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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Sat 17 Apr, 2010 4:46 pm    Post subject: Question regarding antiquing         Reply with quote

Hi everyone,

I am in the process of antiquing a 12th C. Del Tin with a salt and vinegar solution. It seems as though the blade is taking on more corrosion than the hilt components.

Now, many period pieces would have had an iron hilt with a higher carbon or steel blade. Wouldn't iron or a lower carbon steel corrode faster generally than the higher carbon material utilized in the blade, or am I mistaken?

If this is so I will just antique the blade until I am comfortable and then pay extra attention to the guard and pommel- while covering the blade. I guess I could be over-simplifying things as I am want to do. . . .

What say you?
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Sat 17 Apr, 2010 5:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Del Tins all used to come with a clear coat of lacquer/varnish. I think they still do. Has yours been stripped? Maybe the difference is in how the solution is eating through the varnish, if it's still there. If it's removed or had none, then I have no clue. Happy
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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Sat 17 Apr, 2010 5:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chad Arnow wrote:
Del Tins all used to come with a clear coat of lacquer/varnish. I think they still do. Has yours been stripped? Maybe the difference is in how the solution is eating through the varnish, if it's still there. If it's removed or had none, then I have no clue. Happy


Now I feel stupid!!

I bet you're right. I got this sword from Fluvio himself- on a vacation in 99'. I bet it still has that varnish! It is turning brown though- in a similar way to my eating knife.

Do you think I should immediately stop the process, wipe off the corrosion, remove the varnish, and start again? I have steel wooled this thing over the years- I think- but never for the purpose of removing a homogenous coating.

Still the hilt does look very different- perhaps only that has the varnish- though that doesn't really make any sense.
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Sat 17 Apr, 2010 6:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Use engine degreaser on all steel before rusting it, as you would with a cold blue.
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Kirk Lee Spencer




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PostPosted: Sat 17 Apr, 2010 6:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Question regarding antiquing         Reply with quote

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:
Hi everyone,

...Wouldn't iron or a lower carbon steel corrode faster generally than the higher carbon material utilized in the blade, or am I mistaken?...



What say you?



Hi Jeremy...

Seems like I remember reading somewhere that higher carbon means faster corrosion, not slower...

take care

ks

Two swords
Lit in Edenís flame
One of iron and one of ink
To place within a bloody hand
One of God or one of man
Our souls to one of
Two eternities
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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Sat 17 Apr, 2010 6:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Flynt wrote:
Use engine degreaser on all steel before rusting it, as you would with a cold blue.


Indeed the sword was covered in warnish so the brown stuff was just on the surface and a pain to get off. So I will go about removing it.

I don't see why one should apply a degreaser to all steel however. My Tod's stuff knife has no varnish and has responded with normal corrosion. Am I missing something?

Thanks.
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Justin King
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PostPosted: Sun 18 Apr, 2010 7:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

All else being equal a higher carbon steel will corrode faster than low-carbon. All else is rarely equal, however, when discussing modern steel alloys. How a steel is heat treated can affect how it etches and corrodes so there is a lot of potential for different results when doing a project like this.
DT's hilt components are often acid-washed to give a dull grey appearance. If you do not polish it down to bare steel first your etch may have to eat through this layer of oxidation and/or any remaining varnish before you get the results you want. The existing oxidation layer (if there is one) can change colors somewhat as it is affected by your etch, so it is best to start with freshly-polished/sanded parts. If one part is stubborn to take the etch you can try heating the part. Generally you do not want it hot enough to boil the etch solution when it is applied, anywhere from 150-190 F. is usually effective. Polishing back with fine steel wool after etching is another way to help even out the results.
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Justin King
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PostPosted: Sun 18 Apr, 2010 7:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeremy V. Krause wrote:
Sean Flynt wrote:
Use engine degreaser on all steel before rusting it, as you would with a cold blue.


Indeed the sword was covered in warnish so the brown stuff was just on the surface and a pain to get off. So I will go about removing it.

I don't see why one should apply a degreaser to all steel however. My Tod's stuff knife has no varnish and has responded with normal corrosion. Am I missing something?

Thanks.


Fingerprints and other types of oils/grease can inhibit/delay the effect of your etch. If you want very spotty results, you can leave them as is, if you want more even results you should de-grease as thouroughly as you can first.
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