Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Ww1 german armour Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Connor Lynch





Joined: 27 Jul 2010

Posts: 50

PostPosted: Fri 06 Aug, 2010 1:20 pm    Post subject: Ww1 german armour         Reply with quote

A little similar to Mycean armour im not sure if im spelling mycean right.
View user's profile Send private message
Philip Montgomery




Location: Houston
Joined: 29 May 2008
Likes: 2 pages

Posts: 83

PostPosted: Fri 06 Aug, 2010 1:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Interesting armor. Many years ago, I read about and saw a picture of German armor from World War I. Connor, did you have a question about the armor? Do you know anything about it? What German units wore the armor? Do you know anything about the steel or the design?
Philip Montgomery
~-----~
"A broken sword blade fwipping through the air like a scythe through rye does demand attention."
View user's profile Send private message
Connor Lynch





Joined: 27 Jul 2010

Posts: 50

PostPosted: Fri 06 Aug, 2010 2:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I dont know much about it. I just wanted to post it , all i know is that it is from ww1used to stop bullets.
View user's profile Send private message
Scott Hrouda




Location: Minnesota, USA
Joined: 17 Nov 2006
Likes: 15 pages
Reading list: 87 books

Posts: 643

PostPosted: Fri 06 Aug, 2010 2:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It is fun to compare and contrast with this picture of mycenaean armor.


 Attachment: 4.8 KB
Mycenaean-armor.jpg


...and that, my liege, is how we know the Earth to be banana shaped. - Sir Bedevere
View user's profile Send private message
Connor Lynch





Joined: 27 Jul 2010

Posts: 50

PostPosted: Fri 06 Aug, 2010 4:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yes the helmets are different though, that helmet is made out of boar tusks i have read. Other than that the armour is very similar. I wonder how the Germans thought of that kind of armour without looking at actual Mycenean armour. The only thing is that the color of the armour doesnt match the color of the helmet.
View user's profile Send private message
Jonathan Hopkins




PostPosted: Fri 06 Aug, 2010 5:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It is somewhat similar, but if you look at the German armor from a different angle you will see that it does not enclose the body like the Mycenaean armor.

Image from Illinois National Guard WWI Exhibit
View user's profile Send private message
David Sutton




Location: Bolton, UK
Joined: 06 Mar 2007
Likes: 15 pages
Reading list: 39 books

Posts: 230

PostPosted: Sat 07 Aug, 2010 4:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The armour also resembles some forms of 14th Century coats of plates, like this one excavated from Visby:




'Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better than not to think at all'

'To teach superstitions as truth is a most terrible thing'

Hypatia of Alexandria, c400AD
View user's profile Send private message
JG Elmslie
Industry Professional



Location: Scotland
Joined: 18 Jun 2009
Reading list: 28 books

Posts: 257

PostPosted: Sat 07 Aug, 2010 5:24 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

the designer/artist/craftsperson in me combined with the bitter, jaded cynic at this point, and I cant help but say:

Is'nt it strange... humans are all the same shape, and we end up with design solutions that are fundamentally similar for the same target goals....

weird, that, is'nt it?
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Lin Robinson




Location: NC
Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Likes: 6 pages
Reading list: 6 books

Posts: 1,218

PostPosted: Sat 07 Aug, 2010 10:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Truly there is little new under the sun. All sorts of things have been copied over generations.

A little background on the German armor. Production figures indicate about 500,000 sets were made, mostly in the middle of the war when trench warfare began in earnest. The armor was issued to snipers - a steel brow plate to fit on the 1916 helmet was also issued during that time - and shock troops who were tasked with raiding enemy trenches. It proved to be too heavy and bulky for the type of movements required by trench raids and seems to have been discarded fairly quickly. The brow plate on the helmet hung around a bit longer, although its added weight tended to cause the helmet to tilt forward and obscure the soldier's vision. It is hard to see how this thing would have helped the sniper, whose survival depended in large measure on stealth, which this piece of equipment probably hampered more than it helped. The body armor would just extra weight for a sniper. A skilled sniper will never expose much of anything to the enemy he is trying to shoot.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
View user's profile Send private message
Alan H. Weller




Location: Palo Alto, CA
Joined: 31 Oct 2006

Posts: 28

PostPosted: Sat 07 Aug, 2010 12:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Connor Lynch wrote:

"I wonder how the Germans thought of that kind of armour without looking at actual Mycenean armour"

The most famous early archaelogist of Mycenaean sites was the German, Heinrich Schliemann.

Heinrich Schliemann (German pronunciation: [ˈʃliːman]; (January 6, 1822, Neubukow, Mecklenburg-Schwerin – December 26, 1890, Naples) was a German businessman and archaeologist, and an advocate of the historical reality of places mentioned in the works of Homer. Schliemann was an important archaeological excavator of Troy, along with the Mycenaean sites Mycenae and Tiryns. His successes lent material weight to the idea that Homer's Iliad and Virgil's Aeneid reflect actual historical events.
View user's profile Send private message
Romulus Stoica




Location: Hunedoara, Transylvania, Romania
Joined: 26 Oct 2006

Posts: 124

PostPosted: Sat 07 Aug, 2010 12:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

In W.W.1 and in the '20, there were a lot of discussions and experiments about/with different form of body armor. Many armies used body armor in W.W.1 but with little succes, I know about, english, US, german, french, belgian and russian armies. There were a lot of stange designs like visored helmets and coat-of-plates-like armor. I know there is a W.W.1 body armor book in pdf format, free to download somewhere on the Internet for those interested
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Connor Lynch





Joined: 27 Jul 2010

Posts: 50

PostPosted: Sat 07 Aug, 2010 1:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Oops my mistake i didnt know. Knowing that they have had to have based their armour on ancient myceaen
View user's profile Send private message
Jonathan Hopkins




PostPosted: Sat 07 Aug, 2010 3:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

IMO the resemblance is superficial. Other than looking vaguely similar and being displayed in a similar manner, I think the construction is very different.
View user's profile Send private message
Thom R.




Location: Tucson
Joined: 26 Jul 2007
Reading list: 30 books

Posts: 630

PostPosted: Sat 07 Aug, 2010 6:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Helmets and body armor in modern warfare (1920)
by Bashford Dean
http://www.archive.org/details/helmetsbodyarmor00deanuoft

there is an interesting thread that started on Ned Kelly's armour here:

http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t...=ned+kelly
View user's profile Send private message
Jonathan Hopkins




PostPosted: Sat 07 Aug, 2010 7:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thom,
Thanks for the great links, and the Dean link in particular!

Jonathan
View user's profile Send private message
Ozsváth Árpád-István




Location: Romania
Joined: 27 Apr 2008

Posts: 131

PostPosted: Sat 07 Aug, 2010 8:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

500,000 seems a bit exagerated for something weird and experimental like this. At least I never found a single piece. Maybe they soon realized that this won't protect soldiers from enemy fire.


 Attachment: 114.09 KB
pancel.jpg
They used armor plates like this. The 5-6 mm thick armor wasn't enough to stop a rifle bullet. I saw quite a few plates with bulletholes. Sometimes they used double sets of these.

 Attachment: 54.07 KB
szurony.jpg
No comment...

 Attachment: 123.6 KB
Some believed that an entrenching tool will stop bullets. They were wrong. [ Download ]
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Ww1 german armour
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum