off-topic Talk > Etruscan warrior
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum