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Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > C.200BCE Ancient Celtic Broadswoad and Scabbard Reply to topic
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Mark A Smith




Location: Portland, OR
Joined: 13 Nov 2009
Reading list: 7 books

Posts: 30

PostPosted: Wed 28 Apr, 2010 7:50 am    Post subject: C.200BCE Ancient Celtic Broadswoad and Scabbard         Reply with quote

I was visiting Harvey Wither's site, and was amazed to see a Celtic Broadswoad and Scabbard offered for sale.
As he says, most examples of these swords with scabbards intact are in national museums or important private collections.

The hilt style is of typical La Tene form and comprising bronze mounts. Blade of large and wide proportions - blade width of around two inches. Scabbard appears to be made of iron and is in excellent shape. For 7995.00 it's too rich for my blood but one can drool, and learn from looking at the detail of the photos.

It's not every day we can see one of these up close.



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Scabbard Detail 2

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Scabbard Detail 1

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Blade Detail 2

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Blade Detail 1

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Pommel Detail 2

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Pommel Detail 1

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Hilt Detail

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Sword and Scabbard c. 200BCE

"...nothing can hurt me as long as I keep this bucket on my head."
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Johan Gemvik




Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: 10 Nov 2009

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 793

PostPosted: Wed 28 Apr, 2010 10:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Excellent sword.
Too bad I don't have the money either, I could give it a good loving home. Hopefully someone else will.

The tang seems surprisingly thin for a cutting sword, are they all like this from this period?
I also notice it's a hollow diamond cross section, it seems to me then that swords went from hollow diamond to central fuller and back to hollow diamond over the ages. Very interesting, I expect it has to do with adding stiffness to the blade to increase strength and resilience, first in a soft iron sword and then later again to battle ever stronger armour. But that's just a theory, I know a lot of you guys here subscribe to the "swords can't cut through armour unless you're super human" club. Still wouldn't stop swordsmiths of the age from trying to make swords do that though, so it could still be the intended reason regardless if it really could.

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
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Andrew Maxwell




Location: New Zealand
Joined: 03 May 2009

Posts: 90

PostPosted: Wed 28 Apr, 2010 4:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Johan Gemvik wrote:
I also notice it's a hollow diamond cross section, it seems to me then that swords went from hollow diamond to central fuller and back to hollow diamond over the ages. Very interesting, I expect it has to do with adding stiffness to the blade to increase strength and resilience, first in a soft iron sword and then later again to battle ever stronger armour. But that's just a theory, I know a lot of you guys here subscribe to the "swords can't cut through armour unless you're super human" club. Still wouldn't stop swordsmiths of the age from trying to make swords do that though, so it could still be the intended reason regardless if it really could.


The increased stiffness of a diamond cross-section is good for opposing plate. It isn't good for cutting plate.
Increased stiffness makes the sword a better thruster (see Oakeshott type XVa &c).

Men do not care how nobly they live, but only how long, although it is within the reach of every man to live nobly, but within no man's power to live long. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca
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