Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > Introducing... The Auxilia Spatha Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Howard Waddell
Industry Professional



Location: Wisconsin, USA
Joined: 18 Aug 2003

Posts: 716

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec, 2009 8:57 am    Post subject: Introducing... The Auxilia Spatha         Reply with quote

At long last!



More here:

http://www.albion-swords.com/swords/albion/ne...spatha.htm

Best,

Howy

Albion Swords Ltd
http://albion-swords.com
http://filmswords.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Bartek Strojek




Location: Poland
Joined: 05 Aug 2008
Likes: 23 pages

Posts: 447

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec, 2009 10:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow, news at Albion, and a very interesting ones!

The sword looks really fantastic, at least to me.
View user's profile Send private message
Tim Lison




Location: Chicago, Illinois
Joined: 05 Aug 2004
Likes: 1 page
Reading list: 6 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,502

Feedback score: 100%
(1 total ▮ 100% positive)
PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec, 2009 10:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Simply gorgeous. The dark colored grip is just beautiful! Another success at Albion!!!!
View user's profile Send private message
Chris Lampe




Location: United States
Joined: 07 Mar 2005

Posts: 211

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec, 2009 1:25 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've been looking forward to this particular sword for some time and it looks great!

How rigid is the blade on this sword?
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Josh Maxwell




Location: Michigan
Joined: 01 Jul 2009
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 55

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec, 2009 2:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've been looking at this sword for some time as well. The only thing that surprises me is how close the balance point is. Granted, the only other organic hilted sword I own is a Del Tin celtic longsword, but the balance point is twice as far out on my Del Tin than on this Albion. I'm curious as to how well one could cut with such light blade combined with a relatively close balance point.
View user's profile Send private message
Edward Hitchens




Location: Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
Joined: 10 Feb 2005
Likes: 1 page
Reading list: 9 books

Posts: 818

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec, 2009 2:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Beautiful! I love how the hilt turned out, especially the grip. Those colors go great together. Bravo!
"The whole art of government consists in the art of being honest." Thomas Jefferson
View user's profile Send private message
Stephen Curtin




PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec, 2009 3:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wow another great piece from albion to drool about for a while. I've been looking forward to see albions spathas for years now so I cant wait to see how the other ones turn out aswell. Keep up the good work guys Big Grin
╔irinn go Brßch
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
M. Eversberg II




Location: California, Maryland, USA
Joined: 07 Sep 2006
Reading list: 3 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,435

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec, 2009 3:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

There are not enough swords of this type on the market. Good work.

M.

This space for rent or lease.
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
Chris Artman




Location: USA
Joined: 12 Apr 2008

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 441

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec, 2009 7:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I ordered the Decurio, so looking forward to that Big Grin Looks great!
View user's profile Send private message
Bryan W.





Joined: 27 Oct 2007

Posts: 198

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Mon 21 Dec, 2009 11:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks awesome. I'm looking forward to the Alaris as well myself.
View user's profile Send private message
Peter Johnsson
Industry Professional



Location: Storvreta, Sweden
Joined: 27 Aug 2003
Reading list: 1 book

Spotlight topics: 3
Posts: 1,757

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Tue 22 Dec, 2009 3:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks all for positive response!

I am very glad to now see the Spathae reaching waiting customers and curious enthusiasts.
These have been long in development, for several reasons. Now that I have access to a 3d program so I can supply designs in a digital format, rather than drawings, means blades can be developed quicker and also adjusted or changed with less delay. Shorter time laps from concept to completed blade blank, means quicker R&D.

in the case with these spathae, the long developing time has actually worked out to their benefit. I have continually studied roman swords in the mean time, and learned new things along the way which has been implemented in the designs. I have had opportunity to make research trips especially to study roman swords to museums in Denmark, Netherlands and Germany (as well as studies on some roman blades found in Sweden). I┤ve also attend a conference on Roman Military Archaeology which was a wonderful learning experience as well as great fun.
Another important factor is that two major works on the roman sword has been published since the concept drawings. J°rgen Ilkjaer┤s last two volumes on the Illerup ┼dal find deals with the sword blades exclusively, and includes a detailed typology of spathae found all over Europe.
Also Christian Miks┤ two volume work on the roman sword during the imperial period have provided crucial information on dating, types and hilt forms.
Both of these works are must haves for the serious enthusiast of the roman sword.
The spathae that now are reaching the market have matured in their development several times over: they are much more authentic now than they would have been if they had been completed earlier.

To Chris: The blade is pretty rigid. You can force it to bend if you want to, but with its moderate length and sturdy section is is a stiff and lean sword. It is interesting to not that there are similarities between the roman spatha and the early chinese jian!

To Josh: Placing of balance point does not compromise cutting power. I have described the feeling of the sword as you hold it in your hand like this in the text on Albion┤s page:
"Our Auxilia has a comfortable heft that balance liveliness with hitting power. Overall weight is low and the distribution of mass results in a soft forward pull that helps direct the edge during a cut. It is easy to understand why swords such as these were essential weapons for the roman cavalry man."
This is an honest attempt to describe what the sword feels like and how it behaves.
These new spathae are built after the example of surviving originals. Their dimensions are genuine for their types. They behave like originals would when new. It is not like the military minded romans would have manufactured cavalry swords that did not do their job.... Cool

I have never handled the Del Tin celtic long sword and do not know how well it compares to actual original swords.
I have documented about a dozen celtic swords by now, and I can assure you they are not heavy or cumbersome, but much more agile and light than one would expect from the face view. As with the roman swords there are subtle but very important things in distal taper and details in cross section, that has an crucial impact on how these swords handle. As with all these things there is variation, but in general, celtic swords are not heavy bashers, but quick, agile and acutely cutting blades for skillful sword play.

Thanks for all your comments and questions!
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Chris Lampe




Location: United States
Joined: 07 Mar 2005

Posts: 211

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Tue 22 Dec, 2009 5:33 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter,

Thanks for the additional information!

I'm a big fan of the Chinese jian and in flattened-diamond cross-section swords in particular. This one is especially interesting to me because I know nothing about the detailed characteristics of the spatha blade and how it actually handles. It sounds like the type of handling characteristics I prefer in a sword.

I'm adding this one to my short wish-list.
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Darryl Aoki





Joined: 12 Oct 2006

Posts: 93

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Tue 22 Dec, 2009 7:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, heck. I guess it's time for me to start laying money aside for another sword. The Auxilia's really quite attractive, though it might be prudent to see what the other spathae'lll look like.
View user's profile Send private message
Josh Maxwell




Location: Michigan
Joined: 01 Jul 2009
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 55

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Tue 22 Dec, 2009 8:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Johnsson wrote:
Thanks all for positive response!

To Josh: Placing of balance point does not compromise cutting power. I have described the feeling of the sword as you hold it in your hand like this in the text on Albion┤s page:
"Our Auxilia has a comfortable heft that balance liveliness with hitting power. Overall weight is low and the distribution of mass results in a soft forward pull that helps direct the edge during a cut. It is easy to understand why swords such as these were essential weapons for the roman cavalry man."
This is an honest attempt to describe what the sword feels like and how it behaves.
These new spathae are built after the example of surviving originals. Their dimensions are genuine for their types. They behave like originals would when new. It is not like the military minded romans would have manufactured cavalry swords that did not do their job.... Cool

I have never handled the Del Tin celtic long sword and do not know how well it compares to actual original swords.
I have documented about a dozen celtic swords by now, and I can assure you they are not heavy or cumbersome, but much more agile and light than one would expect from the face view. As with the roman swords there are subtle but very important things in distal taper and details in cross section, that has an crucial impact on how these swords handle. As with all these things there is variation, but in general, celtic swords are not heavy bashers, but quick, agile and acutely cutting blades for skillful sword play.

Thanks for all your comments and questions!


As is the case with other celtic swords, the Del Tin model is very light at under 2 pounds with a very thin cross section and a tremendous amount of blade presence.

My only concern was that with such a light weight, the Auxilia may lose some cutting power. This thing sounds like it must handle like a feather, and if it has not lost any of its cutting potential than this is a sword that I place very high on my wish list.

Thank you for your time to answer my question.
View user's profile Send private message
Vincent Le Chevalier




PostPosted: Tue 22 Dec, 2009 10:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well...

THIS IS SPATHAAAAAAA!

Sorry. Couldn't resist. I feel better now Happy

Seriously, the wooden grip is really beautiful. I feel an urge to touch it just looking at the photos... Very attractive finish. I wonder how the others will turn out too, their blades seem to be more complex... which would make them even more attractive for me.

Regards,

--
Vincent
Ensis Sub Caelo
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Justin H. N˙˝ez




Location: Hyde Park, UT
Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Likes: 1 page

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 142

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Tue 22 Dec, 2009 12:22 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It IS rather beautiful. I like the sound of how it handles. Peter's description of how it handles reminds me of the spatha in the novel "Sword at Sunset". It sounds ideal. I can't wait to see how the other ones turn out, I agree with Vincent on the more complex blades.
With the handling characteristics it makes me wonder just how complex their blade techniques were. Have we been underestimating our ancestors' abilities or philosophy of the sword?...

"Nothing in fencing is really difficult, it just takes work." - Aldo Nadi
View user's profile Send private message
Peter Johnsson
Industry Professional



Location: Storvreta, Sweden
Joined: 27 Aug 2003
Reading list: 1 book

Spotlight topics: 3
Posts: 1,757

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Tue 22 Dec, 2009 12:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Justin H. N˙˝ez wrote:

....
With the handling characteristics it makes me wonder just how complex their blade techniques were. Have we been underestimating our ancestors' abilities or philosophy of the sword?...


I would say that this is very much the case, yes!
A popular idea is often promoted regarding early swords are crude and not quite up to the task. This applies to bronze age weapons, iron age swords, roman swords, viking swords....and so on.

It is also a common idea that roman swords were crude, not very advanced in geometry and shaping and generally very basic blades (no distal taper, uneven finish, indistinct form and so on). I do not agree with this view.
Some are pretty basic and obviously made in a hurry.
But many (most?) are very fine indeed. In those cases where blades look lopsided and unfinished, I suspect this is often a matter of rust and wear of time, rather than marks of making.
When we come to the flowering of the spatha we see some of the finest pattern welded blades in the european tradition.
The art and craft of the roman sword is very much worthy of our respect and detailed study.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Chris Artman




Location: USA
Joined: 12 Apr 2008

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 441

Feedback score: None
PostPosted: Sat 26 Dec, 2009 10:31 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bryan W. wrote:
Looks awesome. I'm looking forward to the Alaris as well myself.


The Alaris almost looks like a giant dagger, very cool!

I had a hard time picking between the 3, but ended up chosing the Decurio...
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > Introducing... The Auxilia Spatha
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2018 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum