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Nathan M Wuorio




Location: Maine.
Joined: 17 Mar 2008
Reading list: 3 books

Posts: 151

PostPosted: Sun 24 May, 2009 7:45 pm    Post subject: 3 Windlass swords.         Reply with quote

Hello all,
I am trying to figure out which sword I'm going to purchase next, and I have my eye on three swords, but can only get one. The first is a Windlass Landsknecht Battle sword, http://www.kultofathena.com/product~item~5008...+Sword.htm The second is a Windlass Late European Bastard sword, http://www.kultofathena.com/product~item~5010...+Sword.htm
And the third is a Windlass Flared Long Sword, http://www.kultofathena.com/product~item~5009...+Sword.htm
The question I am asking, is do any of you have any experience with one or all of these swords? My main concern is blade whippiness. I have had excellent luck with Windlass swords in the past, and I am really pleased with their quality. I love all three of these swords, the Landsknecht Battle sword the most, and the Flared Long Sword the least, but I want them all. I really like the look of each of these, and any information you guys have on them would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Nathan.

Nathan.
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Sean O Stevens




Location: Grovetown, GA
Joined: 22 Oct 2008

Posts: 208

PostPosted: Sun 24 May, 2009 9:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

First off, save yourself some cash... all three of those swords are are on sale in the 'Last Chance' section of MRL's site right now: http://www.museumreplicas.com/c-82-swords-knives-daggers.aspx

The only one of the three I had a close look at was the Flared Long Sword... because I really liked the look of it. I found it to be something of a limp noddle tho... at 38 in long it was not only whippy, but droopy.

I heard a lot of good things about the German Bastered Sword from Windlass... and was considering the Europian Bastered sword.. but I just didn't like the look of it as much. No idea about it's whip-factor.

I have had less luck then you with Windlass swords... I tend to stay away from them with anything longer then a 30 in blade at this point, because I find them consistently whippy.
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JE Sarge
Industry Professional



PostPosted: Sun 24 May, 2009 9:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would second saving your money and forego being tempeted by the longer bladed Windlass items. In the same general price range, I'd recommend the Valiant ATrim Practical Longsword - which is well constructed and has no problems with a wet noodle blade. It's easily twice the sword that the Windlass is for not much of a price difference. Big Grin

However, if you are bent on getting the Windlass offering and cannot be swayed; I'd go with the Bastard sword from the list you have posted.

J.E. Sarge
Crusader Monk Sword Scabbards and Customizations
www.crusadermonk.com

"But lack of documentation, especially for such early times, is not to be considered as evidence of non-existance." - Ewart Oakeshott
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Gary B. Ledford




Location: Southern California
Joined: 14 Feb 2009

Posts: 38

PostPosted: Wed 03 Jun, 2009 11:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I bought the landsknecht war sword a few months ago because i, like you, loved the look of the piece. Also, at 4 3/4 lbs, figured there would not be much of the "whippy" problem present; however I was mistaken. It is by far the whippiest sword I own, and I own at least a half dozen Windlass swords. I was extremely disappointed with the thickness throughput the entire blade, and even called customer service and spoke to Bruce Brookheart, thinking mine was a "bad one". He assured me it wasn't, and that they all had thin blades.

The blade on mine is significantly thinner even than the stats listed in the Kult of Athena. KoA says the thickest part is 4.7MM thick, but mine measures at 4.35 with digital calipers. Sounds like an infinitesimal difference, but I think the added steel would have made the blade much more rigid. However, this having been stated, I still took mine outside in my back yard and (unsharpened!) went after a fairly new 7 foot long piece of 1X6 I had lying around. The blade may be thin, but i managed to make 2-4 inch cuts into the wood, and break off large chunks with just a few smashes. I think this baby would have played hell with medieval shields, armor, and the man inside after seeing what it did to medium/hard lumber.

I plan to eventually take it apart (*&%# sword is peened!), and mount the beautiful furniture onto a thicker blade.
With the whippy blade from the Landsknecht sword, I think I will get some pre-cast bronze parts from a cheap wall-hanger, make a hilt and matching scabbard from padouk or rosewood, and make it into a Chinese jian (yes, the blade is that flexible).

I also own the Windlass German bastard sword, and it is a tank, as well as being a beautiful sword. There is NO whippiness at all, and I would not be afraid to use it to smash cinderblocks if I had too. It might be a bit too short-of-blade for your purposes however.

I have had a chance to briefly inspect the Euro Bas sword, and it seems slightly less whippy than the Landsknecht, though I didn't get to swing it or even shake it to check its flex. I will say it is a MUCH more handsome sword in person than the pictures on any website make it out to be.


One last note; if Windlass is the extent of your budget, the Windlass 15th century longsword the most attractive sword in person of the ones I have mentioned here, and is currently going for 169.95 on KoA. In my opinion (I know I am going to get stoned for this) it is far more attractive than the practical Atrims. Also, one was modified (further dulled, the tip rounded, and the handle slightly lengthened) by a WMA fighter, and he has had excellent success using it in sparring sessions and matches versus much more expensive blades.

Beware the Jabberwock my son,
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!


Last edited by Gary B. Ledford on Thu 04 Jun, 2009 6:56 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Nathan M Wuorio




Location: Maine.
Joined: 17 Mar 2008
Reading list: 3 books

Posts: 151

PostPosted: Thu 04 Jun, 2009 1:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's interesting about the landsknecht war sword, I had thought that it would be thicker. I DO love the hilt parts though, so I may buy it in the future and remount it on a different blade, but that's another story. I have also been considering the 15th century longsword, I have been for some time. I have seen cutting videos and it seems to perform quite well, and it's a beautiful sword. Since it isn't going to be discontinued soon, I think I can wait on it, I'm planning on the late european bastard sword instead, at about $140 from MRL. I'm planning on redoing the grip on it, after some practice on some lesser swords of course. I own the hoplite sword from Windlass, and it has a pretty thin blade, but it's a monster. I cut with it almost every day, and I have only had to sharpen it a few times. The hilt parts have all stayed tight with no looseness at all, and it cuts through everything I give it, so maybe a thin blade isn't a bad thing.
Overall, would you say that you like the landsknecht war sword?

Oh, I agree with you that the 15th century longsword is more attractive than the Atrims. Far more attractive.

Thanks for the input!
Nathan.

Nathan.
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Gary B. Ledford




Location: Southern California
Joined: 14 Feb 2009

Posts: 38

PostPosted: Thu 04 Jun, 2009 6:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

First of all when I said "landsknecht war sword", I meant to say the Landsknecht battle sword; the same one you were asking about in your first post. Thats what I get for posting at bed time. I have to say I do like the sword, though I would like it better of it were threaded instead of peened, so I could take it apart easier and mount a different blade on it. I would have liked it even better if I had waited three weeks until it showed up as one of their deals of the day, and saved an additional 25 bucks on it. the beautiful hilt parts alone are worth that price (they are even nicer in person) Also, one aspect unusual for a windlass sword is that it lacks the mirror finish on the blade, which most people dont like anyway.

However, I like my German Bastard Sword and my Sword of Milan (Italian short sword on KoA) much more- they both have very substantial blades and beautiful, well executed hilts (the wire wrap on the italian short sword is very tight).

Beware the Jabberwock my son,
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
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Nathan M Wuorio




Location: Maine.
Joined: 17 Mar 2008
Reading list: 3 books

Posts: 151

PostPosted: Thu 04 Jun, 2009 7:35 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

There are so many swords that I want right now, and not nearly enough money to purchase them all! The Sword of Milan looks really nice, and I don't think it's in danger of being discontinued either, so that can wait. I really want a longer sword that can be used with one or two hands, so the late euro bastard sword it is. Unfortunately, MRL says there are less than 20 left, and it's at a pretty good price, I think I'm going to purchase it over the weekend. Oh, I meant the Landsknecht Battle Sword as well, I got the two confused. I wish I could win the lottery, then I could buy all of the swords I wanted.....
Nathan.
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Robert Subiaga Jr.





Joined: 02 Apr 2009

Posts: 39

PostPosted: Thu 04 Jun, 2009 7:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've had my eye on the Landsknect sword you mention for similar reasons, and though I think I'll forgo it I might mention the plan that tempted me. First, as many have said, the guard and pommel are beautiful and worth dismounting for another piece. But in the past, a couple long, too-whippy Windlass blades I had made excellent project swords for no-nonsense cutting practice.

I wish I had pictures of these, which I have long since sold or passed on to colleagues, but I hope a verbal description will do. You'll notice that many historical two-handers and even a rare hand-and-a-half had blunted, wrapped ricassos for choking up in close quarters; think the Braveheart-style "Wallace swords" many sell. The trick is to use wood and "hilt" the blade in one solid piece from the pommel end to as much as halfway up the blade. Especially when riveted and epoxied in, the structural reinforcement more than eliminates most of the "whip."

The main tricky part is getting a balance point you like or are willing to live with. (Though I've even not bothered trying on one, keeping the handle/hilt all organic; while very "blade heavy" it made a fine cutter and didn't bother me over time at all.) There are a few options, some rather easy, but hard to describe in words.

The other tricky part is making a guard, though mostly if you want a larger one. Anything up to six inches across, just start out with wood stock that wide and have where the guard normall is still extend in a cross, then just secure flat barstock steel langets, like a polearm would have, except perpendicular to the blade.

Hope the descriptions aren't hopelessly confusing. But it you want a perhaps grungy (I prefer "rustic") looking long blade that's surprisingly functional, some of these longer, whippy Windlasses can be fixed up this way. (It's just that other offerings like the Hanwei Tinkers or VA Atrims are too close in price, tempting me NOT to bother with the work any more.)

Starting in a hollowed log of wood—some thousand miles up a river, with an infinitesimal prospect of returning! I ask myself "Why?" and the only echo is "damned fool!...the Devil drives...
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William Goodwin




Location: Roanoke,Va
Joined: 17 Nov 2003
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PostPosted: Fri 05 Jun, 2009 4:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

another dis-continued Windlass sword (if you can still find one) the Verneuil is a very, very nice sword. The one I own handles great, cuts great, looks great, the flex is darn near perfect.

One of the best that Windlass has done. I also have a 15th.c longsword which is also a good piece (don't consider it "whippy" at all)

Good luck on your choice, which ever it may be.


cheers,

Bill

Roanoke Sword Guilde

roanokeswordguilde@live.com
"I was born for this" - Joan of Arc
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