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Ben P.




Location: Your Mind
Joined: 10 Jan 2009
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 200

PostPosted: Sat 10 Jan, 2009 5:03 pm    Post subject: Barding questions         Reply with quote

How effective was it? what types of barding were used?
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Jason Daub




Location: Peace River, Alberta
Joined: 14 Jan 2005
Reading list: 78 books

Posts: 162

PostPosted: Sat 10 Jan, 2009 8:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ben,

What era? What location? Barding has been made of the same materials and in basically the same manner as the riders armour in nearly every cavalry using culture at one time or another. To restrict it to Europe there are tons of period illustrations showing bards. As an example, the Luttrell Psalter (1325-1340) shows a caparisoned horse armoured with only a shaffron, other illustrations show mail under the caparison. Various household accounts include orders for bards "made in the manner of a brigantine" and others of quilted fabric. Cuir bouilli examples exist in various collections. At the other extreme are the full plate bards made after 1450, several are shown in "The Armored Horse in Europe, 1480-1620". There were also specialized bards for the joust, popular in "Germany" these were basically giant pads to prevent injury to the horse through a collision in the course of the contest.

The effectiveness of horse armour is not something I have made a study of and I haven't come across any hard information. There are anecdotes about men-at-arms riding through a pike square without being injured, not having reason to doubt these, the horse would have to be as well armoured as the man. I would infer due to the investment required and the massive expense of good horses that it was effective, or at least effective enough.

'I saw young Harry, -with his bevor on,
His cuisses on his thighs, gallantly arm'd,-
Rise from the ground like feather'd Mercury,
And vaulted with such ease into his seat,
As if an angel dropp'd down from the clouds,
To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus,
And witch the world with noble horsemanship.'
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Luka Borscak




Location: Croatia
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
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Posts: 2,229

PostPosted: Sun 11 Jan, 2009 4:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

How vulnerable horse in a close fighting that lasts some time actually is? Would infantryman automatically strike horse when horseman appeared in front of him or there is no time to waste on horse while man on the horse attacks you? I don't think horse charge on spearmen, of course spearmen would try to stop the charge with meeting the horses with spears. And what about cavalry vs cavalry fight? Would cavalrymen try to kill the opponents horses as soon as possible or concentrate on the real enemy?
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Ben P.




Location: Your Mind
Joined: 10 Jan 2009
Reading list: 1 book

Posts: 200

PostPosted: Sun 11 Jan, 2009 9:08 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jason Daub wrote:
Ben,

What era? What location? Barding has been made of the same materials and in basically the same manner as the riders armour in nearly every cavalry using culture at one time or another. To restrict it to Europe there are tons of period illustrations showing bards. As an example, the Luttrell Psalter (1325-1340) shows a caparisoned horse armoured with only a shaffron, other illustrations show mail under the caparison. Various household accounts include orders for bards "made in the manner of a brigantine" and others of quilted fabric. Cuir bouilli examples exist in various collections. At the other extreme are the full plate bards made after 1450, several are shown in "The Armored Horse in Europe, 1480-1620". There were also specialized bards for the joust, popular in "Germany" these were basically giant pads to prevent injury to the horse through a collision in the course of the contest.

The effectiveness of horse armour is not something I have made a study of and I haven't come across any hard information. There are anecdotes about men-at-arms riding through a pike square without being injured, not having reason to doubt these, the horse would have to be as well armoured as the man. I would infer due to the investment required and the massive expense of good horses that it was effective, or at least effective enough.


Era(s): from 1000-1630?

Location(s): Byzantium, England, Spain, Russia, Germany, France, Italy, etc.

BTW what are the names of the barding components?
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Dan Howard




Location: Maitland, NSW, Australia
Joined: 08 Dec 2004

Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 3,194

PostPosted: Sun 11 Jan, 2009 1:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nobody can answer your question in an online forum. You need to at least make an effort to do your own research and ask questions later, not vice versa. Pick a specific time period. Pick a specific region or culture. Then ask a specific question AFTER you have used the search function and tried to find the answer elsewhere.

The various components can be found online or in a great many armour books. Don't be lazy.

Caparison: A flexible armored blanket (quilted cloth, scale, or mail) covering the animalís back, chest, and hindquarters, reaching down to the knees or even lower. Also known as a "trapper", it sometimes had a hole for the saddle.
Chanfron: Head armor.
Crinet: Protects the back and sides of the animalís neck.
Peytral: A rigid plate protecting the chest.
Crupper: Plate armor protecting the animalís hindquarters and upper legs
Flanchards: Plate armor attached to the saddle covering the flanks of the animal. It closed the gap between crupper and peytral.
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Jean Henri Chandler




Location: New Orleans
Joined: 20 Nov 2006

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PostPosted: Thu 29 Jul, 2010 9:36 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would like to see some images of European horse armor from 1100 - 1450 AD.

J

System D'Armes Historical European fencing in New Orleans

Essays on Hroarr

Introducing the Codex Guide to the Medieval Baltic
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