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Jeff Marlin




Location: Illinois
Joined: 01 May 2009

Posts: 14

PostPosted: Fri 01 May, 2009 4:35 am    Post subject: Iron sword-beater (Viking Period)         Reply with quote

Greetings!
Long-time lurker, just registered.

I was reading the book Kaupang in Skiringssal (a great summary of 100 years of archeology in the area dominated by the later Yngling kings) in which they list artifacts from individual grave finds.
One thing listed from several graves is an "iron sword beater". Unfortunately they do not illustrate this object.
Does anyone have a picture or know what the heck this is or what it actually did?

I can speculate that it was either for:
1: Work-hardening an unquenched edge.
2: Re-aligning the steel around a dent or nick to minimize the removal of material through honing.
3: No idea.
Any info would be helpful.

Thanks!

"With love and action shall a man live in memory and in song."

"Farmer, those are hideous weapons!"
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K J Seago




Location: Suffolk, England
Joined: 12 Feb 2009
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 95

PostPosted: Fri 01 May, 2009 9:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

a sword beater is something that isn't what you'd expect,its a weaving tool, sometimes actually made from an old sword(as some have been found pattern welded) there are pin beaters and other typestoo but generally look like the thing theyre described as. Happy
just another student of an interesting subject, Happy
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Douglas S





Joined: 18 Feb 2004

Posts: 177

PostPosted: Fri 01 May, 2009 11:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

When an artifact is dug up, usually the safe assumption is "3. No idea", unless there's some sort of label on it.
Most of the time, it's informed speculation. If we're lucky, we can look at where it was found, and which other items were nearby. This, more than anything else, offers the best clues.
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Jeff Marlin




Location: Illinois
Joined: 01 May 2009

Posts: 14

PostPosted: Fri 01 May, 2009 3:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ah, so it's another name for a weaving sword.
I've heard of them. Calling it a sword beater made me think it was some part of the sword maintenance kit.
Thanks for the clarification KJ!!

"With love and action shall a man live in memory and in song."

"Farmer, those are hideous weapons!"
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Jeff Marlin




Location: Illinois
Joined: 01 May 2009

Posts: 14

PostPosted: Fri 01 May, 2009 3:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Of course you're right Douglas. The artifacts don't speak so clearly to us.
But sometimes one has literary references, and the whole idea of experimental archeology is to duplicate an item, use it in various ways and see if you can create wear patterns which match that on the originals.
Of course this, like our reconstructions of extinct Western martial arts amounts at best to educated guesswork.
Thanks for your thoughtful response!

"With love and action shall a man live in memory and in song."

"Farmer, those are hideous weapons!"
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Jean Le-Palud




Location: France
Joined: 11 May 2005
Reading list: 17 books

Posts: 152

PostPosted: Sat 02 May, 2009 1:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jeff Marlin wrote:
Ah, so it's another name for a weaving sword.


Although I understand "to weave" and "sword" I can't imagine what a "weaving sword" could be in french (I am no weaver either). What kind of weaving tool is it ?

In some parts of France farmers use a very small special anvil for hammering the scythe blade and make it very thin in order to put an edge on it. This is said "to beat the scythe" (battre la faux, in french) And like you I thought that a sword beater could have been used for the maintenance of a sword. Laughing Out Loud
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Patrik Erik Lars Lindblom




Location: Göteborg Sweden
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 411

PostPosted: Sat 02 May, 2009 5:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Big Grin I'm lost and have no ideea what it is, can it be an Rangel?
there are pics of them in the book "De Norske vikinge sverd"

Frid o Fröjd!
Patrik
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