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Michael Pearce
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Location: Seattle, Wa.
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PostPosted: Tue 03 Mar, 2009 9:04 pm    Post subject: Type XIIIa Sword         Reply with quote



Oakeshott Type: XIIIa
Overall Length: 42-1/2 inches
Blade Length: 33 inches
Blade width @ Base: 2-3/8 inches
Blade Width 4 inches from point: 1-3/8 inch
Blade Thickness @ Base: .240 inch
Blade Thickness 2 inches from Point: .088 inch
Hilt Overall Length: 9-1/2 inches
Length of Handle: 7-1/8 inches
Guard Type: 1
Pommel Type: I
Center of Gravity: 4 inches from guard
Location of Blade Node (measured from Guard): 21 inches
Primary Hilt Node: approx. at cross
Weight: 3lbs 3 oz
Sword in the style of Great swords of the 13th-14th C. The blade is Marquenched 5160 spring steel tempered to HRc52-53, excepting the tang, shoulder and spine of the blade which is drawn back to HRc45-48. the blade has a concave distal taper for approximately the first 6 inches, then a straight distal taper for the remainder of the blade. The blade is fullered on each side for the first 21inches measured from the guard, then assumes a flat lenticular section from the tip of the fller to the point.
The hilt furniture is of mild steel- the pommel is keyed to the rectangular section of the tang. The handle is sandwiched hardwood wrapped in laquered linen cord then wrapped tightly in leather. The hilt may be dismounted using a 5mm Allen wrench.

Swords of this type seem to have been developed in part at least as a response to mail. The broad, flat and heavy blade weilded with two hands was more likely to shear mail than a single-hand sword and with it's mass and momentum would be more likely to do damage even should it fail to shear the mail. These swords largely fell out of use in the latter half of the 14thC.- possibly due to the increasing prevelance of plate armor.

Michael 'Tinker' Pearce
-------------
Then one night, as my car was going backwards through a cornfield at 90mph, I had an epiphany...
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Roger Hooper




Location: Northern California
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PostPosted: Tue 03 Mar, 2009 9:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is a great looking sword, Tinker. I bet it handles like a dream and cuts like a demon.

You are really cranking out the swords lately. It seems like you show us a new one once a week.
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Bruno Giordan




PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2009 2:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Mr Pearce,

could you explain us a bit more about the blade geometry of this sword?

I have followed your essays at SFI with much interest.
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Michael Pearce
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PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2009 8:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bruno Giordan wrote:
Mr Pearce,

could you explain us a bit more about the blade geometry of this sword?

I have followed your essays at SFI with much interest.


At the base of the blade this is essentially a flat-hex section with fullers. This reduces in thickness pretty rapidly for the first six inches or so, then goes to a flat taper for the remainder of the blade. The edge bevels are slightly convex, and as the sword tapers in thickness it gradually transitions from a hex-section to a lenticular section- IOW the cross-section would look like a long, skinny, pointy football. I don't sharpen swords prior to making a scabbard for them, so currently there are flats at the edges. These flats are relatively thick at the base (approx. .030 inch) and taper to where they are about .005-.007 inch across near the point. Sharpening could be achieved two ways from this point- I could simply grind bevels on each side of the edge and then buff the edges to debur them, or I could 'roll' the edge on which would result in what is generally perceived as a more period appearance and an increase in theoretical cutting power. I say 'theoretical' because the difference won't be great enough that it would make any detectable difference for the average user on standard targets.

I will put a beveled edge on this sword initially; if the eventual customer for this sword wishes it can be converted to a 'rolled' edge from there.

I hope this answers your question; if not feel free to clarify the question and I'll do my best!

Michael 'Tinker' Pearce
-------------
Then one night, as my car was going backwards through a cornfield at 90mph, I had an epiphany...
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M. Eversberg II




Location: California, Maryland, USA
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PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2009 8:05 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yet another awesome bit of work. I noticed this one has a dismountable hilt; will CAS be getting one of these?

M.

This space for rent or lease.
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Michael Pearce
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Location: Seattle, Wa.
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PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2009 8:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

M. Eversberg II wrote:
Yet another awesome bit of work. I noticed this one has a dismountable hilt; will CAS be getting one of these?

M.


Yes and no- they already have a model in the works similar to this sword; I turned over the prototype at SHOT in January. It has a longer blade, no flared shoulders, a slightly more interesting guard and a 'J' pommel rather than an 'I' pommel. You can see this sword on a youtube video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqBc8kldGnk

Yes, I know the shirt is appalling- that's my traditional 'Hang-over-test-pattern' shirt that I traditionally where on Sundays at a show. No one seeing it of a Sunday morning will have to wonder whether or not they have a hangover!

I hope that the CAS/H great Sword of War will be out late this spring.

Michael 'Tinker' Pearce
-------------
Then one night, as my car was going backwards through a cornfield at 90mph, I had an epiphany...
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Bruno Giordan




PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2009 10:29 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Michael Pearce wrote:
Bruno Giordan wrote:
Mr Pearce,

could you explain us a bit more about the blade geometry of this sword?

I have followed your essays at SFI with much interest.


At the base of the blade this is essentially a flat-hex section with fullers. This reduces in thickness pretty rapidly for the first six inches or so, then goes to a flat taper for the remainder of the blade. The edge bevels are slightly convex, and as the sword tapers in thickness it gradually transitions from a hex-section to a lenticular section- IOW the cross-section would look like a long, skinny, pointy football. I don't sharpen swords prior to making a scabbard for them, so currently there are flats at the edges. These flats are relatively thick at the base (approx. .030 inch) and taper to where they are about .005-.007 inch across near the point. Sharpening could be achieved two ways from this point- I could simply grind bevels on each side of the edge and then buff the edges to debur them, or I could 'roll' the edge on which would result in what is generally perceived as a more period appearance and an increase in theoretical cutting power. I say 'theoretical' because the difference won't be great enough that it would make any detectable difference for the average user on standard targets.

I will put a beveled edge on this sword initially; if the eventual customer for this sword wishes it can be converted to a 'rolled' edge from there.

I hope this answers your question; if not feel free to clarify the question and I'll do my best!


For sure it does, thanks. I thought it was a blade destined for mass production, btw.

With its wide base it looks archetypically "medieval", so it is very interesting. Congratulations
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Tim Lison




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PostPosted: Wed 04 Mar, 2009 8:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I love this sword! The simple furniture really make this an austere weapon. I like the shorter length of this sword too. Interesting video on YouTube as well. The shirt really isn't that bad!
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M. Eversberg II




Location: California, Maryland, USA
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PostPosted: Thu 05 Mar, 2009 3:40 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You sir, are a tall man. Very much taller than I Eek!

M.

This space for rent or lease.
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Michael Pearce
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Location: Seattle, Wa.
Joined: 21 Feb 2004

Posts: 365

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PostPosted: Thu 05 Mar, 2009 7:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

M. Eversberg II wrote:
You sir, are a tall man. Very much taller than I Eek!

M.


I'm about 6'4" so yeah, I'm fairly tall. The sword in the video has a 36 inch blade and weighs 3-1/4 to 3-1/2 pounds; I didn't have time to get stats and photos before the sword was turned over to CAS/H.

Michael 'Tinker' Pearce
-------------
Then one night, as my car was going backwards through a cornfield at 90mph, I had an epiphany...
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M. Eversberg II




Location: California, Maryland, USA
Joined: 07 Sep 2006
Reading list: 3 books

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Posts: 1,435

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PostPosted: Fri 06 Mar, 2009 3:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yeah, that's a clear 13" over me. Can't wait to see CAS's production model!

M.

This space for rent or lease.
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