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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Sun 22 Mar, 2009 12:45 pm    Post subject: A scabbard for my Talhoffer         Reply with quote

This is the latest scabbard I made, this time for my Albion Talhoffer. It's a poplar core, covered in veg tanned leather, using Talbot's buckles and rivets from Revival Clothing.


















The chape is a place holder I stole from my Windlass brass hilted rondel. Anyone wanna make me a chape? Happy

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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Sun 22 Mar, 2009 12:48 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Michael,
Nice! Where did the floral thingies come from?

Happy

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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Sun 22 Mar, 2009 12:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank Chad.

I bought the floral thingies from Revival Clothing, but I don't see them there now. I hope I can still get them...I love those things. They were like 25 bucks for a pack of 30.

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Christian Henry Tobler
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PostPosted: Sun 22 Mar, 2009 1:17 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Mike,

We're out of them - that's all. They're not discontinued. It's just a matter of when Talbot casts up some more.

Best,

CHT

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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Sun 22 Mar, 2009 1:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

In that case I have floral rivets for sale, 30 bucks a piece. Happy
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Christian Henry Tobler
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PostPosted: Sun 22 Mar, 2009 1:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Actually Mike...how many *do* you have left? David Teague is doing that Wisby-esque gauntlet project, but ran out of the floral rivets.

Cheers,

CHT

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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Sun 22 Mar, 2009 2:04 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Not many, I'm afraid, maybe 10. And I need most of those to replace ones that fell off my Brescia Spadona scabbard.
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Matt Easton




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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 7:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's gorgeous, good work!
How do you shape the insides of the two halves, out of interest?

Matt

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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 8:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Matt Easton wrote:
That's gorgeous, good work!
How do you shape the insides of the two halves, out of interest?

Matt


Hi Matt,

Thank you.

I typically make the scabbards out of balsa and hand carve the insides using chisels and small planes. This one was different...I cheated, but the particulars aren't important. If I had more time I would have done the same thing for this one.

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Jean Thibodeau




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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 9:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Michael Edelson wrote:
Matt Easton wrote:
That's gorgeous, good work!
How do you shape the insides of the two halves, out of interest?

Matt


Hi Matt,

Thank you.

I typically make the scabbards out of balsa and hand carve the insides using chisels and small planes. This one was different...I cheated, but the particulars aren't important. If I had more time I would have done the same thing for this one.


Well, if I remember correctly balsa is very strong for its weight but sort of very soft: The leather covering should protect the outside but I wonder if the inside might be accidentally damaged if one put the sword back in the scabbard hastily and dug the point of the sword into the side of the inside of the scabbard ? Not that you would do this. Wink Big Grin

Looks very good by the way and the above is just idle curiosity and probably just nit picking to make my posted comment more than just " nice work ". Wink Razz Cool

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Matt Easton




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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 10:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I don't care that you cheated, but I am interested to know how you cheated?

Matt

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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 11:29 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's really excellent work, Mike. Bravo!
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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 11:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Matt Easton wrote:
I don't care that you cheated, but I am interested to know how you cheated?

Matt


PM Sent. Happy

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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 11:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
Well, if I remember correctly balsa is very strong for its weight but sort of very soft: The leather covering should protect the outside but I wonder if the inside might be accidentally damaged if one put the sword back in the scabbard hastily and dug the point of the sword into the side of the inside of the scabbard ? Not that you would do this. Wink Big Grin

Looks very good by the way and the above is just idle curiosity and probably just nit picking to make my posted comment more than just " nice work ". Wink Razz Cool


It is very strong. You can snap it with your hands if you try, and it will snap if it gets caught between your legs, but I have four of them and I've yet to break one or damage it with the sword. And I did sit on one once. Happy

It went "crack" and I said "oh no!" but then I couldn't find anything wrong with it...maybe there's a crack under the leather, but it didn't affect the scabbard at all. As you said, that's what the leather is there for.

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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 12:15 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Michael -

Quick question because I'm not quire sure what I'm seeing in the photos: does the scabbard have a central ridge? if so, it looks like you either carved it into the core or glued something else in the center of the core to create it. Is this true?

Stylistically, it's a great effect whatever it is. I like it quite a bit.

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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 12:34 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nathan Robinson wrote:
Hi Michael -

Quick question because I'm not quire sure what I'm seeing in the photos: does the scabbard have a central ridge? if so, it looks like you either carved it into the core or glued something else in the center of the core to create it. Is this true?

Stylistically, it's a great effect whatever it is. I like it quite a bit.


Hi Nathan,

I bought a really thin hardwood dowel, planed down one side of it to make it flat(ish) and glued it to the core. Then I planed down the ends, partiuclarly near the tip, to make it blend so there's not an abrupt termination.

Thanks for the compliment. Happy


Here are some pics of the dowel:




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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 12:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm confused. Is the core poplar or balsa?

I made a balsa gladius and scabbard a decade ago, painting everything with thinned wood glue in an attempt to add strength. I don't know how much that treatment mattered, but I was surprised by how sturdy the scabbard felt. Even after multiple moves that thing is intact and lying in a closet somewhere.

My main concern with making a balsa core would be that balsa can be too easy to work. It's so soft you can do much of the work with a craft knife and sandpaper, but the wood just flies off and it would be easy to remove too much. It can also take an impression easily and be deformed by pressure. Do you find any problems with that when using balsa scabbards with suspension?

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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 1:07 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean Flynt wrote:
I'm confused. Is the core poplar or balsa?


Hi Sean,

THIS core is poplar, and it is not hand carved, at least not the inside. All of the other scabbards I've made used balsa, and were hand carved.

Yes, balsa is quite strong, and I think it's strong enough. It is also completely non-corrosive (to the sword).

As for removing too much...not a chance. I am a very lazy person, and when I'm working the balsa my attitude is "aww come on, is this done yet?", so I'm constantly checking for fit. Also, I always stop the hollowing when the sword almost fits but not quite. This compresses the scabbard a bit and makes the fit perfect once it wears in. I suppose there is a chance of removing too much from the outside, but I haven't run into that.

One interesting thing...the balsa is actually harded to shape out the outside than the poplar is. I use a small hand plane for my shaping, and poplar shapes real nice. The balsa tends to foul up the plane and require frequent cleaning.

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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 2:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks for the clarification. The balsa idea intrigues me. Eliminating the leather, I could knock out "safety" scabbards of historical form for my collection much faster than I could make poplar equivalents. I don't do living history, so I don't need stitch-perfect scabbards, but I do need something to keep little fingers away from my sharps. This might be a good solution. I could paint `em or leave them natural and sealed. If they're all alike in finish, it would be obvious that they're just the means of safe display. In fact, I can imagine these kinds of light, uniform scabbards lashed to a poplar supporting frame so that they literally form part of the display. Hmmm.....

Dig:



 Attachment: 130.36 KB
display.gif


-Sean

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Michael Edelson




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PostPosted: Mon 23 Mar, 2009 2:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Sean,

Covering the scabbard in leather is the easiest part, if you're happy with a glued seam like this:



All you do is draw a line down the middle of the core, glue the front and half the back (the line is on the back), then fold the leather along that line and cut away the excess with a scissor. Then glue the other half, fold the other side along the seam and cut again. You end up with what you see above.

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