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G. Ghazarian
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PostPosted: Fri 01 May, 2009 6:04 pm    Post subject: Type XVIII b / c         Reply with quote

Please meet the latest of my creations,

Maybe a controversial type XVIII but one that I am very pleased with all her harmonious proportions.

Specs as follows :

Total length ------------ 53 inches
Blade length ----------- 38 1/8
Thickness at base ---- 0,320
Width at base ---------- 2 1/8
COG ---------------------- 3 1/2
COP ---------------------- 22 1/2
Weight ------------------- 5 lb 1 oz

The dismountable handle is made of stained maple burl with sterling silver bands.
This enormous sword handles very comfortably even with one hand.

Enjoy, and thanks for looking.



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G. Ghazarian
http://gloryships.com/
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Tim Lison




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PostPosted: Fri 01 May, 2009 6:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Simply gorgeous! Exceptional work sir. I really like the grip. Thanks for posting pics of this beauty...
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Stuart Mackey




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PostPosted: Fri 01 May, 2009 11:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Stunning. That grip and the pommel are simply gorgeous.
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Ben Potter
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PostPosted: Sat 02 May, 2009 9:45 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Beautiful work, very elegant.
Ben Potter Bladesmith

It's not that I would trade my lot
For any other man's,
Nor that I will be ashamed
Of my work torn hands-

For I have chosen the path I tread
Knowing it would be steep,
And I will take the joys thereof
And the consequences reap.
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G. Ghazarian
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PostPosted: Sat 02 May, 2009 8:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Gentlemen,

Tim, Stuart and Ben, your comments are very heartwarming and are very much appreciated.

Thank you, very much.

Gabriel

G. Ghazarian
http://gloryships.com/
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J. Erb




Location: Pennsylvania, USA
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PostPosted: Sat 02 May, 2009 9:39 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very handsome. Aesthetically speaking, I'm not usually a fan of bare wood grips, but for some reason I rather like how this one works. Happy
"What greater weapon is there than to turn an enemy to your cause, to use their own knowledge against them?"
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Jeremiah Swanger




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PostPosted: Sun 03 May, 2009 12:20 am    Post subject: Re: Type XVIII b / c         Reply with quote

G. Ghazarian wrote:
Please meet the latest of my creations,

Maybe a controversial type XVIII but one that I am very pleased with all her harmonious proportions.

Specs as follows :

Total length ------------ 53 inches
Blade length ----------- 38 1/8
Thickness at base ---- 0,320
Width at base ---------- 2 1/8
COG ---------------------- 3 1/2
COP ---------------------- 22 1/2
Weight ------------------- 5 lb 1 oz

The dismountable handle is made of stained maple burl with sterling silver bands.
This enormous sword handles very comfortably even with one hand.

Enjoy, and thanks for looking.


Gabriel,

Out of curiosity, do you happen to ask yourself before each project "now, what sort of sword would have Jeremiah drooling?"

... it certainly feels that way! Razz

"Rhaegar fought nobly.
Rhaegar fought valiantly.
Rhaegar fought honorably.
And Rhaegar died."

- G.R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire
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G. Ghazarian
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PostPosted: Sun 03 May, 2009 1:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you J. Erb for your honest opinion. Usually, I make more than one handle for my swords; one of leather and the other of noble wood. This makes it like having more than one sword.

Jeremiah, I understand exactly what you are saying. I am a drooler myself. When I am drooling too much, I know I am getting ready to create a new one.

It is also this drooling that made me put together a huge collection of all kinds of swords, starting with the regular imported ones that the market is flooded with, to the high ends of A & A and Albion. Not only do I have almost all the different types of Albion's hand and a half swords and I'm still waiting for others yet to be produced, but I also have high regards and respect to them to the point of being a member of the Albion Benefactor's Society.

Anyway, after purchasing what's appealing to me and available on the market, I started making what's in my imagination and was impressed with.

So Jeremiah, be careful with your droolings, you may end up like me! Happy

G. Ghazarian
http://gloryships.com/
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G. Ghazarian
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PostPosted: Thu 14 May, 2009 12:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I was having a feeling that this sword was begging for some embellishments?

So here is what I did with Lapis Lazuli and Onyx set in sterling silver.

Did I make or break the looks of this sword? Is this historically feasible or flat out ahistorical?

Your comments are important and are very welcome.

Thanks in advance.



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G. Ghazarian
http://gloryships.com/
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Lancelot Chan
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PostPosted: Thu 14 May, 2009 12:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello. I've checked your website and I found your works very interesting. You can do both historical style decoration as well as something that looks more modern by manipulating the volume and geometry of the fittings. One thing I wonder is how did you make your blades? What are their hardness, heat treatment and material used, if I may know? Thanks for your impressive works!
Ancient Combat Association —http://www.acahk.org
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Nightstalkers — http://www.nightstalkers.com.hk
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G. Ghazarian
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PostPosted: Thu 14 May, 2009 4:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hello Lancelot, thanks for your comments.

To answer your questions, I make my swords by hand, by stock removal method, very slowly, carefully and meticulousely. No CNC, just by hand on regular bench belt sanders, modified, adapted and set up to grind sword blades. I use 5160 carbon steel, though I have used A2 steel too, but what a pain that was (Type XVIIIb-2, XVIIIb-4w and 4L on my website). I don't take any chances when it comes to hardening, so I have that done by professionals to a hardness of RC55.

I hope this satisfies your questions,

Thanks again.

G. Ghazarian
http://gloryships.com/
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Thu 14 May, 2009 5:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mr. Ghazarian-

While I can certainly see your skills at work with the jewels, they have not produced something that looks to me like anything that would have been done in a historical context mating with the style of the sword at hand. For me, personally, this doesn't fit within my own preferences.

My disclaimer is that my own preferences are to see swords that are in line with what was found historically. There is such a variety of shape, form, and ornamentation found from history as well as room to make "inspired" versions from several pieces that I don't care much for items that extend outside of that already giant box. This is, again, just my own personal preferences and so must be taken with a grain of salt.

There are many, many historical swords of various cultures and eras that have highly ornate decoration that I'd absolutely love to see a modern maker attack. I can't even imagine the skills and extreme amount of time makers of old would put into some of their creations. It's mind-boggling.

This is sort of an interesting topic, to me, that shows a tiny, tiny sampling of such work: Ornamentation: Fantasy vs. History.

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Lancelot Chan
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PostPosted: Thu 14 May, 2009 11:35 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks a lot! That was very cool!

G. Ghazarian wrote:
Hello Lancelot, thanks for your comments.

To answer your questions, I make my swords by hand, by stock removal method, very slowly, carefully and meticulousely. No CNC, just by hand on regular bench belt sanders, modified, adapted and set up to grind sword blades. I use 5160 carbon steel, though I have used A2 steel too, but what a pain that was (Type XVIIIb-2, XVIIIb-4w and 4L on my website). I don't take any chances when it comes to hardening, so I have that done by professionals to a hardness of RC55.

I hope this satisfies your questions,

Thanks again.

Ancient Combat Association —http://www.acahk.org
Realistic Sparring Weapons — http://www.rsw.com.hk
Nightstalkers — http://www.nightstalkers.com.hk
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G. Ghazarian
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PostPosted: Fri 15 May, 2009 5:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
Mr. Ghazarian-

While I can certainly see your skills at work with the jewels, they have not produced something that looks to me like anything that would have been done in a historical context mating with the style of the sword at hand. For me, personally, this doesn't fit within my own preferences.

My disclaimer is that my own preferences are to see swords that are in line with what was found historically. There is such a variety of shape, form, and ornamentation found from history as well as room to make "inspired" versions from several pieces that I don't care much for items that extend outside of that already giant box. This is, again, just my own personal preferences and so must be taken with a grain of salt.

There are many, many historical swords of various cultures and eras that have highly ornate decoration that I'd absolutely love to see a modern maker attack. I can't even imagine the skills and extreme amount of time makers of old would put into some of their creations. It's mind-boggling.

This is sort of an interesting topic, to me, that shows a tiny, tiny sampling of such work: Ornamentation: Fantasy vs. History.


Nathan your point is very well taken and I must honestly admit, I couldn't agree more.

Adding jewels seemed like a good idea in the beginning, but after the job was a done deal, to me, it looked more like a last minute additions and looked very much out of place. The sword had a better charactere and personality without the jewels. At this point, I needed a second opinion, hence my posting the questions.

I have already taken out all the jewels - frankly, this made my wife very happy. I wish I can lay my hands on some more information on decorated swords.

Gabriel

G. Ghazarian
http://gloryships.com/
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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Fri 15 May, 2009 6:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

G. Ghazarian wrote:
I wish I can lay my hands on some more information on decorated swords.


I liked to the one topic, above, that shows a fair amount of authentic decorative pieces. The ones I included in that topic were chosen because I felt that they look like "modern fantasy" swords and are difficult to imagine being authentic! They're so ornate and "fantastic" that one might never consider they are hundreds of years old.

I can't promise anything quickly, but I will add to my list an action item to collect some materials for you. In the meantime, perhaps a new forum topic in the Historic Arms Talk forum might be in order? You could ask for photos and information on decorative swords of a particular type or region or era.

For me, this is exciting because I've always looked forward to the day that modern-day artisans with detail-oriented skill sets meet up with swordmakers and combine the crafts to create a final product. It was this kind of collaborative efforts that were done in antiquity. Today, many people like yourself are multidisciplinary. I figured it to be a matter of time before this type of medium (Swords, armour, etc.) started to attract talent from other artistic communities.

Have you see the work of Patrick Bárta at TEMPL Historic Arms? Much of it is quite ornate. There are examples across his portfolio that utilize a very broad set of skills, materials, and techniques. Very interesting stuff.

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G. Ghazarian
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PostPosted: Fri 15 May, 2009 8:35 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:

I liked to the one topic, above, that shows a fair amount of authentic decorative pieces. The ones I included in that topic were chosen because I felt that they look like "modern fantasy" swords and are difficult to imagine being authentic! They're so ornate and "fantastic" that one might never consider they are hundreds of years old.
.


I am familiar with this link and almost everything else on this site by now. I have drooled on them so oftem. Visits to Patrick Barta's and other sword makers' websites are almost everydays routine. I look for inspirations and ideas anywhere I can. I believe in "beauty in simplicity", ornate to a point of almost bent out of shape, does not appeal to me."Less is more" applies perfectly to decoration. Beauty should be in the proportions, harmony and the flow of lines, all combined to form a symphony. Decoration or ornaments should complement the subject. That's what my jewels did not do to my sword; they were out of place and foreign, they simply did nor harmonize with the lines. Then of course, everybody has a different taste.

You have my appreciation in advance for your help in finding whatever is needed to make something worthy of making and being proud of, and your suggestion of posting at the Historic Arms Talk is a good one. I shall do it soon.

Thanks Nathan, you have been of great help already.

Gabriel

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Carlo Arellano





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PostPosted: Fri 15 May, 2009 9:04 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Your sense of line and proportion are frankly stunning. I am a production artist by trade and your swords please me to no end.

The grip is a beautiful example of the golden ratio.
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G. Ghazarian
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PostPosted: Sat 16 May, 2009 6:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you Carlo!

I appreciate your comment.

Gabriel

G. Ghazarian
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M. Eversberg II




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PostPosted: Sat 16 May, 2009 8:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think the cross on the pommel and the stones on the ends of the quillons are overkill. The stones in the center of the guard are fine, but the rest takes away from the beauty of the rest of it.

M.

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G. Ghazarian
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PostPosted: Sat 16 May, 2009 7:08 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

M. Eversberg II wrote:
I think the cross on the pommel and the stones on the ends of the quillons are overkill. The stones in the center of the guard are fine, but the rest takes away from the beauty of the rest of it.

M.

I appreciate your suggestion. I tried every way possible and it always looked the same; out of place and foreign. Cabochon cut stones like to stand alone and don't do well clustered on western style objects. What will go well in this case is a large number of small jewels set deep in the cross and the pommel, Pavé style, rather than set on the surface und standing out.

I will try that on another sword some day.

Gabriel

G. Ghazarian
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