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Andrew Howe





Joined: 14 Sep 2009

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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 6:16 am    Post subject: Saex Knife?         Reply with quote

Does anyone know where I could find a sharpened saex knife? Not a stage combat one like the Iberia Practical scramasax, but one that I could use as a dagger. Because of my rank in this reenactment society at my school, I can only carry a weapon with a blade of 6 in. or under, and I'd prefer 6 in., it seems like a good length.
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 7:16 am    Post subject: Re: Saex Knife?         Reply with quote

Andrew Howe wrote:
Does anyone know where I could find a sharpened saex knife? Not a stage combat one like the Iberia Practical scramasax, but one that I could use as a dagger. Because of my rank in this reenactment society at my school, I can only carry a weapon with a blade of 6 in. or under, and I'd prefer 6 in., it seems like a good length.

Period accurate saxes are almost non-existant as reproductions. Generally you'll be more period accurate without a sax then with one, unless you carfully select the correct sax that's appropriate for the place and period, and are able to find a good reproduction of it or have it custom made. What period and region is it for?

Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
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Neil Schiff




Location: Las Vegas, NV
Joined: 03 Jun 2009

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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 10:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You could try this one...recently released, and very inexpensive. It is from the new Gen2 line.

http://www.imperialweapons.com/product/IP-007.html

It's available other places, as well, this was just the first link I found. It's not appropriate to all periods and locations, of course, but is a fairly accurate, if generic, basic small seax.
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Ken Speed





Joined: 09 Oct 2006

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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 10:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Andrew,

There's an outdoor/hunting knife that's made by a Norwegian company called Bruseletto ( that may not be spelled exactly right) called the Norren which might do double duty for you. The blade is less than 6" long but it could easily pass for a small sax and other times be a usable knife for hunting, hiking, whatever.
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Tom King




Location: florida
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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 11:50 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Dude nice you signed up! There only 3.5in but the paul chen scramasaxes are the best looking small knives www.viking-shield.com/knives.html The Brusletto Norron knife also looks good.
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 11:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Neil Schiff wrote:
You could try this one...recently released, and very inexpensive. It is from the new Gen2 line.

http://www.imperialweapons.com/product/IP-007.html

It's available other places, as well, this was just the first link I found. It's not appropriate to all periods and locations, of course, but is a fairly accurate, if generic, basic small seax.
The closest this comes to is the continental (Germany, France, Netherlands) narrow sax from the late 6th - early 7th century. The pommel shape is wrong, and the blade is much too short. The scabbard is also completely different. This is a more typical narrow sax, which is 45cm in length:
http://1501bc.com/page/rijks_museum_oudheden/0214214a.JPG

Saxes of different periods/locations are completely different, down to the blade shape/size, grip, scabbard.

Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 12:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tom King wrote:
Dude nice you signed up! There only 3.5in but the paul chen scramasaxes are the best looking small knives www.viking-shield.com/knives.html The Brusletto Norron knife also looks good.

Of the Paul Chen saxes, only the first (W1113) has any resemblance to a historical sax. Differences with originals are the grip length, which should be a lot longer. And the wire wrap at the front of the hilt does not occur on originals. This sax would be appropriate for UK, Ireland and possibly Germany during the 8-11th century (not for Vikings). The remainder of all other knives are completely unlike any historical saxes.

Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
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Andrew Howe





Joined: 14 Sep 2009

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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 12:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I found this,
http://knivesbynick.co.uk/knife_kits.htm Ctrl-F Seax Blades
I think I should get that and the stag handle. Do you think that that ones accurate? I believe so, but I'm no sure.
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Adam S.





Joined: 01 Sep 2006

Posts: 146

PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 12:43 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Andrew,
If you have a moment, look at the links in Jeroen's signature. There's an amazing amount of good, historical seax information there.

Also, what time period are you looking at?
Does time period matter?
If not then what does matter?
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Andrew Howe





Joined: 14 Sep 2009

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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 12:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

High middle ages and Renaissance(Late 15th to Early-Mid 17th Century), I know, large range of years.
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David Wilson




Location: In a van down by the river
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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 4:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Andrew Howe wrote:
High middle ages and Renaissance(Late 15th to Early-Mid 17th Century), I know, large range of years.


I don't think you'll be wanting a seax at all, then.... that's a bit late for that sort of thing....

David K. Wilson, Jr.
Laird of Glencoe

Now available on Amazon: Franklin Posner's "Suburban Vampire: A Tale of the Human Condition -- With Vampires" https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072N7Y591
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Hadrian Coffin
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Location: Oxford, England
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PostPosted: Fri 15 Jan, 2010 8:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quote:
Of the Paul Chen saxes, only the first (W1113) has any resemblance to a historical sax. Differences with originals are the grip length, which should be a lot longer. And the wire wrap at the front of the hilt does not occur on originals. This sax would be appropriate for UK, Ireland and possibly Germany during the 8-11th century (not for Vikings). The remainder of all other knives are completely unlike any historical saxes.


W1113 is by Volund Forge aka Michael Pikula, not Paul Chen/Hanwei. I don't think Paul Chen/Hanwei has made any sort of historical sax. Happy
Cheers,
Hadrian

Historia magistra vitae est
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Lin Robinson




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PostPosted: Sat 16 Jan, 2010 6:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tom King wrote:
Dude nice you signed up! There only 3.5in but the paul chen scramasaxes are the best looking small knives www.viking-shield.com/knives.html The Brusletto Norron knife also looks good.


The Paul Chen small seaxes are discontinued and long gone.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Peter Johnsson
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PostPosted: Sat 16 Jan, 2010 2:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

With this time frame you should be looking for a bollock knife or some kind of dagger or hunting knife. The seax belongs to an era long gone.

A stiletto perhaps?
A folding knife?

It very much depends on your "persona".
Start by shaping an outline in place, time and social standing. Then you can think of a proper blade to carry.
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Tom King




Location: florida
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PostPosted: Sat 16 Jan, 2010 3:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lin Robinson wrote:
The Paul Chen small seaxes are discontinued and long gone.

Well Jim apparently has some left over from when they were run.
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Lin Robinson




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PostPosted: Sat 16 Jan, 2010 7:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tom King wrote:
Lin Robinson wrote:
The Paul Chen small seaxes are discontinued and long gone.

Well Jim apparently has some left over from when they were run.


Or maybe he has not changed his web site. They have been out of the catalog for a year or more.

Lin Robinson

"The best thing in life is to crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women." Conan the Barbarian, 1982
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Tom King




Location: florida
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PostPosted: Sun 17 Jan, 2010 2:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Lin Robinson wrote:
Or maybe he has not changed his web site. They have been out of the catalog for a year or more.
The sites a warehouse so if he has them he has them. They were probably discontinued because they didnt sell, which also explains why he's stuck with some!
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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PostPosted: Mon 18 Jan, 2010 1:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hadrian Coffin wrote:
Quote:
Of the Paul Chen saxes, only the first (W1113) has any resemblance to a historical sax. Differences with originals are the grip length, which should be a lot longer. And the wire wrap at the front of the hilt does not occur on originals. This sax would be appropriate for UK, Ireland and possibly Germany during the 8-11th century (not for Vikings). The remainder of all other knives are completely unlike any historical saxes.


W1113 is by Volund Forge aka Michael Pikula, not Paul Chen/Hanwei. I don't think Paul Chen/Hanwei has made any sort of historical sax. Happy
Cheers,
Hadrian

I misread the catalog as all being Paul Chen. My deepest apologies to Michael Happy

Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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PostPosted: Mon 18 Jan, 2010 2:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Andrew Howe wrote:
I found this,
http://knivesbynick.co.uk/knife_kits.htm Ctrl-F Seax Blades
I think I should get that and the stag handle. Do you think that that ones accurate? I believe so, but I'm no sure.

If a sax were what you were looking for (that would mean roughly 5th-11th century AD), then nope Happy Of all saxes I've seen (probably in the thousands, including drawings and photos of examples I've not seen personally), none have antler handles. They are either wood (frequently covered in leather), or in some cases horn and in a single case ivory. The hilts for most types of saxes are straight, and long (over 20cm in length).

Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
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Andrew Howe





Joined: 14 Sep 2009

Posts: 16

PostPosted: Thu 28 Jan, 2010 9:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Seaxs were in prevalence during the 1100s and 1200s(the 12th and 13th century), as well as the aforementioned eras after that, they were still in use in Ireland and Northern Italy, just not as prevalent. My persona is an Irishman.
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