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Petr Florianek
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Joined: 01 Oct 2008

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PostPosted: Sat 09 Jan, 2010 1:52 pm    Post subject: Frankish Narrow sax and intro         Reply with quote

Hello! This is my first post, in this section, so I would like to Introduce myself. My name is (obviously) Petr Florianek and I live in Czech republic. I am part time maker specializing in Early Medieval/Dark ages stuff. I work with blades I made myself and also with blades of other maker, including Patrick Barta.
I do carving in wood, antler and bone, engraving, etching, leather work. I also started to forgeweld my own blades. I love to make cooperations with likeminded makers around the globe. I sometimes take commissions but mostly make what i want to do.

This first piece I want to present here is narrow sax. Its based on many examples found in France and Netherlands. Its based on finds from 6th century.

I forgewelded blade from wrought iron and something like O1 steel and forged the blade to shape. I filed and sanded blade and cut grooves and engraved snakes with chisel gravers. Fitings are wrought and are peened on the tang. Handle is ash covered with leather, glued with bone glue over 4 raisers for better grip.

Oal is 47 cm
Blade lenght is 33 cm


Let me know what you think and if you have questions
Petr

PS: I want to say thanks to Peter Johnsson and Jeroen Zuiderwiik for great help with resears on this one



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Stephen Curtin




PostPosted: Sat 09 Jan, 2010 4:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Petr and welcome

Thats a good looking seax you got there. I especially like the engraved snakes, are they taken from a historical example or are they your own design, either way nice work Big Grin

Éirinn go Brách
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R D Moore




PostPosted: Sat 09 Jan, 2010 6:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Petr

And allow me to welcome you to this forum as well. I've been following your projects on Don Fogg's forum and I'm very happy you have joined us. Please allow me to post a very small sample of work you have done that I've archived:



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"No man is entitled to the blessings of freedom unless he be vigilant in its preservation" ...Gen. Douglas Macarthur
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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Sat 09 Jan, 2010 7:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Petr: Welcome to the site and that is beautiful work. Big Grin
You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Petr Florianek
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PostPosted: Sat 09 Jan, 2010 8:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Stephen Curtin wrote:
....are they taken from a historical example or are they your own design....


part of both. bands of snakes and braids are often engraved on these weapons, but not this particular setup. I would call it "work in tradition" "or recreating a type"

To others: thanks for kind words and welcome.

Mr. Moore: heres a pic of finished pair of those you posted:
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Tim Lison




Location: Chicago, Illinois
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PostPosted: Sat 09 Jan, 2010 9:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looking good Petr! Keep them coming!
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Tim Seaton




Location: San Jose calif
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PostPosted: Sun 10 Jan, 2010 8:21 am    Post subject: vry kool         Reply with quote

well done sir Cool welcome to the fourm!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Jeremy V. Krause




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PostPosted: Sun 10 Jan, 2010 9:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Welcome Peter!

Those look great. I especially like that you are using traditional blade construction.
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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PostPosted: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 2:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'd like to especially add that this is one of the very rare sax reproductions that actually matches historical examples, including the engraving as is typical for narrow saxes. This is probably the most historically accurate narrow sax reproduction that is currently out there. And extra kudos for using wrought iron with a steel edge and not etching the wrought Happy
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
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Petr Florianek
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PostPosted: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 3:29 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Haha! Kudos for NOT making something :-)
The true is that as i welded the bilet much shorter tan actual blade and draw it by hand (i have more trust in my right hand than in welding on frozen anvil so i wanted to keep welding less then 20 cm). After drawing and filling and HT i gave the blade really quick etch to see where the weld line exactly runs. I was afraid that it could interfere with some scraping or engraving (not a case, it is far bellow. After that, sanded the etched layer out.
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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PostPosted: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 7:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Petr Florianek wrote:
Haha! Kudos for NOT making something :-)

Oh yes, I much appreciate extra efford put into historical accuracy, even if it's barely visible or even invisible in the end result. Most people would etch the wrought to show the pattern, even if it was no reason why the original would have been etched (except of course when there's patternwelding for visual purposes, and even then etching may not have been done in all cases).

Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
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Paul Hansen




Location: The Netherlands
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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan, 2010 2:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice work Petr! I'm looking forward to seeing more. Big Grin
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Antonio Lamadrid





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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan, 2010 4:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I just checked Mr. Florianek’s web and I could not stop the drooling.

The amount of top bladesmiths and armourers that Czekia (and to a minor degree Poland) produces has always amazed me. We have nobody around here. How bad is envy!
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan, 2010 5:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Antonio Lamadrid wrote:
I just checked Mr. Florianek’s web and I could not stop the drooling.

The amount of top bladesmiths and armourers that Czekia (and to a minor degree Poland) produces has always amazed me. We have nobody around here. How bad is envy!
Well, the only way to do something about that is to become one Happy
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
- Bronze age living history in the Netherlands
- Barbarian metalworking
- Museum photos
- Zip-file with information about saxes
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Petr Florianek
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 9:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I was cutler or hiltsmith before, i started forging because of long waiting lists at bladesmiths
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David Etienne




Location: Ittre, Belgium
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 10:29 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Petr Florianek wrote:
I was cutler or hiltsmith before, i started forging because of long waiting lists at bladesmiths


You did well, Petr, you have a gift. I really like your realisations and I'm eager to see the rest of your production.

Cheers,

David

P.S. I've just received my sword from Vladimir Cervenka. Are you all so talented in Czech Republic?
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Petr Florianek
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 11:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

well, hopefully no! :-) Thanks again, but i feel that i am on the beginning of my journey
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Ben Potter
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 12:18 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Vítejte na myArmoury Petr. Good to have you here.

(I hope that is right, language isn't my forte )

Ben Potter Bladesmith

It's not that I would trade my lot
For any other man's,
Nor that I will be ashamed
Of my work torn hands-

For I have chosen the path I tread
Knowing it would be steep,
And I will take the joys thereof
And the consequences reap.
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Dean Whitlock




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PostPosted: Thu 14 Jan, 2010 7:15 am    Post subject: Bone carving techniques         Reply with quote

Hello Petr,

I am very impressed by your workmanship. I haven't tried metalwork but I have done a little bone carving and you are far, far better than I am! Do you have some advice or suggestions you could share with us about how to work with bone?

Thanks very much,
Dean
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Petr Florianek
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PostPosted: Thu 14 Jan, 2010 8:17 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ben: good on you! almost without mistakes
Dean: ask me what you want to know, i will try to answer!
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