Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Axe Hafts Reply to topic
This is a standard topic  
Author Message
Josh MacNeil




Location: Massachusetts, USA
Joined: 23 Jul 2008

Posts: 197

PostPosted: Thu 18 Sep, 2008 1:37 pm    Post subject: Axe Hafts         Reply with quote

So here's the story: I'm in the process of redoing a Cold Steel poleaxe into a shorter two-handed axe. While I'm not trying to make a 100% historically accurate piece, I still would like it to have some historical basis even if it is somewhat of a fantasy piece. My question is did battle axes in history sometimes have wrapped hafts; and if so, what kinds of materials were used? I find that most reproductions are sold with bare hafts. Is there some reason in terms of function or fighting technique that would make a wrapped haft impractical?

-JM
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Richard Hare




Location: Alberta, canada
Joined: 15 Mar 2008

Posts: 135

PostPosted: Fri 19 Sep, 2008 6:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Josh,

I know nothing about this from a historical standpoint, but from a practical point, I would say the shaft would have to be bare, in the area of the fore-most hand, with possibly studs, or leather wrap (or both) for the hand at the end of the handle.
The reason being, the for-most hand must be able to slide over the shaft, whilst the rear hand holds fast to one position.

This is my problem with many stupod axe handles made these days....They put on a thick non-slip surface, and the hand can't slide.
Looking at this from the perspective of a battle-axe, recovery time could be fatal if the hand couldn't slide up to the head.

If you are intending on this project being a short pole-arm, then a stop in front of the hand is ok, to aid in a tthrust, but this would really slow down manouverability in swinging it..

R.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
B. Fulton





Joined: 28 Dec 2004

Posts: 180

PostPosted: Sat 20 Sep, 2008 6:01 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some polearms from Graz, Austria, that demonstrate both "studded" and "smooth".







Hope this helps.
View user's profile Send private message
Chad Arnow
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

PostPosted: Sat 20 Sep, 2008 6:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

B. Fulton wrote:
Some polearms from Graz, Austria, that demonstrate both "studded" and "smooth".


And at least two covered with some kind of textile. I've seen fabric-covered hafts from time to time in other places too. Interesting.

Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
B. Fulton





Joined: 28 Dec 2004

Posts: 180

PostPosted: Sun 21 Sep, 2008 12:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Are you talking about the "ruffle" (can't remember the proper name) just below the spear/axe/polearm head?

Those are intended to keep rain off the shaft (and your hands from slipping) among other things.
View user's profile Send private message
M. Eversberg II




Location: California, Maryland, USA
Joined: 07 Sep 2006
Reading list: 3 books

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,435

PostPosted: Sun 21 Sep, 2008 1:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think those are called tassets.

How are the studs applied? Are they round headed nails carefully driven into place?

M.

This space for rent or lease.
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
Chad Arnow
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

PostPosted: Sun 21 Sep, 2008 7:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

B. Fulton wrote:
Are you talking about the "ruffle" (can't remember the proper name) just below the spear/axe/polearm head?

Those are intended to keep rain off the shaft (and your hands from slipping) among other things.


If you're asking me, no, I'm speaking of the whole haft (or large portions of it) being covered in a textile.

I've cropped one of your pics to show a textile-covered haft.



 Attachment: 23.52 KB
DSC00948.jpg


Happy

ChadA

http://chadarnow.com/
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
B. Fulton





Joined: 28 Dec 2004

Posts: 180

PostPosted: Sun 21 Sep, 2008 7:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Got it........was trying to figure out just which ones you were talking about. We spent over half a day in there, taking pictures of basically "everything" with permission to handle the pieces (with gloves) so we were happily disassembling armor, picking up 300-year old halberds, etc....

I took a ton of photos, these are just a few.
View user's profile Send private message
Johan S. Moen




Location: Kristiansand, Norway
Joined: 26 Jan 2004

Posts: 259

PostPosted: Mon 22 Sep, 2008 1:23 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

M. Eversberg II wrote:
I think those are called tassets.


Tassels. Tassets are a piece of armour Happy.

Johan Schubert Moen
View user's profile Send private message
Richard Hare




Location: Alberta, canada
Joined: 15 Mar 2008

Posts: 135

PostPosted: Mon 22 Sep, 2008 7:28 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think the question Josh posted originally was regarding a two-handed axe, rather than polearms. (But I could be wrong!)

Mr B Fulton;
Lovely pictures!! Do you have any pics of battle-axes?

best wishes,

Richard.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
B. Fulton





Joined: 28 Dec 2004

Posts: 180

PostPosted: Mon 22 Sep, 2008 9:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

None from Graz. I may have one from the Tower of London, a Scottish axe actually made in Russia, captured during the 1600s.

I'll have to look around for some others. If you're not picky about period, I have a large number of pics from the Louvre with Egyptian/Sassanian/Mesopotamian bronze axes.

Since I took over 4,000 photos in the Louvre, Cluny, Les Invalides, Leeds, York, the Tower of London, Victoria & Albert, and a few other museums, finding just battle axes might take a bit. Happy

That's not counting Graz, or any of the OTHER museums I've hit since 2005.....

I'll look though.
View user's profile Send private message
Josh MacNeil




Location: Massachusetts, USA
Joined: 23 Jul 2008

Posts: 197

PostPosted: Mon 22 Sep, 2008 10:52 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Haha my original question was geared more towards two-handed axes. But that's the magic of forums; sometimes the discussions can move a bit off topic. But no harm done Wink But if anyone could post some examples of handle wrappings on historical two handed axes, that would be great. I'll try and find some to post as well.

-JM
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Hunter B.




Location: Away from Home
Joined: 26 Aug 2008

Posts: 51

PostPosted: Mon 22 Sep, 2008 11:44 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Josh,

I just finished doing the same thing to my CS pole axe (for $30, how could I resist!). I ended up just leaving the entire haft plain (no grip or studding) and sanded it down (mine had some rough spots) then stained it. My OAL is around 48", and it swings quite nicely. Not even remotely historically accurate, but serviceable for a wide variety of uses (I used mine to take down an old dogwood).

I might wrap the end of the haft in leather and then stud part of the grip for looks later on, but as it is, even in the hot Georgia sun (and lots of sweat) I had no problems with maintaining a sure and steady grip on it.
View user's profile Send private message
B. Fulton





Joined: 28 Dec 2004

Posts: 180

PostPosted: Mon 22 Sep, 2008 12:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote



Horseman's axe from Leeds. German, I believe.



Egyptian axe recovered from a tomb. Two handed, plain shaft (not shown for size) and the shaft appears original.



Polearms from the Musee de l'Armee (Les Invalides). Halberd is smooth shafted, the others are studded, the leftmost is studded and wrapped.





An interesting axehead, but the rest is missing......
View user's profile Send private message
B. Fulton





Joined: 28 Dec 2004

Posts: 180

PostPosted: Mon 22 Sep, 2008 12:50 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

From the Neuburg, in Vienna.




All these halberds appear to be smooth, no studs, wrapping, leather, etc.



An interesting one for you. Also smooth.



Some more polearms from Graz.
[/img]
View user's profile Send private message
B. Fulton





Joined: 28 Dec 2004

Posts: 180

PostPosted: Sun 28 Sep, 2008 7:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Found some battle axes for you!

From the Staadtsmuseum in Munich yesterday.









And some polearms just because.





Enjoy!
View user's profile Send private message


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > Axe Hafts
Page 1 of 1 Reply to topic
All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2020 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum