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J. Abernethy





Joined: 17 May 2009

Posts: 44

PostPosted: Tue 04 Aug, 2009 10:34 pm    Post subject: My Odinblades Zweihander         Reply with quote

http://picasaweb.google.com/JordanMAbernethy/...directlink

Iím honored to present Odinblades latest creation, a 16th century Zweihander.

OA-72 1/4
Blade length-53 3/4
Hilt-18 Ĺ
Grip-14
Ricasso-8 1/4
Sharpened edge-43 1/4
Guard width-18
Width at lugs-5 Ĺ
Blade width at hilt-1 7/8
Blade width under lugs-2 3/8
Blade thickness at hilt 5/16
Blade thickness at tip-1/8
Blade material-203E/W2
Guard/pommel-5160H
8 lbs on the dot

When considering a sword I knew I wanted a big one. Looking around on some of the sword and blade forums, I came across a custom smith known for making large swords. I didnít want a production sword, I wanted MY sword. One that no one else would have. In the end, one that would be true to history while still being original. John Lundemo of Odinblades could fill that order. However, I wanted the greatest sword John had ever created and I know thatís just what I got! From his website and postings during the time I ordered it, I came across a beautiful pattern welded Zweihander John had made. I wanted one similar, only bigger and better. It needed Jerry Rados damascus for one thing and Jerry quickly agreed to the 6 foot project. I had originally intended on using damascus for the whole sword, but Iím so happy in the end with the darkened fittings I wouldnít change it if I could. I also wanted a fish tail style pommel, but John pushed for a more traditional style when considering historical accuracy. Iím so glad he did. John had kept me in the dark of how the fittings would actually look. I had some general requirements of what I wanted but trusted in his ability and skill to make me what I really wanted. I can honestly say its better than I imagined, and I have a good imagination!

This sword is damascus all the way through to the pommel, no weld at the tang Its 8 lbs weight makes it feel ďnot to heavyĒ in the hand when considering its tremendous length. Its so well balanced. It isnít much of a strain to hold the sword at your side and keep the tip off the ground. It balances perfectly when gripped in the ricasso. Iíve never held such a solid sword. It rings throughout the whole sword when it brushes against cloth. Its blade is truly stunning, high level random of 203E and W2. Jerry made it so the layers are very tight all along the edge.

I would like to thank Mr. Rados for his part in this amazing sword and wish him the best. Both John and Jerryís last names are etched into the blade on one side near the hilt between the fullers at my request.

We looked at many examples of Zweihanders and took ideas from multiple swords. Sword weights of this kind at this length were between 8 and 13 lbs. Iím pleased to have it come in on the lighter end of the scale. I ignorantly wanted it to be a little heavier, closer to 9 lbs; but even at only 8 lbs itís a beast. When held straight out, the tip dips very slightly, maybe Ĺ inch. I expected more. I thought being a big guy I would be able to handle this thing easily, I was wrong. Though most examples of battle swords of this style were shorter. I have a lot of respect for those soldiers in history who actually used something like this all the time. I am also a bit on the skiddish side because I donít want to bury the tip in the ground or do something stupid in which I make it harder on myself than it really is to handle.

I canít thank John enough for this masterpiece. He was great to work with, always letting me call to bug him and humoring me with his stories throughout the process. He has really become a true friend of mine as he would with any of his customers. I would recommend Odinblades to anyone looking for a real one-of-a-kind sword, especially a big one! He is known for his fantasy style swords, but I hope this and others show his skills that go beyond pre-conceived notions. He is able to create whatever you want, historical, fantasy or a little bit of both!

I apologize for the bad pictures; however, I will post better quality pictures in a few days. Thanks for your patience!
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Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

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PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 1:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Congratulations on a truly beautiful and impressive sword. It makes quite an impression in the photos, I'm sure even more so in person.
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J. Abernethy





Joined: 17 May 2009

Posts: 44

PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 10:52 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Patrick, it means alot to me coming from a guy with a most enviable collection of swords! It is very immpressive in person, I find myself just staring at it in awe.
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Josh Maxwell




Location: Michigan
Joined: 01 Jul 2009
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Posts: 55

PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 11:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice, sir. Where's the balance point and center of percussion on that beast?
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J. Abernethy





Joined: 17 May 2009

Posts: 44

PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 1:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Josh!

pob- 6 inches from guard
cop- 19 inches from tip
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Tim Lison




Location: Chicago, Illinois
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PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 1:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Holy smoke! What a beast! It is gorgeous. I agree that you were right to trust John about the fittings as they are really nice. Those dopplesolders that would have wielded such a weapon were hard, no doubt there! Congratulations on a really impressive piece of work. How about a pic of you holding it for scale?
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Patrick Kelly




Location: Wichita, Kansas
Joined: 17 Aug 2003
Reading list: 42 books

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 5,685

PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 3:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

J. Abernethy wrote:
Thanks Patrick, it means alot to me coming from a guy with a most enviable collection of swords! It is very immpressive in person, I find myself just staring at it in awe.


You're welcome and thank you in return. I love swords that make a unique impression and yours certainly does that and then some. If you never own another one you'll still be ahead of the game. I see a scabbard lying on a chair in your photos, does this go with the sword and are there any pics of it?
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Jean Thibodeau




Location: Montreal,Quebec,Canada
Joined: 15 Mar 2004
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PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 3:36 pm    Post subject: Re: My Odinblades Zweihander         Reply with quote

J. Abernethy wrote:

We looked at many examples of Zweihanders and took ideas from multiple swords. Sword weights of this kind at this length were between 8 and 13 lbs. Iím pleased to have it come in on the lighter end of the scale. I ignorantly wanted it to be a little heavier, closer to 9 lbs; but even at only 8 lbs itís a beast. When held straight out, the tip dips very slightly, maybe Ĺ inch. I expected more. I thought being a big guy I would be able to handle this thing easily, I was wrong. Though most examples of battle swords of this style were shorter. I have a lot of respect for those soldiers in history who actually used something like this all the time. I am also a bit on the skiddish side because I donít want to bury the tip in the ground or do something stupid in which I make it harder on myself than it really is to handle.



Firstly " Greatsword " in both senses of the word. Big Grin Cool

Weightwise 8 pounds is still manageable and the point of balance is pretty good considering how long the blade is !

I have a Venetian Del Tin Zweihander so I can relate somewhat as far as handling. Wink

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Sean Belair
Industry Professional




Joined: 08 Aug 2006

Posts: 147

PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 3:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

FYI that is the single largest piece of damascus on earth

congrats bro
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Ben Sweet




Location: 831
Joined: 21 Aug 2003

Posts: 512

PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 3:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Stunning sword by 2 amazing craftsmen! ... I'm looking forward to those better pics! Big Grin
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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
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PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 4:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Belair wrote:
FYI that is the single largest piece of damascus on earth.


I think possibly so. I wonder how many hours he spent forging it? Any layer counts or stats known? The W2 - 203E sounds like an unusual combination (dissimilar properties in heat treating and other aspects), and I am wondering if it was due to considerations for difficulty in heat treat of something this large.

Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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Bartek Strojek




Location: Poland
Joined: 05 Aug 2008
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Posts: 449

PostPosted: Wed 05 Aug, 2009 5:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

What to say?

It's truly marvelous!

It basically contains everything that I like about swords...

Congratulations!
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J. Abernethy





Joined: 17 May 2009

Posts: 44

PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 1:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks everyone for your kind words!

Tim, I do plan on getting a picture of me with the sword. I just want to drop about 50 lbs before I do so Laughing Out Loud ...nah, ill get one up soon!

Patrick, John was nice enough to make a scabbard for it. I wanted one to protect the blade from "touchers", and also my 3 year old daughter, its very sharp. Its a really pretty piece of heavy grain birch (I belive). I wanted to leave the wood exposed to see the grain, then laquered heavily. Unfortunately the scabbard was damaged by UPS during shipping. The chape took the brunt, and the finish on the wood is ruined. Luckily the sword is fine, but I'll have to refinish the scabbard. I'll get a picture of the scabbard with the next set of images. Its pretty neat, it has slots cut in the sides so the lugs slide in and out and remain exposed, while the blade and ricasso get encased.

Jean, I think Del Tins Zweihanders look awsome! If I hadn't gone for a full custom, I would have purchased a Del Tin.

Sean, I envy you for being able to see the process in person. I wish I could have seen the blade in its rough form straight from Jerry!

Jared, I dont know the exact mix ratio, but I do know there is alot more W2 than 203E. I don't understand the properties of either steel well enough to comment, I hope John or anyone else who might know could answer this question. The other damascus Zweihander John made had the same mix.

Ben and Bartek, thanks a ton! There is not a more happy sword owner in the whole world right now!
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J. Abernethy





Joined: 17 May 2009

Posts: 44

PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 8:51 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Im sorry Jared, I forgot the layer count. It is 512 I believe.
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J. Abernethy





Joined: 17 May 2009

Posts: 44

PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 6:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I found out that W2/203E is Jerry's premium blend. He is known for his turkish twist and uses this mix for all of it.

I hope she doesnt mind, but Jerry's girlfriend Cheryl posted on another forum in regards to this sword and had this to say:

"Jordan, this is Cheryl, Jerry Rados's girlfriend. I have been waiting to see how the masterpiece came out and all I can say is "OH MY GOD"!!!!! It's gorgeous. Thanks for sharing the pics with us. You will never know the hours we spent just getting the lugs the way they needed to be. At one time there was 5 of us working with a large swage block to get the lugs in shape. Congratulations on a great piece !!!!"

I thought it was neat to hear that Cheryl works with Jerry, and that there were others involved in making this sword!

p.s.-I hope I didnt do a no-no by copying a post from SFI and putting here. Let me know Worried
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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
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PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 7:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am not too surprised from the looks of it that it took 5 people at some points. (My guess would be multiple billets being worked until near the end when they were joined at manageable thickness.) I wish they had documented some it the work in progress with a video. The heat treat tank/facility for something of that length is on the verge of industrial grade scale too. 512 is an amazing layer count for something that large with no goofs. I really would like to know if the "random" just turned out during the grinding, or if they beat it with punches or something to upset the layers.

According to Verhoeven, pattern welding never completely died out. It may not have been common during the era of large two handed swords, but supposedly still existed. I am glad someone besides myself likes it enough to want it in a late medieval era style.

Congratulations.

Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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J. Abernethy





Joined: 17 May 2009

Posts: 44

PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 9:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jared, when I asked Jerry questions like, "How did you do it?", he would say, "It wasn't easy!". I wish I knew the techniques he used to make it but I just don't. Maybe He or John could illuminate for us. I do however have some images you might like that Jerry sent me right before he sent off the blade to John to be finished. It also helps to scale this bad boy. The first few pictures are in John's shop, the 2 at the bottom are of Jerry holding the blade. I wanted to put together a journal type image gallery like you were saying Jared. But I didn't get enough images.

http://www.abernethy-zweihander.blogspot.com/
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JE Sarge
Industry Professional



PostPosted: Thu 06 Aug, 2009 10:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's the most beautiful sword I have seen in some time. Congratulations!
J.E. Sarge
Crusader Monk Sword Scabbards and Customizations
www.crusadermonk.com

"But lack of documentation, especially for such early times, is not to be considered as evidence of non-existance." - Ewart Oakeshott
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J. Abernethy





Joined: 17 May 2009

Posts: 44

PostPosted: Sat 08 Aug, 2009 9:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

JE Sarge wrote:
That's the most beautiful sword I have seen in some time. Congratulations!


Thanks!

I was thinking of what Cheryl said about having so many people needed to forge this beast. Then I thought how John took the rough blade, did all the final shaping, 3 fullers, polish, etch and a perfect heat treat all by himself! I dont how he does it, but John is the man.
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Jared Smith




Location: Tennessee
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PostPosted: Sun 09 Aug, 2009 10:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

J. Abernethy wrote:
I wanted to put together a journal type image gallery like you were saying Jared. But I didn't get enough images.

http://www.abernethy-zweihander.blogspot.com/


Maybe its just my peculiar individual area of interest, but, I can envision your sword in this forum's reviews and gallery section. If it were me, I would request a certificate from the maker with some description of the materials, forging methods, and heat treat facility required/ used. If nothing else, it would add resale value to it (for knowledgeable buyers) if you decided to part with it in the future. It is possible they will not want to reveal too many of their techniques. However, they should be proud enough to eagerly furnish such a certificate in addition to the simple maker's mark on the blade.

Absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence!
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