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Dustin Faulkner




Location: BOERNE, TX
Joined: 20 Jul 2008

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PostPosted: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 9:20 pm    Post subject: Homemade warhammer         Reply with quote

Hello:

I just wanted to show everyone a warhammer I made during the fall at a local blacksmith shop. It was inspired by many seen in the hafted weapons album in this web site. It began as a 16oz. ball-pien hammer. I cut off the handle. Then I pounded & hammered everything to the shape I wanted with repeated heatings in a fire. The head's face was filed to four squares in a "waffle-iron" sort of pattern. The head was installed onto a new, longer handle I got at a local hardware store - with shims pounded into the top. I've wondered about the possibility of such a project since I was a boy. I guess I proved the concept.

Auf duetsch, dies ist ein schlacthammer oder kriegshammer? Ja?

If only I knew how to make a coronel head and a metal handle. Does anyone know how? I'd really like to make another with a coronel head. Hopefully, I'll learn how to make my own halberd one day.

Enjoy!

Sincerely,
Dustin Faulkner
Texas, USA



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Homemade warhammer made from a ball-pien hammer.

DUSTIN FAULKNER
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Reece Nelson




Location: Overland Park KS
Joined: 18 Oct 2007
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Posts: 257

PostPosted: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 9:31 pm    Post subject: hammer         Reply with quote

Very nice! I really like weapons that have that simple and functional look. Nothing fancy...just straight to the point (literally) :P
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Craig L.




PostPosted: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 10:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice job, Dustin -- looks quite handy!

Cheers,
Craig
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Christopher VaughnStrever




Location: San Antonio, TX
Joined: 13 Jun 2008
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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan, 2010 5:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have had similar interests, though this is a very nice item to see;of what one can do at his home (sort to speak)
Experience and learning from such defines maturity, not a number of age
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Pauli Vennervirta





Joined: 12 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 5:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

What about using a rock pick or a geologists hammer as the starting point? I have been thinking about getting one.
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Arne Focke
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Location: near Munich, Germany
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 7:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice work.

The words you were looking for in German are "Kriegshammer" or "Streithammer".
In this case i would use "Rabenschnabel", because of its beak.

So schön und inhaltsreich der Beruf eines Archäologen ist, so hart ist auch seine Arbeit, die keinen Achtstundentag kennt! (Wolfgang Kimmig in: Die Heuneburg an der oberen Donau, Stuttgart 1983)
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Sean Flynt
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 8:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some of y'all might be interested in today's Deal of the Day at MRL. $65!


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-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Stephen Renico




Location: Detroit
Joined: 01 Feb 2009

Posts: 51

PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 11:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Pauli Vennervirta wrote:
What about using a rock pick or a geologists hammer as the starting point? I have been thinking about getting one.


I've made two out of those. They work quite well:





"The state that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards, and its fighting by fools." -Thucydides.
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JG Elmslie
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Location: Scotland
Joined: 18 Jun 2009
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 2:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Pauli Vennervirta wrote:
What about using a rock pick or a geologists hammer as the starting point? I have been thinking about getting one.


that's almost exactly what I used for doing a prototype for a pole-hammer; stock removal to cut down the head and deepen the lightning cuts, and then waist in and facet the back-spike (well, back-spoon, really - rounded to avoid a point for reenactment). Having had the whole thing cut to shape, polished, etc, the plan is/was to try it out for a little while, and then to cast it up in an RTV rubber mould, make lost-wax castings from the moulds, and have them investment cast in carbon steel, and then hand-worked and finished off and stuck to hafts.

A plan as cunning as a fox with a degree in cunning, from oxford, only mildly undermined by the fact my local lumber-yard's been out of ash hafts for the last two months, and its therefore sitting gathering dust, while I wait for them to get some in.
Not that I could use it just now, given the weather... and a shoulder that's wonky in the cold.


regarding Mr Dustin Faulkner's original peice, I think what jumps out at me, is that the handle is far too modern in appearance. take the head, pop it onto a straight, octagonal section haft with wooden langet straps running down the two sides, and I think it'd go from "ok" to pretty damn good.
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Todd Webber





Joined: 01 Mar 2009

Posts: 6

PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 2:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am going attempt to make a similar project over the next few weeks. I am wondering if there are any methods to “antique” the hammer head?

I am going to sand and use linseed oil of the shaft.
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Julian Reynolds




Location: United Kingdom
Joined: 30 Mar 2008

Posts: 271

PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 3:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

JG Elmslie, can I make a suggestion?

For ash axe hafts, I just buy a load of cricket stumps. Straight grained English ash, 28" long, 1 1/4" min. diameter. I can pick up half a dozen for just over £20 (less if I scour the junk shops). I use them to make hafts for the tomahawk and boarding axe simulators I make for the WMA guys.

Julian



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Ron Reuter




Location: Southern Indiana
Joined: 04 Oct 2007

Posts: 56

PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 6:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very cool, I really like the head on your hammer Dustin.

I also made one out of a "rock" hammer. It was a fun project, but these type of hammers are very tough steel! I used a bench grinder and some round files to give it that warhammer look. I made the handle out of a piece of hickory I had.






Ron

www.yeoldegaffers.com
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JG Elmslie
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Location: Scotland
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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 9:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Julian Reynolds wrote:
JG Elmslie, can I make a suggestion?

For ash axe hafts, I just buy a load of cricket stumps. Straight grained English ash, 28" long, 1 1/4" min. diameter. I can pick up half a dozen for just over £20 (less if I scour the junk shops). I use them to make hafts for the tomahawk and boarding axe simulators I make for the WMA guys.

Julian


that is,as they say, dead cunning. I'll remember that for small sections of ash - thankyou.
I rather like the simulators you're doing there. Are those cast in RTV silicone, or the likes?


Regarding buying such hafts of course, there's just one little technical flaw...
I'm scottish. where can you find this "cricket" thing you talk about? Happy
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Julian Reynolds




Location: United Kingdom
Joined: 30 Mar 2008

Posts: 271

PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 1:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Silicone is for wimps - they're made from hardwood (iroko, beech, whatever I have lots of at the time) sprayed black.

They're tough, effective, look authentic/traditional at 20 paces and hurt a lot less than a re-enactment metal blunt. I use them for 18th Century WMA/reenactment because you aren't wearing any sort of armour or protection (no plate or shields, for instance) at this time in history and therefore a metal blunt would just cause massive damage if it accidentally connected with sufficient force.....

Anyway, I risk hijacking this thread so I'll sign off....

Julian
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Stephen Wheatley




Location: DORSET ENGLAND
Joined: 15 Nov 2008

Posts: 93

PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 5:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Slater's hammers work well too, I modified a couple a few years back although these days I'd rather forge and temper a head from mild steel. I like the idea of using cricket stumps as hafts but would love to find longer ash poles to use as hanlberd hafts, currently I use Homebase 35mm (1&3/8'') poles in softwood; thet look OK when oiled, but ash would be better, I just lack the time to cut and shape seven feet of hardwood myself!


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Stephen Wheatley
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Scott Jefcoats




Location: Covington County, Mississippi
Joined: 29 Aug 2010

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PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 10:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote




Question: When you made that, how did you shape the haft and langets to fit under the head and do you have any pictures of the pieces just prior to final assembly?

Because it looks like something I'd like to try Big Grin .
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Ron Reuter




Location: Southern Indiana
Joined: 04 Oct 2007

Posts: 56

PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 5:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Scott Jefcoats wrote:



Question: When you made that, how did you shape the haft and langets to fit under the head and do you have any pictures of the pieces just prior to final assembly?

Because it looks like something I'd like to try Big Grin .


I don't have a picture but I have created a graphic that I hope will show the method I used. The langets don't fit under the head. I bent them a bit so that they curved at the end, and then carved the wood a bit so that it appears that they disappear under the head. They are just actually butted up against the head.



Ron

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Zach Gordon




Location: Vermont. USA
Joined: 07 Oct 2008

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PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 11:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Historically would the langets have gone under the head? I heard somewhere they went over the head to hold it on, but i dunno if the guy was right. I'm intrigued.
Thnx
Z
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Ron Reuter




Location: Southern Indiana
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PostPosted: Sun 19 Dec, 2010 4:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Zach Gordon wrote:
Historically would the langets have gone under the head? I heard somewhere they went over the head to hold it on, but i dunno if the guy was right. I'm intrigued.
Thnx
Z


I didn't mean to imply that my method was historic, it is probably not. I wanted to add langets to it, and this was an easy way for me to finish them at the hammer head end. Even this method, though, would protect the wood handle from some strikes.

Ron

www.yeoldegaffers.com
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Scott Jefcoats




Location: Covington County, Mississippi
Joined: 29 Aug 2010

Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sun 19 Dec, 2010 8:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I don't have a picture but I have created a graphic that I hope will show the method I used. The langets don't fit under the head. I bent them a bit so that they curved at the end, and then carved the wood a bit so that it appears that they disappear under the head. They are just actually butted up against the head.

Thanks Ron Happy .
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