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Jason M. Rogers




Location: Lorton Virginia
Joined: 24 Jul 2009
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PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 10:52 am    Post subject: Cutting and maring the finish.         Reply with quote

If you have cut with your sword please tell us what you cut and the efects on your finish. I have read in some of the preveous posts that heavy cardboard tubes can mar the finish. I am going to try to keep well inside the safe zone and keep the sword looking good. I had resolved not to cut, but I know me, when my Sovereign comes in I will be unable to resist the temptation to cut something Big Grin
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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
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PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 11:05 am    Post subject: Re: Cutting and maring the finish.         Reply with quote

Jason M. Rogers wrote:
If you have cut with your sword please tell us what you cut and the efects on your finish. I have read in some of the preveous posts that heavy cardboard tubes can mar the finish. I am going to try to keep well inside the safe zone and keep the sword looking good. I had resolved not to cut, but I know me, when my Sovereign comes in I will be unable to resist the temptation to cut something Big Grin


Well cardboard is abrasive so light scratches are to be expected.

With fruit like melons one can get a little staining even if one wipes the blade after every cut and lubricates the blade between cuts.

I guess if you use anything you will get something happening to any blade but it may be very subtle and can be easy to clean or restore the original finish or it can be more serious if one doesn't clean right away or cuts into abrasive or hard stuff.

Light wear is O.K. unless you want your sword(s) to stay " mint " but then they should only be touched with cotton gloves and kept under glass ! ( Well, sort of joking here but it depends on what type of collector or user you are. Wink Big Grin ).

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Jason M. Rogers




Location: Lorton Virginia
Joined: 24 Jul 2009
Likes: 4 pages

Posts: 30

PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 11:36 am    Post subject: Re: Cutting and maring the finish.         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:

Light wear is O.K. unless you want your sword(s) to stay " mint " but then they should only be touched with cotton gloves and kept under glass ! ( Well, sort of joking here but it depends on what type of collector or user you are. Wink Big Grin ).


You know, I truly would like nothing better than to keep the blade mint. But as I hinted at in my OP I completely and utterly lack willpower when it comes to not playing with my new toys. I have had any number of new toys that I wanted to keep mint but ended up playing too rough with. Like 4 wheelin' through brush with a brand new Jeep and scratching the paint right off of the car lot.

I will of course be careful and safe in regards to everyone keeping all their respective parts, I just don't want to start cutting stuff the first day and have a bunch of scratches on the blade before the "new" even wears off for me.

Obviously, swinging the blade and striking a nail on the cutting stand or some such is going to leave a mark. But how about wet newspaper wraped around thin PVC, or pool noodles. One inch branches?

I intend to stay away from fruit for the reason you mentioned. I am actualy thinking about going to the hardware store and getting a machette as a cutting stunt double or whipping boy for the young Sovereign. Laughing Out Loud
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 11:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Pool noodles are pretty gentle, but can leave minute scuff marks sometimes. If you hit the label, you might get adhesive on your blade that needs to be cleaned off.

I use PVC pipe to hold pool noodles in place (the pipe goes 6 inches or so up into the foam). I've hit PVC plenty of times. It can leave scratches/scuffs, too.

As I cut with Albion swords more often than other brands, I can easily maintain the finish with gray Scotchbrite. For stubborn stuff, I use the Scotchbrite with some Metal=Glo metal polish.

Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
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Martin Erben




Location: Germany, Düsseldorf
Joined: 10 Jul 2008
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PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 12:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If there will be scratches depends much on the degree of hardness. I only use blades between 58 and 61 Hrc and I never had any problems with the finish.
Who made your Blades? How "shiny" is the finish?
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Jason M. Rogers




Location: Lorton Virginia
Joined: 24 Jul 2009
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Posts: 30

PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 12:44 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Martin Erben wrote:

Who made your Blades? How "shiny" is the finish?


Albion Sovereign is the blade. I have only seen pics so it is impossible to describe the finish.

http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=17207
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Martin Erben




Location: Germany, Düsseldorf
Joined: 10 Jul 2008
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PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 12:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

My Albion (a Solingen) has now a very smooth finish. When I Bought it from a friend and it looked only slightly scratched even if he abused it for ripping wood and I was able to restore the finish with a ScotchBrite pad (If you ever do so, never go against the "grain", because the so caused scratches are very hard to remove). All Albions have around 57 Hrc, and I think this is the highest degree in mass-production so they have the most "abusable" finish.

Martin

Ps: sorry for my bad english....
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Jason M. Rogers




Location: Lorton Virginia
Joined: 24 Jul 2009
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Posts: 30

PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 1:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Martin Erben wrote:

Ps: sorry for my bad english....


Hey brother, don't sweat it. Your english is better than my german. Wink
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Bryce Felperin




Location: San Jose, CA
Joined: 16 Feb 2006

Posts: 552

PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 5:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I use three stages of maintenance when I get scratches or rust on my blade surfaces.

First I use a rust eraser and rub it over the blemish. This usually does the trick, but if not it's on to stage 2 with a scotchbrite pad of about 400-600 grit. That almost always works.

If my blade is polished up to a really shiny finish, then I next get out my 3M 2400 grit Micro-grit pad (they cost about $2.00 a pad) and start with that...then end up with polishing paste compound and a cotten rag. By then it's done.

Recently, I got some of the new Nano cloth polishing clothes. They're made for polishing and cleaning computer screens and TV's, so I'm planning on trying one out on on the next scratch on one of my swords in place of the polishing paste.

Make sure you do circular motions when using pads or polishing or you'll make more scratch marks and dull your blade surface.

For course for Albions and other blades with that aren't mirror polished, I'd just stick with the courser pads and only go to a 1200 grit pad if you really need to.

Go to the 3M site, they sell a lot of those grit pads at all kind of grit sizes. Everyone in my group uses those.
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Maurizio D'Angelo




Location: Italy
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PostPosted: Fri 07 Aug, 2009 3:01 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Martin Erben wrote:
If there will be scratches depends much on the degree of hardness. I only use blades between 58 and 61 Hrc and I never had any problems with the finish.
Who made your Blades? How "shiny" is the finish?


Martin Erben wrote:
My Albion (a Solingen) has now a very smooth finish. When I Bought it from a friend and it looked only slightly scratched even if he abused it for ripping wood and I was able to restore the finish with a ScotchBrite pad (If you ever do so, never go against the "grain", because the so caused scratches are very hard to remove). All Albions have around 57 Hrc, and I think this is the highest degree in mass-production so they have the most "abusable" finish.

Martin

Ps: sorry for my bad english....


is a great hardness. You sure?
Perhaps only those swords are suitable for cutting. I think, but I do not know. Question
I did not know that the swords could be so hard without chip.
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Luka Borscak




Location: Croatia
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
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Posts: 2,221

PostPosted: Fri 07 Aug, 2009 3:49 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Maurizio D'Angelo wrote:
Martin Erben wrote:
If there will be scratches depends much on the degree of hardness. I only use blades between 58 and 61 Hrc and I never had any problems with the finish.
Who made your Blades? How "shiny" is the finish?


Martin Erben wrote:
My Albion (a Solingen) has now a very smooth finish. When I Bought it from a friend and it looked only slightly scratched even if he abused it for ripping wood and I was able to restore the finish with a ScotchBrite pad (If you ever do so, never go against the "grain", because the so caused scratches are very hard to remove). All Albions have around 57 Hrc, and I think this is the highest degree in mass-production so they have the most "abusable" finish.

Martin

Ps: sorry for my bad english....


is a great hardness. You sure?
Perhaps only those swords are suitable for cutting. I think, but I do not know. Question
I did not know that the swords could be so hard without chip.


I think Albions are about 53Hrc.
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Martin Erben




Location: Germany, Düsseldorf
Joined: 10 Jul 2008
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Posts: 66

PostPosted: Fri 07 Aug, 2009 4:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Oh sorry, my mistake... I just looked again and the Albion Blades only have an average hardness of 54.4 Hrc (so they are much softer than I thought...)
Only Peter Johnssons swords have an average hardness of 57 Hrc (maybe that's why I thougt Albion Blades had the same hardness). On my own monosteel blades I use 58Hrc which is common for blades produced in Germany. These blades are still very flexible and don't chip. Even the sword with 61Hrc (made of damascus steel) did never chip and is extremely bendable! Here's a Picture of such a sword with around 61Hrc which was made by the german Bladesmith Markus Balbach from the same damascus steel I used:



 Attachment: 15.82 KB
biegen_2.jpg

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