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Julien M




Location: London
Joined: 14 Sep 2005

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PostPosted: Fri 26 Mar, 2010 7:30 am    Post subject: Lost wax castings         Reply with quote

Hi Guys,

I'd love to make hilt parts using this method: carving guard and pommel in wax and send them to a foundry to have them cast in either bronze or steel. I've looked around on the internet for quotes and further information with little success.

I have many questions:

what is the row material (I know it's wax, I've seen it called "machinist wax" here and there too) and more importantly where can I buy it? Links would be very welcome.

Secondly do you know of a site where they offer such services? All the ones I've checked seem to be oriented towards the industry and producing large volumes.

And finally would anyone have an idea of the price?

Cheers,

J
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Ken Speed





Joined: 09 Oct 2006

Posts: 654

PostPosted: Fri 26 Mar, 2010 7:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

This may be a bit of help; I suggest you talk to a sculptor or two. They should be able to give you some leads on the wax, foundries costs, etc. and possibly some techniques as well.
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Addison C. de Lisle




Location: Maine
Joined: 05 Nov 2005
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Posts: 613

PostPosted: Fri 26 Mar, 2010 8:43 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wax for casting usually comes in three colors which indicate hardness; blue, purple, and green. Blue is the softest and green is the hardest. It looks like Peter/Albion uses the blue wax for their models. I don't know if this also applies outside the US though. They can all be sanded to reduce clean up time once the piece is cast. Here is a link to a US jewelry supply store:

http://www.riogrande.com/MemberArea/ProductPa..._answer=31

It can be carved with hand tools, either specialized tools like these:

http://www.riogrande.com/MemberArea/ProductPa...ving+Tools
(Kate Wolf tools are expensive but they are the best)

or used dentist tools. There is also a rasp for wax to remove material more rapidly.

You can also make your own by flattening and filing the ends of old bicycle wheel spokes.

I hope this helps.

www.addisondelisle.com
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Julien M




Location: London
Joined: 14 Sep 2005

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PostPosted: Fri 26 Mar, 2010 9:23 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Addison,

It does help thank you!

It is quiet affordable too. So now it's a question of finding a foundry to make those wax carvings into steel preferably, and to have an idea of the costs.

Any infos welcome.

Cheers,

J
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JG Elmslie
Industry Professional



Location: Scotland
Joined: 18 Jun 2009
Reading list: 28 books

Posts: 250

PostPosted: Fri 26 Mar, 2010 12:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

sent a PM with a small list of my own experiences doing lost-wax casting in bronze and steel...
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Nathan Beal





Joined: 02 Apr 2006

Posts: 68

PostPosted: Fri 26 Mar, 2010 9:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Julien M wrote:
It is quiet affordable too. So now it's a question of finding a foundry to make those wax carvings into steel preferably, and to have an idea of the costs.


Try giving Dave Hewitt and Steve Lunn at white rose armouries a try (they have casting equipment on site to do at least bronze for you). http://www.whiteroseapparel.com/.

HTH
N.

Beware of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup.
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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
Joined: 10 Feb 2005
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Mar, 2010 6:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

For bronze you might contact Mercier Sveiter. http://www.re-enactment.biz/index.html
Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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Leo Todeschini
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Location: Oxford, UK
Joined: 12 Nov 2006

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PostPosted: Sat 27 Mar, 2010 10:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

for mouldmaking and wax materials try either Alec Tiranti in London or Cooksons in Hatton Garden, London.

Tod

www.todsworkshop.com
www.todcutler.com
www.instagram.com/todsworkshop
www.facebook.com/TodTodeschini
www.youtube.com/user/todsstuff1
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Jon Terris




Location: U.K.
Joined: 14 Nov 2005

Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sat 27 Mar, 2010 1:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I was about to suggest Tiranti for wax and materials.

http://www.tiranti.co.uk/

You could try Taylors in (Haverhill, Suffolk) http://www.taylorsfoundry.co.uk/ once you have the waxes done

or Hookers in (Brightlingsea, Essex) can do the whole thing if you take them a prototype (they do require a minimum order though so one-offs are probably not a good idea)

Hope this helps,

JonT
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Peter Lyon
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Location: New Zealand
Joined: 20 Nov 2006
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PostPosted: Sat 27 Mar, 2010 1:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

One suggestion: make a silicone rubber mould of your wax before you send it off for casting. Sometimes things don't work out during casting (shells crack, waxes damaged, spruing doesn't work properly for metal flow, etc), and you can always make more if you have a mould, otherwise it is risking a lot of work on that one chance to get it right.
Still hammering away
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Nathan Beal





Joined: 02 Apr 2006

Posts: 68

PostPosted: Sat 27 Mar, 2010 3:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jared Smith wrote:
For bronze you might contact Mercier Sveiter. http://www.re-enactment.biz/index.html


Mercia Sveiter don't cast in house (they bought the moulds from blue/wayland when he decided to get out of the business).

Before you go nuts with making moulds you may want to consider how many of something you want and the requirements of the foundry you are working with. Most take your master in any form (you don't need to work in wax, they make a mould from it anyway so that they can make more if they need to), so you may want to talk it through with them before you start investing in tins of RTV or similar.

HTH
N.

Beware of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup.
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Julien M




Location: London
Joined: 14 Sep 2005

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PostPosted: Sun 28 Mar, 2010 5:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi guys,

thanks a lot for these infos, that more than enough to get me started (especially those shops in London Tod...very convenient!) I will make a mould of the finished work Peter...that's very good advice Happy

Nathan Beal wrote:

Before you go nuts with making moulds you may want to consider how many of something you want and the requirements of the foundry you are working with.


Well I'm not planing on starting a workshop or produce batches of swords here so I'll just need a unique piece of each wax I'll be doing...and yes I will probably go nuts about making moulds depending on how well I manage to handle the carving (fishtail pommel!) and also on the quotes the foundry will give me...

Cheers,

Julien
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John Waller




Location: UK
Joined: 11 Dec 2009

Posts: 8

PostPosted: Mon 29 Mar, 2010 6:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have used this company for a low-volume brass casting http://www.quality-castings.co.uk/

They gave excellent service. Give them a call and ask for Lou.
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